News archive

This is an archive containing every news story ever posted on the BDT website. If you’re looking for a specific article, try the search box at the top right hand side of this page. Otherwise you can just browse the archive by selecting a year and month below.

July, 2010

Re-greening gets underway

Originally published: Friday, 30th July, 2010

Local volunteer group Landcare Broken Hill is about to begin a pilot project in the Regeneration Reserve in conjunction with National Tree Day.

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RFDS boards in talks

Originally published: Friday, 30th July, 2010

The local Royal Flying Doctors base hosted board members from the Victorian section recently.

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Guarding against injury

Originally published: Friday, 30th July, 2010

The Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) South Eastern Section has developed a dental initiative to encourage young footballers in Broken Hill, Wilcannia and Menindee to take better care of their teeth.

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Beginning of the end for our vegetation?

Originally published: Friday, 30th July, 2010

A South resident has found large grass hoppers at his home and said if the town ever had a plague of them, “they’d clean up everything”.

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Hot contest for finals berth

Originally published: Friday, 30th July, 2010

In front of a large and
vocal crowd the next
exciting chapter of the
city’s hottest football
competition unfolded
on Wednesday night.
This Under 18 season
has been as close as any
in memory and with only
two games to go before
finals, only ladder-leader
South is assured of taking
part in a quest for
glory.
Game one between
West and Central started
in near perfect conditions
with both sides looking
strong as they ran out,
although that changed
soon as the Magpies’
supporters noticed Jack
McInnes running water
and not playing, and
then things got worse as
Lindon Cox limped off
after only a few minutes
of play with the score
locked at one goal each.
What followed was a
red and black avalanche
as the Robins dominated
not only the remainder of
the first term but the rest
of the game.
It seems unjust not to
mention every West player
as they totally dominated
the game after the
first few minutes.
Cynan Smith was outstanding
as was Nick
Agius. Dylan Capper
and Liam King are continuing
to grow in stature
every week.
The return from injury
of Rikki Howell adds
more class and goal scoring
power, and opposition
players look over
their shoulders when
Keta Balchin is around.
His ferocious tackling is
top shelf.
But once again it was
Brett Martin, who is in
a rich vein of form, who
got West going. Martin
is the form player of the
competition at the minute
and he will have a huge
say in what happens in the
remaining two games.
For the Magpies their
junior stars Sean Power,
Jake Gepp and Kyle
Farcich battled hard and
the backmen gave their
all under extreme pressure
with Alec Bray leading
the way.
Jordan Gilby always
gives 100 per cent and
Curtis Jelbert got plenty
of the ball.
The Robins did just
what they had to do and
that’s win, but to win
and gain percentage is
a bonus. Apologies to a
handful of other West
players who could have
easily got in best players,
such was their dominance.
Final scores: West 11.8
(74) d Central 2.7 (19).
Best players - West:
C Smith, N Agius, D
Capper, R Howell, B
Martin, L King; Central:
S Power, J Gilby, A Bray,
C Jelbert, J Gepp, K
Farcich.
Goal scorers - West: R
Howell 3, B Martin 3, K
Balchin 2, N Kickett 2, D
Gray 1; Central: J Gepp
1, J Coombe 1.
Game two between
South and North was
billed as a close encounter
but the flag favourites
South had other ideas as
they took the Bulldogs
apart, sending a statement
to the competition that
they are still the force to
be reckoned with.
South had winners on
every line and just like
game one it seems unfair
not to mention more
players.
Todd Davidson, Cody
Scorn and Tom Derhem
played their usual high
quality games as they
racked up possessions at
will.
Jesse Whitfield and
Hayden Mackiewicz are
both skilful players with
big futures but it would
be the return to form of
Riley Elliott that would
please the South coaching
staff the most.
Elliott has struggled
at times this season and
looked to be carrying
a leg injury at different
stages, but he now looks
fit and ready to tackle the
grand final in form.
With Elliott back in
form and finding the goals
South have the luxury of
another reliable avenue to
goal.
With Heath Caldwell
still to return to the side
the Kangaroos already
have one hand on the flag
at the moment.
Nor th’s Darcy
Crampton, Tobias Hack,
Kale Grundy and Zac
Wauchope battled on
gamely all night. Sam
Charlton looked dangerous
around goals and
Oliver kolinac has a big
future.
With just two rounds
to go South are clearly on
top with 11 wins, but now
West, North and Central
have five wins each.
With South already in
the grand final, the other
three teams will battle it
out for a preliminary final
berth.
Final scores: South 10.6
(66) d North 3.3 (21).
Best players - South: T
Davidson, H Mackiewicz,
R Elliott, C Schorn, T
Derhem, J Whitfield;
North: D Crampton,
T Hack, O Kolinac, K
Grundy, S Charlton, Z
Wauchope.
Goal scorers - South:
R Elliott 3, T Derhem 3,
J Burcher 1, C Schorn 1,
J Whitfield 1, B Westley
1; North: S Charlton 2, R
Lehman 1.
Leading goal scorers C
Jelbert (C) 21, D Gray
(W) 19, J Tonkin (N) 17,
T Boland (S) 14, B Martin
(W) 12, J Gepp (C) 12, R
Elliott (S) 12.

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World of difference

Originally published: Thursday, 29th July, 2010

An ex-local now living in Dubai has come home to visit and says there are many differences between the two places.

Joel Preston left Broken Hill when he was 13 and moved to Adelaide with his parents and younger brother. He has been living in Dubai with his young family since 2007.
Mr Preston said coming home after living in a different country was a big culture shock.
"Obviously it's a very Muslim country and there are a lot of restrictions that come with that," he said.
"Women and men need to be dressed conservatively, no short skirts or open sort of clothing."
In Dubai, if people wish to consume alcohol in their homes they must hold a liquor licence.
"Its very hard and very expensive to purchase," Mr Preston said.
Grocery shopping is also very different, he said, as certain products which are offensive to Muslims are hidden from sight.
"You feel a little bit like some sort of criminal when you need to buy your pork; you buy it from behind a curtain basically."
He said some costs in Dubai were "horrendous" and others were fantastic compared to prices locally.
He said petrol in Dubai was cheap compared to Broken Hill, where prices can be as high as $1.32 per litre.
"I pay about $1.50 a gallon, so about 33 cents a litre for petrol," he said.
However some meals in Dubai can cost more than US$1000 for two people.
"We went to one of the local clubs the other night for dinner and the entire meal for everybody (13 people) was the same price you would pay per head in Dubai."
Originally a police officer in Adelaide, he was recruited to the Star Force team before being offered a job in security consulting.
He then moved his wife, Samantha, and three children to Dubai where they have lived ever since.
He said the Muslim culture was actually very similar to that of "country living".
"The fact that it is very family orientated, they'll do anything for anybody, they're very curious, they're very polite."
He said even though he lived overseas, he still considered Broken Hill home.
"I love Broken Hill, I still consider Broken Hill home even though I left here when I was 13," he said.
"I want my kids to be part of where I grew up and have the life that I had.
"Out in the bush and the kangaroos, my kids love the outback, they love the animals and I want them to explore this place. I still have a lot of family up here and we're still very close."
He says a lot of people know about his home town back in Dubai because he "brags" about the fact that he is from Broken Hill.
Mr Preston, his wife and three children Max (6), Charli (4) and Elle (2) spent last weekend here after some time in Adelaide with family.

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Project to be proud of

Originally published: Thursday, 29th July, 2010

Flooding in Mercury and Cornish streets could be reduced after the old gasworks site was transformed into a storm water detention basin.

More than one million dollars was spent on the site to allow it to capture up to six million litres of water, reducing downstream flooding by as much as 70 per cent.
Mayor Wincen Cuy said the opening of the Gasworks Reserve (Mercury Street) stormwater detention basin was significant and recognised the effort to get the project off the ground.
"(This is a) significant day ... (as we) witness the transformation from what it was, to what it is," Mayor Cuy said.
"Everyone involved needs to take pride in the project."
Mayor Cuy said the key to this project's success was organisations working together.
"This is an important example of what can be achieved when the community, government and organisations work together," Mayor Cuy said.
"This type of facility and initiative is absolutely fabulous."
A Federal Government grant of $659,000 ensured the $1.1 million project became a reality.
The stormwater detention basin should benefit Mercury and Cornish Street residents, who often suffer from flood damage during major storms.
The environment would also benefit as a rock-lined channel surrounding the basin would reduce the risk of scouring during stormwater flows.
Council's Manager for Infrastructure Paul DeLisio said despite some delays the project came in on budget.
"We've yet to work out the final cost (but) the budget is around the mark," Mr DeLisio said.
"The time frame took a bit longer than hoped but it is pleasing to see this (project has) come to finalisation."
While the basin has been in operation for some time it is now open to the public.
A chain fence will soon surround the area to keep out vehicles and create a boundary.
A bridge will be built over the basin and a permanent fence will also be placed around the rock-lined channel to prevent people from hurting themselves and reduce the risk of public liability.
"We're not intending to lock them (the community) out ... we just ask that common sense is shown," Mr DeLisio said.
Council also wants to add shade, tables, chairs and play equipment.
Cornish Street resident Don Campbell, who is in charge of the Norm Fox sports complex, said the stormwater detention basin looked great and now gave his grandson somewhere close to play.

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Helping keep trade fair

Originally published: Thursday, 29th July, 2010

Investigators from Fair Trading NSW have been in the city this week to run seminars on changes to legislation.

Fair Trading's Regional Manager Paul Coles said the seminars were important as they kept customers and traders informed.
The seminars are for incorporated associations, motor dealers and motor vehicle repairers.
"We don't do any mechanical inspections of vehicles when we come to a motor dealer, but we'll check that the information on the various forms in the cars correspond with the information actually on the car, like the rego number, the VIN (Vehicle Identification Number); and more importantly the build date," Mr Coles said.
He said that the build date was the most important and sometimes could be misrepresented, which can increase or decreased a vehicle's value.
The department also checks whether the cars going in and out of the dealership are in the police books; as well as checking that the dealer has a trust account in place when consignment sales are being done.
"We'll check that the dealer has got a trust account in place, making sure the money is properly coming in and out of that."
Licensing is also checked, and making sure the vehicle is licenced in accordance with the Motor Dealers Act.
He said that check were made on appropriate paperwork and that cooling off periods are acknowledged and "consumers are not signing away their rights".
"We make sure that the dealer is complying with the Motor Dealers' Act; to offer enhanced consumer protection..."
Mr Coles also re-inforced that consumers should be dealing with licenced motor dealers.
"This is very important because with the licenced motor dealers, in a lot of cases you'll get a warranty with a car."
Mr Coles said that he also investigates whether cars have been stolen or are incumbent.
"We run the Registry of Incumbent Vehicles where people can actually go and check, certainly for private sales, to see whether the vehicle is stolen or incumbent.
"But the dealer will do that."
Fair Trade NSW also deals with travel agents, pawn brokers and second hand dealers as well as running information sessions for both consumers and traders.

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Desert treat for visitors

Originally published: Wednesday, 28th July, 2010

The Living Desert is blooming with Sturt's Desert Pea and tourists are delighted at the outburst of colour.

The Ayoub family from Casino, NSW, spent yesterday walking in the sanctuary.
George Ayoub said they had driven through Broken Hill before but never stopped for a few days.
Mr Ayoub said the family had so far been to a few art galleries and the Royal Flying Doctor.
"There's certainly plenty to do," he said.
The family is on holidays for three months, and today will leave for Lake Eyre and Coober Pedy.
Living Desert Ranger Darrell Ford said the Sturt Peas had also spread along the walking trail leading to the Sculptures.

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Local tour operator three times a winner

Originally published: Wednesday, 28th July, 2010

The win on the weekend by local tour operator Tri State Safaris of three categories was a first for the Inland NSW Tourism Awards.

Tri State Safaris won the Tour and Transport Operator category, Eco-tourism category and the Energy Efficiency Award.
The Eco-tourism award recognises ecologically sustainable tourism with a primary focus on experiencing natural areas that foster environmental and cultural understanding, appreciation and conservation.
The Tour and/or Transport Operator category recognises a significant contribution to tourism through the provision of tour guiding services.
The Energy Efficiency Award is an environmental award that acknowledges the achievements and commitments shown by organisations in improving their energy efficiency.
According to Tri State owners Michael and Joanne McCulkin, winning three awards was a huge thrill.
"Coming back after an absence of two years from the Inland Awards Hall of Fame gave us some anxious moments leading up to the announcement as our competitors have had a chance to improve on their entries.
"So it was great excitement all round when our name was called out for the first award win," Mrs McCulkin said.
"When we won the second category we were over the moon. We certainly didn't expect the third, but feel very gracious that the judges thought us worthy."
According to Mr McCulkin the Eco-tourism and Energy Efficiency Awards were particularly pleasing.
"We have a team of very dedicated staff who are passionate about educating our customers about the benefits of protecting the areas we visit and we have put a great deal of effort into reducing our business's carbon footprint, especially through reducing our energy use and waste.
"Whilst we live and work in the red outback we have a green heart," said Mr McCulkin.
Tri State Safaris will now go on to enter the NSW Tourism Awards which are to be held in Sydney in November.
As well as attending the awards ceremony over the weekend, Tri State Safaris staff also attended the Sydney Retirement Expo to encourage further visits to Broken Hill and the Outback region.

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Cadets do city proud

Originally published: Wednesday, 28th July, 2010

Members of the local St John Cadet Division travelled to Molong recently to take part in their annual cadet competitions.

The Western Region Cadet and Junior First Aid Competitions also included representatives from Molong and Bathurst Cadet Divisions.
"They have to actually deal with a scenario that's been set up as a real-life situation," said superintendent Sandra Haring.
The competitions also feature a skills component, where cadets have to present a lecture or written piece on treating an injury.
"It's very involved," she said.
"It's not just a walk in the park."
The division finished up with several noteworthy results on the day in two sections.
Cadet Sergeant Aleesha Searle won the Cadet Leader section by making a presentation on treating heart attacks, injuries caused by falling debris and calming down distressed bystanders.
Emma-Lee Coff and Shara Bessell won the Junior Team event by treating a person who sustained gashed knees and abrasions to their elbows after playing with a friend.
Cadet Sergeant James Green was runner-up in the Cadet Individual Section; and a team of Cadet Corporals including Sarah Ray, Chloe Green, Jake Mathews and Reserve Cadet Connor McLaren were runners-up in the Team Event selection.

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Ready and raring to go

Originally published: Wednesday, 28th July, 2010

The final squad has been chosen for this weekend's clash between Broken Hill and Woomera Districts at Football Park in Adelaide.

Both teams will be playing for the Miners Cup, a fixture that was established in 2008.
This game will be played as a curtain raiser to the Port versus Hawthorn match.
With the South Australian side having won the past two encounters, coach of the  Broken Hill team David Ruddock said much planning and thought had gone into this year's team.
"We have selected what we feel is our best group of players. For the wide expanses of Football Park you need players that are fit and can run.
You also need strong marking forwards who can cap off the good work of your midfielders."
The team has been bolstered with the return of Harrison Cumming from State duties and the availability of key talls in Matt Nelson, Jamie Keenan, Wade Gepp and Ben Perkins.
"We also have a strong mix of on-ballers who we can rotate. Players such as Justin Heath, Jarrod Ruddock, Marcus O'Brien, Codie Howard, Jayden Kelly and Brad Mannion give us plenty of bite in the middle," Ruddock said.
With a touring party of 40 players, officials, umpires and trainers due to leave the city on Friday morning, Chairman of the Football League, David Sedunary said  that the escalating cost of taking part in the Miners Cup is something the executive is always aware of;
"It costs over $10,000 for this trip and we have been fortunate that both the CFMEU and the BH Community Credit Union have covered the cost," he said.
"When we met with Greg Braes from the CFMEU and Andrew Pellizzer from the Credit Union both took our proposals back to their respective boards and both agreed to support us."
Mr Sedunary said that without their backing it would be doubtful whether this annual event would continue.
"We are like most sporting organisations, we do not have a lot of money to spare so the generosity of both the CFMEU and Credit Union is vital for this game to go ahead."
The group train on Friday afternoon at Alberton Oval before having a joint dinner with the Woomera Districts team at the West Adelaide Football Club that night.
The game will start at 11.50am on Saturday.
SQUAD: Matt Nelson, Chad Ryan, Jordan Staker, Michael Westley, Heath Caldwell, Marcus O'Brien, Thomas Derham, Lyndon Cox, Harrison Cumming, Brad Mannion, Ben Camilleri, Karl Wilmore, Wade Gepp, Justin Heath, Jackson McInnes, Ben Perkins, Jamie Keenan, Codie Howard, Anthony Henderson, Jayden Kelly, Matt Dempster, Jarrod Ruddock, Dylan Stuart, Tobias Hack.
The dual Captains are Codie Howard and Jamie Keenan.


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Help them light up the night

Originally published: Tuesday, 27th July, 2010

"Friends of Leukaemia" are hosting a fundraiser in September to brighten the lives of many local cancer suffers.

On September 4, they will hold their "Light the Night" fundraiser and they are encouraging locals to get behind it now.
Friends of Leukaemia is a local group formed to support the patients and their families.
Katie Maxwell, a member, is encouraging everyone to come along to the fundraiser.
Light the Night entails buying a balloon, or making a donation and collecting a balloon, then gathering at twilight to carry the balloons which will have a tiny light inside.
They will then take a "gentle walk around Sturt Park," said Mrs Maxwell.
Afterwards food and drink will be available.
There will be three different coloured balloons - gold meant remembering a loved one that has been lost; white celebrating being a survivor; and blue giving hope and showing support.
Light the Night aims to be a night for the whole family to support the fight against blood cancers such as leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma.
"The money raised from the night is going towards a village being built in Adelaide for country and regional patients," said Mrs Maxwell.
"Most Broken Hill patients attend the Royal Adelaide Hospital or the Flinders Hospital ... treatment for a blood cancer can take three months or up to two years.
"The village will be like a home away from home."
As well as housing, the Leukaemia Foundation also provides free transport for patients to and from hospital.
People can form teams and even raising $100 will be a big help, according to Mrs Maxwell. She also hopes schools get behind the fundraiser as well.
"Come and support the night ... blood cancers don't discriminate ... it can happen at any age," she said.
Friends of Leukaemia will also hold two more movie fundraisers to help support the Leukaemia Foundation.
"We are hoping that one of the 14 units (in the village) will be named after Broken Hill to recognise the work that has been carried out locally," said Mrs Maxwell.
For more information or to register visit www.lightthenight.org.au and be seen in a good light.

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Mine 'deserves go-ahead'

Originally published: Tuesday, 27th July, 2010

The managing director of CBH Resources said he was reasonably confident of getting environmental approval for the Rasp project.

Last week the company met with the local community to discuss the Environmental Assessment Report for Rasp, which is currently on public display.
Mr Dennis said he believed the meeting went well and that the company had put in place enough measures to allow the project to go ahead.
"I don't want to sound over confident but we've put a lot of work into this," he said.
"We've gone about this the right way. We've tried to address and meet community concerns wherever we can - it doesn't mean that you can please everyone in this world."
Residents had expressed concerns over the Rasp development - especially in relation to dust and noise, but Mr Dennis said the company had gone some way to addressing these issues.
"We've employed consultants who are very expert in their fields - things like noise, dust suppression and so forth," he said.
"We've used best practice wherever we can and provided you do that you give yourself every opportunity of getting the approval.
"This is a project which should be approved.
"This is a mining town. What we're doing here is perfectly consistent with the reason that Broken Hill has existed for as many years as it has.
"It should get approved and for those reasons I am reasonably confident that we will get that approval."
Meanwhile the new owners of CBH Resources, Japan's Toho Zinc, toured the company's facilities on Friday and Saturday.
Toho Zinc has been associated with CBH since its inception and, after a tussle for CBH with Nystar earlier this year, Toho launched a friendly takeover. That means by the end of next month Toho will own CBH outright and it will cease to exist as an Australian company.
The president of Toho, Tatsuya Tejima, and the general manager of zinc and lead, Toshio Shimamura, were invited to visit Cobar and Broken Hill by Mr Dennis.
The tour included meeting staff and visiting the Endeavor mine at Cobar on Friday and Broken Hill and the Rasp mine on Saturday.
"It's very timely that they do so - they own over 90 per cent of CBH," Mr Dennis said.
"But more importantly (they are here) to meet our people, introduce themselves.
"They know a lot of them but there's a lot of people they haven't met."
Mr Dennis said both men had visited the city before - Mr Tejima had visited four or five years ago while Mr Shimamura had visited once before.
"Toho's not new to the company. They've been a major shareholder for quite a long time. Up until now they had 24 per cent so they know what we're doing," he said.
"They are not surprised by anything they've seen. They're very familiar with our operation, they know the business well, they know our plans and strategies.
"I think they're very pleased with what they've seen which is important because they've spent a lot of money buying the business."
The Toho pair left for Japan on Sunday.


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Driver injured

Originally published: Tuesday, 27th July, 2010

Two cars collided at an intersection near Jubilee Oval yesterday at about 1pm.

A 19-year-old male was driving north on Silver Street when his Ford Courier and a Holden Statesman collided.
The female driver of the Statesman was fitted with a neck brace by ambulance officers after complaining of neck and back pain. The 47-year-old woman was then taken to hospital. The male P-plate driver escaped unharmed.
Police said they are still investigating the circumstances of the accident.

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Mother doing hard yards for school

Originally published: Monday, 26th July, 2010

A mother on an outback station is raising money for the School of the Air by entering Sydney's "City2Surf" marathon.

Zanna Gale is the mother of three girls who study by correspondence. She works on the P and C and would like to do something for the 98 students who attend School of the Air.
She lives on Pincally Station, 270 kilometres north of Broken Hill, and for more than a year she has used the vast, dusty environment as a running track.
Zanna said she could never run long distances but thought she would give it a go when she saw a friend do it.
She found an online trainer to help her but after running a half marathon, she pulled some muscles and was unable to run.
So she thought she would attempt the Sun-Herald City2Surf on August 8. It covers 14 kilometres from the CBD to Bondi Beach.
Her original goal was $1000 but so far she has raised more than $2000 and is happy with the result.
"Anything I get more than $2000 will be a bonus," said Zanna.
At 35 years of age, she feels it means more to be running for a cause. She also said the exercise is addictive.
"Once you start, anyone can do it," she said.


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Tree Day planting on again

Originally published: Monday, 26th July, 2010

The City Council is calling on all locals to help plant native trees and shrubs for Planet Ark's National Tree Day.

Council's Tidy Towns Committee is hosting the event which is being held on August 1 from 1pm to 3pm.
Shane Stenhouse, Asset Planner for Parks and Reserves, said he hoped that having the tree planting later in the day will attract a bigger crowd.
"We might get a better roll-up with the change in time," Mr Stenhouse said.
"The small turnout last year ... was a bit disappointing."
The tree planting day will take place in Bagot Street behind the O'Neill Park soccer ground.
Gloves, tools and equipment for planting, drinking water, refreshments, and a barbecue will be provided.
The Tidy Towns Committee is working to beautify the area and prevent soil erosion and by doing this they hope it will be revegetated.
But they are also encouraging everyone to just have a fun afternoon.
"We hope that people roll up and get some enjoyment out of it," Mr Stenhouse said.
However, he said anyone taking part should show up on time or they could miss out on the planting.
Michelle Cook, public relations manager for Planet Ark, said National Tree Day had been running for 15 years and in that time 15 millions trees had been planted.
"It is a great environmental event and brings the entire community together," she said.
"It may only seem like a small thing but nationally it makes a big difference."
Three trees are all that's need to offset the average home's annual lighting output, according to Planet Ark.
Ms Cook also said the day also gave locals the chance to come together and work towards providing a better environment.
The theme this year' is "Life is better with National Tree Day", and according to Ms Cook the benefits of National Tree Day include the absorption of carbon dioxide, providing a home for native animals and helping to beautify your town.
For more information go to the www.treeday.planetark.org/site/46876 or contact Shane Stenhouse 8080 3370.



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School focus on father figures

Originally published: Monday, 26th July, 2010

A newly formed group, Broken Hill Father Figures, is hoping to encourage more dads to become involved in their children's lives.

Many dads had little or no contact with their kids, said Willyama High School teacher Simeon Kloczko.
This could have serious consequences for the children, he said, with statistics showing that they were more likely to commit crime and have poorer health and education.
Mr Kloczko said the school hoped to encourage more fathers to be part of their child's life through its "Broken Hill Father Figures" program.
"We would like to provide an opportunity for local fathers and father figures to network, build and maximise skills and get some real world advice on how to encourage their children in a positive way."
He said the school wanted to not only encourage dads but also father figures such as grandfathers, stepfathers, uncles, mentors, youth leaders, teachers, pastors and coaches to become involved.
Dads and father figures are invited to a free breakfast at the Democratic Club on Tuesday, August 3 between 7.30am and 8.30am.
During the breakfast a DVD - "What Kids Really Need from their Dads" - with advice and ideas for fathers will be shown, and copies of a booklet handed out.
People need to register for the breakfast online - www.fatherfigure.com.au - or by contacting the school on 8088 1055, by next Tuesday.
Mr Kloczko said while Willyama was developing the program the school wanted to see it grow and "be driven by fathers".
"It really will depend on the level of interest."
He said he was inspired to start the program after listening to Professor Bruce Robinson, co-founder of the Fathering Project, at a recent conference.
"As a new dad listening to Professor Robinson I was moved by statistics that show that fathers play such a major role in their children's development."
He said the impact of father-absence on education, health and crime was estimated to cost over $12 billion each year.

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Magpies knocked off perch

Originally published: Monday, 26th July, 2010

The Bulldogs caused a major upset on Saturday when they defeated the much fancied Central side in a classic encounter at League headquarters.

For the Magpies it was their first taste of defeat for the season and for North it was the first time in 2010 that they have put three wins together on the trot, and in front off some very happy old timers.
The Magpies again lost Ben Perkins before the game and he was replaced by Paterson.
North's 250 gamer, Jason Harwood, won the toss and elected to kick to the Country Energy end in the opening term with the aid of a slight breeze.
It didn't take them long to slip into gear with Burton kicking the opener inside the first 40 seconds and when Ruddock goaled minutes later the Bulldogs had the perfect start.
The Magpies had to wait until the 10-minute mark to get their first through Gepp. This game became a tight contest in the middle stages with neither side willing to take a gamble. It wasn't until the time-on period when North grabbed a handy lead after Watson kicked two unanswered goals.
The Bulldogs took a 22 point lead into the first change.
The second term started with the Bulldogs going on the attack early and they were rewarded when Kelly goaled to extend the lead to 28 points.
The Magpies needed something from their key forwards and Gepp responded with a great snap over his shoulder to reduce the lead to under 4 goals.
North, not to be denied, hit back with goals to Burton and Howard and the margin was out to 34 points.
That woke the Magpies up and they soon clicked into gear. Goals to Cullen and Power cut the lead to just 20 points.
The Magpies were now applying pressure on the slow North defenders and it was paying off as Camilleri goaled to make it a 14 point game.
Approaching halftime Keenan kicked Central's fifth for the term and the margin at the change was only 8 points.
The all important third term got under way with the Bulldogs dropping two men back into Central's forward half. This meant that Central had two men loose in North's forward half, especially important with North going with the breeze.
The Bulldogs got a gift early in the term when Fenton goaled to give his side a 15 point lead.
The game didn't rise to any great heights in the middle stages.
North would go forward and kick to the Central loose men, then the Magpies would go forward and kick it to the North loose men.
North's kicking with the breeze looked like they were defending a 15 point lead instead of attacking and increasing the margin.
As the term was drawing to a close Keenan stood up for the Magpies with two goals within a minute to make the margin just 3 points.
North had one last chance and McConnell gave his side some breathing space with his first. The Bulldogs went into the last change with a shaky 9 point lead.
It had come down to this - one more quarter.
Could the perfect record stay intact?
With the breeze at their tail would Central over-run the Bulldogs?
It looked likely inside the opening minutes when Keenan marked and goaled to reduce the margin to just three points.
Now how would the Bulldogs respond?
They responded in kind with a goal to Grundy at the 4-minute mark and the lead was again 9 points.
From that moment it became a slog with both sides giving their all and giving nothing away.
The Magpies had a fair bit of the footy in the latter stages, but four straight behinds would see their perfect season come undone with the Bulldogs hanging on to a 5 point lead and pulling off a memorable win.
Credit must go to both sides on a great contest.
Best Players - NORTH: J. Kelly, C. Howard, B. Johnson, J. Ruddock, C. Billings, D. Stuart; Central: B. Cullen, B. Camilleri, M. Anderson, J. Heath, K. Wilmore, B. Mannion.
Goalkickers - North: W. Burton 2, J.Watson 2, J. Ruddock 1, J. Kelly 1, C. Howard 1, M. Fenton 1, J. McConnell 1, K. Grundy 1; Central: J. Keenan 4, W. Gepp 2, B. Cullen 1, S. Power 1, B. Camilleri 1.

SCOREBOARD
North    4.4    7.4    9.7    10.7 (67)
Central    1.0    6.2    8.4    9.8 (62)

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City left behind

Originally published: Friday, 23rd July, 2010

Broken Hill felt left behind and ignored by the major political parties, according to Nationals Senator Fiona Nash.

Senator Nash, Leader of the Nationals in the Senate, visited Broken Hill as part of her "Talk to Me Tour" of NSW.
She spent an hour in the Town Square talking with local voters before dashing off to meet with City Council.
"The biggest thing I've been hearing is that people are feeling very neglected by both the State and Federal levels of government," said Sen Nash.
"People feel very much left behind."
Sen. Nash said issues about health and aged care had been raised yesterday, with many worried about dementia patients at the hospital. Policing was also a concern, she said.
Sen. Nash also visited Menindee yesterday and she said worries about the state of the road to Pooncarie were front and centre. She will visit Wilcannia this morning.
"People feel neglected here in Broken Hill, and that stretches right across the State. Decision-making and services have been weighted towards the city," Sen Nash said.
The Nationals would endeavour to bridge that divide, she said.
Fran McKinnon, who keeps The Nationals banner aloft in Broken Hill, said people had been forthcoming.
"People have brought up a lot of issues, particularly the lack of health services and aged care beds," she said.
"It's good to see her out here. It's not her first visit of course, she's a hardworking senator and she'll be there to represent us.
"That's what the Nationals are about after all. They're a sympathetic ear for the bush."


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Local indigenous exhibition opens

Originally published: Friday, 23rd July, 2010

An new exhibition of works by Aboriginal artists will open tonight.

Muriel Riley, Fiona Bates and Phillip Bates have all contributed works to the show which will be opened by Maureen O'Donnell at the Regional Art Gallery at 6pm.
Muriel Riley is a Barkanji woman and member of the "stolen generation". Born in Wilcannia, she was sent to Sydney when she was 18 but hitchhiked her way back home using an old photograph of the Wilcannia bridge to get directions.
She took up painting in 2006 and in 2009 won the open section of the Far West Emerging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Prize at the Regional Art Gallery.
Ms Riley specialises in landscape paintings, focusing on places of historical and cultural significance to her life.
Phillip Bates was born in Wilcannia and grew up in Western NSW. He has developed a personal style based on his people's traditional imagery and style.
Several of his works use coloured sand to add texture and dimension. They will be displayed alongside works from Fiona Bates who is a late addition to the exhibition.
A community art work will also be on show tonight. As part of the NAIDOC Week celebrations, two simple canvasses have been transformed into a work that reflects the community spirit of the celebrations.
The canvases and paint were provided to the NAIDOC Week committee to give participants at the annual Family Fun Day the chance to create a piece of community-owned art that would stand as a reminder of the 2010 event.
The exhibition coincides with the opening of the Outback Art Prize and the announcement of the winner.

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Elliot's party potential

Originally published: Friday, 23rd July, 2010

A local high school student will hold a drug and alcohol-free dance party for  teenagers later this month.

The party is being held in conjunction with the Max Potential leadership program, and year 11 student Elliot Mallon has been organising the event as part of his community project.
Barrier Liquor Accord secretary and one of the Max Potential organisers, Ann Rogers, said she fully supported the idea.
"They have to do a community project for Max Potential, and Elliot's looking to hold a dance party. It'll be for kids to come to where there are no drugs or alcohol," Ms Rogers said.
"The Liquor Accord and licensing (pubs and clubs) around the town are helping Elliot get this together by giving him a donation so that he can have security and all that sort of thing."
A DJ will perform and security will be provided.
The Broken Hill High School student will be having competitions with prizes on the night. .
The party will be held on Saturday, July 31 from 7pm to midnight at the YMCA.

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Phillips starring in Canada

Originally published: Friday, 23rd July, 2010

Former Local soccer star Nikki Phillips has the best of both worlds, combining a holiday in Canada whilst playing soccer (or football as the rest of the world calls it).

Nikki was due to leave Australia last year, just before the local soccer grand final, but was not allowed to board her flight due to symptoms of a bad flu virus.
Nikki returned just in time to play in St Joseph's ladies' premiership team. In early 2010 Nikki made the trip successfully to Canada and is now having a ball with friends and playing soccer every week.
She is playing in a soccer competition with eight teams in Kamloops Canada, and her team is called Excel.
"Excel is a great team, the girls really made me feel welcome and they are very happy with me and they don't want me to leave," said Nikki recently.
"The competition is a lot different to back home as we don't have linesman here and thus, whatever the ref says goes sort of thing, but they are very fair umpires.
"We play on different fields every week which is good and I have been asked to play in a tournament from July 30 to August 2 (long weekend), by one of the other teams we play against, who are called Danchuk.
"That tournament is out of town, so we will be playing teams like Vancouver and Kewlona, which will be great, providing I can meet the cost to play of $450.
"I am currently one of the top goal scorers out of the whole competition with 29 goals in 18 games.
"We play every Monday and Wednesday and have won 17 games and drawn one, which is their best record apparently, so I am very happy about that.
"I am doing fine, enjoying my time in Canada but anticipate being home in October.
"I still wear my lucky number 13 guernsey."
Nikki keeps up with all the local soccer gossip by chatting with friends from the Hill on Facebook.
"I can always rely on Whitey, Dave Bearman or Georgia Picton for the latest 'goss' from the Hill, she said.

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Netball star visits

Originally published: Thursday, 22nd July, 2010

Adelaide Thunderbirds netballer Geva Mentor travelled to the Silver City this week and visited all the local sights.

The English defender spends six months playing netball for the Adelaide Thunderbirds and six months back in England.
Geva has been playing netball since she was 12, and has now finished playing in the ANZ Championship in which the Thunderbirds beat Waikato Bay of Plenty in the grand final.
Geva won best on ground in the match and she said it was amazing to play a grand final in Adelaide.
"It is a great way to finish ... in front of your home crowd," she said.
Geva says she loves travelling back and forth between Australia and England to play.
"I love being able to explore different countries and experience different cultures," she said.
She travelled to Broken Hill with her friend, James Morley, who suggested she should come to Broken Hill while he visited his parents.
James is a massage therapist for the Adelaide Thunderbirds.
Geva and her mother and brother arrived in Broken Hill on Monday and headed back to Adelaide yesterday.
While they were in town they stayed at the Palace Hotel which Geva "found amazing", they also visited all the local "hot spots".
They toured the Daydream Mine, the Sculptures, had a wander around Argent Street, visited the Big Picture and the Albert Kersten GeoCentre and took a tour of the Royal Flying Doctor Service base.
"There is so much history ... I've heard of it but I never thought it was so much ... there is so much wealth and depth to it," she said.
"I really enjoyed showing my mum and brother around."

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Chill out

Originally published: Thursday, 22nd July, 2010

Locals are being told to take a "chill pill" tomorrow for Lifeline's annual Stress Down Day.

Lifeline will be holding a sausage sizzle in the town square and a prize will be awarded to the person with the best loud tie and the most outrageous slippers.
Businesses around town will also be helping on the day with employees going casual to work.
Stress Down Day encourages everyone to dress up or down, or be daring and wear their slippers to work or school and help raise money for Lifeline.
Stress has become increasingly serious, affecting most people.
All donations that are collected on the day will go towards local services or support Lifeline's 24-hour crisis telephone support service.
Lifeline's fundraising organiser Trevor Odgers said it helps more than 1,250 people a day, and to some people that one phone call can be life-saving.


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"Colleen" likes it at home and away

Originally published: Thursday, 22nd July, 2010

Home and Away star Lyn Collingwood visited the city this week to do some sightseeing.

Lyn, who plays Colleen Smart in the television soap opera, travelled to the city by train on Monday.
Before starting her career as an actress, Lyn worked as social worker and a teacher of English, drama and history.
Lyn was in the original cast of Home and Away when it started in 1988. However, she left the show only after one year but came back in 1999 to reprise her role as Colleen Smart.
Lyn has also worked in other shows such as All Saints, Country Practice, Murder Call, and Spellbinder. She has also worked in a number of movies.
While is Broken Hill, Lyn is staying with a friend who works for the Royal Flying Doctor Service and she thought it would be a nice chance to visit.
"I've never stayed ... just passed through ... you get a bit sick of just hopping on a plane and going overseas," Lyn said.
So far she has visited Silverton and the Daydream mine which she thought was "terrific".
She toured the Royal Flying Doctor Service Base yesterday and hopes to visit the Menindee Lakes and Trades Hall before leaving on Sunday.
"I heard it (the Menindee Lakes) is all quite lush," she said.
Lyn also hopes she can take in a movie or have a manicure and do the "sorts of things I never do in Sydney".
She has enjoyed her stay so far and has found all the locals to be really friendly.
Lyn also made comment on the development of the film studio. "When the film studio is up and running it will be good for the community," she said.
Once back in Sydney, she will be acting in Home and Away again.
Lyn said she enjoys what she does and despite having a lot of interesting jobs she had never worked just for the money.
"I don't do it for the money ... but it's nice to be paid for what you love doing," she said.

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Shortage of dementia beds upsetting

Originally published: Wednesday, 21st July, 2010

A South Broken Hill resident is upset at the shortage of aged care facilities in the city.

Ken Abbot, along with his wife has cared for his 88-year-old mother since her dementia diagnosis in April.
He said there was a shortage of services like high care facilities and respite beds for people in her position.
"My concern is there are insufficient facilities in Broken Hill for those who have been diagnosed with severe dementia and things like that," Mr Abbot said.
He referred to recent BDT reports about the local hospital housing a large number of dementia patients.
"I can appreciate the hospital's situation, but they're only put in that position because of the situation with the nursing homes."
Mr Abbot said there was no point in relocating the War Vets home from Thomas Street to the South because it "achieved nothing".
He said that while the city did have some facilities, they were very difficult to get into.
"It's not easy to get the elderly into these facilities.
"When my mother was diagnosed about April as needing 'high care'. The only facility she could go into was St Anne's."
Southern Cross Care chief executive Allan Carter said the War Veterans, Aruma Lodge and St Anne's all had one respite bed each, which was in line with the Federal Government's ratio for Broken Hill's population.
Mr Carter said Southern Cross Care had no plans, at this stage, to increase the number of respite beds in any of its three facilities, but has added 13 low care beds which, he says, is "an increase in the availability of aged care beds".
He also said that approaches for respite do not go through Southern Cross Care. They are simply told when and who will be staying in one of the respite beds.
He said it wouldn't surprise him if the bed was booked out until October 2011, as many people caring for dementia patients book ahead if they are going on holidays.
"From time to time it's empty, but very rarely."
He also said that he could not comment on any individual cases, such as Mr Abbot's.
Local Federal MP Sussan Ley said that she welcomed the new aged care home but knew the city had a respite shortage.
Ms Ley said she had found that "more people were managing at home".
She said that if she was elected for another term she would push for improvements to respite facilities and emergency respite facilities.

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Winner revealed soon

Originally published: Wednesday, 21st July, 2010

The winner of the 2010 Outback Art Prize will be announced on Friday.

Formerly restricted to works on paper, this year the prize has been opened to all works that reflect the spirit, beauty and diversity of the outback.
BH Regional Art Gallery manager, Bruce Tindale, said yesterday that this had led to a strong field of entries.
A shortlist of 41 works has been selected from 199 entries, up on the 120 received last year.
The shortlist was selected by members of the Art Gallery Advisory Committee and this year's judge, Director of the Hawkesbury Regional Art Gallery, Kathleen Von Witt, will select the winner.
The official announcement will be made the opening of the Art Prize exhibition at the gallery on Friday at 6.30pm.
The annual prize has been running since 1994 and attracts entries from across Australia.
This year's winner will have their work acquired by the gallery for $15,000.
Shortlisted works will be exhibited until September 5.

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Talk to me, says Fiona

Originally published: Wednesday, 21st July, 2010

Senator Fiona Nash, Leader of the Nationals in the Senate, wants to talk to locals tomorrow.

Senator Nash will be in the city as part of her "Talk to Me Tour" of NSW. She will be in the town square from 10am until 11am.
The tour has so far taken in 40 towns. Senator Nash travelled extensively through New England and back down through northern and coastal NSW through April and May. More recently she visited the Central West and Riverina.
She said the tour had given people in country areasthe opportunity to talk to her and discuss issues affecting them and their families.
"It is very important to me in my role as a Nationals Senator to have a clear understanding of issues concerning regional people in their local communities," she said.
"Many issues have been raised with me during the tour, including health, education, infrastructure, telecommunications, the environment and the rising cost of living, as well as the more controversial issues surrounding the Labor Government's mining tax and their big spending, big taxing budget.
"The Nationals are for regional Australia and the families and businesses that live and work in those communities. We will continue to work towards closing the gap between the city and the community."

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Shinglebacks provide $2,000 for the kids

Originally published: Wednesday, 21st July, 2010

The Shinglebacks are in the final stages of completing orders from the four local football clubs for equipment for their juniors.
As part of the Shingleback charter each of the four clubs was invited to seek $500 worth of equipment.
North has received two medicine balls and several match Sherrin balls.
Central has taken receipt of some alternative training aids. The pop up nets will be used for running handball games that teach the kids about space, voice and quick reflexes (whilst running harder than they think).
Training bibs will assist this game whilst training ladders are now a popular warm up tool.
The Magpies also received 10 new water bottles and a carrier.
The West FC have ordered a junior ruck bag, hurdles and a training ladder whilst South have ruck and tackling bags ordered along with markers and ball bags.
Also on the donation radar for the Shinglebacks is the 2010 U/18 premiership cup, and trophies for the 12s, 14s and 16s team player of the final.
This year the Shinglebacks will also, at club level, present an award to each club for their junior player of the year.
Each of the four winners will receive a trophy and a $100 voucher to spend at a local store of their choice.

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Program offers students two sides of medicine

Originally published: Tuesday, 20th July, 2010

A brand new batch of medical students fresh from the city has arrived in Broken Hill, ready to experience everything outback medicine has to offer.

The four third year University of Wollongong students will have plenty of time to learn on the job - they have signed on for a 12 month placement.
They are the latest students to enter the Broken Hill Extended Clinical Placement Program run by the BH University Department of Rural Health (UDRH).
Under the program, students from Wollongong, University of Adelaide and University of Sydney spend between six and twelve months in Broken Hill.
The students, who split their time between a private practice and the hospital, as well as time within outlying centres, get to experience outback living and two distinct sides of medicine.
According to the UDRH, the 12 month duration allows students to form relationships with patients, experience continuity of care and learn from a wide range of health professionals.
It's also hoped that it could encourage a few of them to return to the bush to work.
The extended clinical placement program was officially launched by the Governor of NSW, Professor Marie Bashir, in June last year.
UDRH Medical Director Dr David Garne said since then the program had received positive feedback from students, who had expressed a desire to return and work.
But it will be at least another 12 months before any are able to return to Broken Hill, if they wish.
Honor Beck, the manager of student placement services, said that was because the students had to complete their first intern year before they could work at another hospital, as doctors, on rotation.
Yesterday, the latest students said they chose Broken Hill as their placement on the recommendation of previous students.
The opportunity to work in a unique location and experience a host of different fields of medicine was a major attraction for the students.
"I think that it's a very structured program as well, so that was appealing," said Libby Brewer, who, along with the rest of the group, was also looking forward to what the city had to offer socially.
The students said they were surprised by the size of their host city.
"It's bigger than I thought," said Kate Wagner.
Another student, Kirsten Williamson, said she "thought there would be more desert".
Dr Garne said the program would not be possible without the support from local medical practices, the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Maari Ma Primary Health and the Greater Western Area Health Service.

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Student leaders in USA

Originally published: Tuesday, 20th July, 2010

Broken Hill's Hayden Zammit and Cassie McEvoy have been amongst 300 fellow students from over 60 countries in Washington DC this week for the Global Young Leaders Conference.

The two students arrived in Arlington; Virginia America on July 11 to begin their journey and to represent Australia at the conference.
The Willyama High School Year 10 students have been discussing topics ranging from the importance of cross cultural communication to economics in the developing world.
Hayden and Cassie have also have had the opportunity to speak with various guest speakers including US Department of State Assistant Secretary, Jose W. Fernandez.
They described the conference in Washington DC as "fast-paced but inspirational" and have worked in groups with scholars from countries including Saudi Arabia, Ecuador and Thailand, among others.
They have visited the White House, international embassies, the Abraham Lincoln memorial, shopping precincts and the Smithsonian Institute.
Hayden and Cassie now move on to New York City for part two of the conference.

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South practice to reopen

Originally published: Tuesday, 20th July, 2010

A new medical practice will open in south Broken Hill in a matter of weeks.

The new service seeks to alleviate Dr Phillip Chapman's shock resignation, which has underlined the fragile state of the city's medical services, especially in the south.
Doctor Chapman - the only GP operating in the south - abruptly retired on Friday. He had been suspended from the medical register on Tuesday following a complaint. His patients were queued out the door yesterday as they sought to collect their medical records.
But the news came late yesterday that the Patton Street practice would be re-opened in a matter of weeks. It is understood Dr Chapman will not return and that The Outback Family Practice, run in Thomas Street by Dr Ros Menzies, will take the reins.
Priority will be given to patients left without a GP.
Broken Hill Program Manager for the Riverina Division of General Practice said former patients of Dr Chapman would still need to establish a relationship with the practice as it was a new enterprise.
Dr Chapman's resignation means there are now only four medical practices operating in the city. Dr Chapman was the only one who bulkbilled all his patients.
Ms Merritt said that would add to the strain Broken Hill was already under. The Division offers assistance to medical workforces and helps source doctors, as the city is classified as an area of need.
That's partly because there are so few doctors, so each has to see more patients than their metropolitan counterparts. It makes the loss of one a more serious proposition.
"Patients will need to contact other practices if they need to be seen. It will take everybody time to adjust," Ms Merritt said.
City Councillor Jamie Mitchell was relieved yesterday to hear a new practice was on its way. He is leading a push to revitalise the city's south. He wants the Patton Street shopping precinct - of which Dr Chapman was on the fringe - rebadged as the "Patton Village". Under that banner he hopes to inject more of a community atmosphere into the area.
"There are a lot of elderly people in the south and people that never go into the city," he said.
"There's a chemist here and it would be a shame if they had to take a bus to go to the doctor. It's a great relief to hear another doctor is coming."
Clr Mitchell grew up in Knox Street. He fondly remembers a childhood in the south, when he could go for a swim and see a doctor in his neighbourhood. He worries about the number of services that have been lost since then and has pledged his term as a Councillor to bringing some back.


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Greeney new Outback Open champion

Originally published: Tuesday, 20th July, 2010

Local golfer Jamie Greeney took full advantage of the great conditions and good weather to take out the Outback Open on the weekend.

Greeney claimed the 2BH Hill FM Outback Open, coming from two strokes behind to overhaul first round leader Rauri McDonald.
Golf and Country Club captain Peter Jeffrey said the win did not come easy for Jamie, who was up against a field of talented players, not only locals but visitors as well, and the course was playing the hardest it has all year.
McDonald has won this title in the past and has been runner up on occasions as well, and said he would return next year to try again.
Mr Jeffrey said the Outback Open is the city's biggest golfing event - 104 players played 36 holes over two days in "immaculate weather".
The B grade title left the city for the second time with Mildura golfer Steve Porter and local Garry Bourke won the C grade.
The ladies' competition was run over two grades. A number of ladies attended from Robinvale, Coomealla, Riverside and Mildura.
The condition of the course and the weather returned some great results on the first day, but by the completion of the final day it was favourite Michele Philp who took out A grade. B grade was won by Judy Edgecumbe.
"There was strong competition ... with a competitive A grade field," said Mr Jeffrey.



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Impressive engine

Originally published: Monday, 19th July, 2010

The 7th Triennial Junction Rally held last weekend saw a local man pick up a trophy for the best presented marine engine.

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Special day for Collin and Marjorie

Originally published: Monday, 19th July, 2010

Patience and understanding are important for a long-lasting marriage, according to Collin and Marjorie Tangey. 

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New seatbelt laws ensure children travel safely

Originally published: Monday, 19th July, 2010

By Sergeant Jeff Lahnor, Broken Hill Highway Patrol

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New campsite by popular demand

Originally published: Friday, 16th July, 2010

After many enquiries from tourists, City Council has started work on a camping ground in one of Broken Hill’s most famous tourism spots.

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Airline replies to “spurious accusations”

Originally published: Friday, 16th July, 2010

Regional Express and Sydney Airport continue to argue over a planned rise in airport fees.

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Foundation member back for Silverlea reunion

Originally published: Friday, 16th July, 2010

A founding member of Silverlea will be recognised when the organisation holds its 50th anniversary festivities next month. Fred Trebilcock, 86, who was also Silverlea’s f irst treasurer, will join other past and present staff and committee members at events to mark the anniversary.

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Local cadet on overseas mission

Originally published: Thursday, 15th July, 2010

Sixteen-year-old army cadet Hannah Licul is jetting off to the US as part of an overseas army cadet exchange program.

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New War Veterans' is taking shape

Originally published: Thursday, 15th July, 2010

The new War Veterans’ Hostel in Eyre Street
should be finished by the end of the year.
According to the CEO of Southern Cross Care, Allan
Carter, the Harold Williams home was “progressing as
hoped”.
Mr Carter said the project had picked up lost time after
the downpour in March when Broken Hill received
almost 100mm of rain.
Despite this the home is near 60 to 65 per cent complete
and roughly on budget, he said.
The home will accommodate 27 low-care residents
who now reside in the War Veterans’ Hostel in Thomas
Street. It will also have an additional 13 low-care beds.
The $10.5 million home situated next to the St Anne’s
Nursing Home has been partly funded with a $3.25 million
zero real interest home loan from the federal government.
Construction began in November last year and it is
hoped the home will be occupied in January next year.
Despite this week’s wild weather, Mr Carter said there
had been “no major issues” as almost all the building is
covered by the roof.
“Inclement weather doesn’t hold as big an issue as it
did at the start,” Mr Carter said.
He also said that during September the outer-shell of
the building will be complete meaning it can be locked
up.
“We’re very happy with the progress for all concerned,”
Mr Carter said.
“We’re especially happy we’re almost on budget.”

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The PCYC's tops for holiday fun

Originally published: Thursday, 15th July, 2010

Local primary school children yesterday took
part in a PCYC school holiday excursion that
included tennis, archery and having a good time.
Twenty-seven children made the most of the tennis
and had a go at archery in the second half of the day.
The PCYC supplied the kids with all the equiptment
and encouraged good sportsmanship and fair play.
PCYC Volunteer Colleen Walden said the regular
school holiday program was becoming very popular with
around 30 children attending daily.
“We’ve been booked out every day,” Ms Walden said.
The PCYC supplied morning tea and cooked a barbecue
for lunch. Those who decided not to play could do
other activities such soccer and reading.
“The older girls like reading,” she said.
The club takes the kids on excursions every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday during the school holidays to
various places around the city.

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Lizards triumph in Old Noarlunga

Originally published: Thursday, 15th July, 2010

The local Masters Boys made it eight straight wins with a come from behind win over the South’s AFL Masters on Saturday.
After a great bus trip to Adelaide, and a cold night at AAMI stadium that saw Collingwood overpower Port, the Shinglebacks woke (some with sore heads) to a cold gloomy, wild wintery day.
As the bus converged on Old Noarlunga Oval (the home of the Horseshoe) Captain Klingy gave his now traditional pre-match motivational speech that had everyone ready to play. Even Coach Rob Rule was shaking in his boots! The Shinglebacks somewhat stupidly agreed to South’s request to let a 23- year-old play, supposedly because he was not that great. Liars! South won the toss, kicked with the gale, and jumped to a 3 goal lead as the Lizards struggled to adjust to the wet track and windy conditions. To add to our woes, debutant Paul O’Brien limped off with a calf strain and moments later Sam Hocking was finished with a wonky knee. A late goal to Wayne Murray steadied the ship but at quarter time South led 3- 2 (2) to 1-2 (8). Coach Rule made the key move of the match with Dane D’Monte switched into the middle and suddenly with the gale behind the goals followed to D’Monte, Craig Thomas (two) and Scott Lawrence. The Lizards dominated the quarter with Alby Hoskins turning back the clock as he gave Jay Robins, Brad Pressler, Thomas and D’Monte an armchair ride in the middle. At half time the Lizards led 5-4 (34) to 5-3 (33). With 29 players on the books for the day including first gamers Craig Murkins and Dean Rogers, Coach Rule was getting RSI of the magnetic board. The premiership quarter saw Rule tighten up the back six with Robins moved to half back and Greg Hardy to CHB to assist Brett Morris who was getting leather poisoning again. Morris’s only concern was the threat of rain affecting his spray tan! In other moves Maurice Kumm was moved into the ruck with Hoskins moved to full forward. Both moves worked brilliantly as Kumm was everywhere and Hoskins pulled in two big grabs for goals against the wind. Further goals to Thomas and Lawrence and the Lizards had taken control of the game to lead 9-6 (60) to South 5.7 (37) with the locals only scoring 4 points with the wind. Despite the “footy for fun” motto the South boys were getting a little crude with their tackles. Dave Kuerschner (who played his best Shingleback game) and Garry Sandy both copped blows that were not in the spirit of Masters footy. The last quarter again was getting a little too serious and Frank Napoli let the local lads know we were not happy. Further goals to Murray and two to Jarrod
Burke and the Shinglebacks were nearly home.
Coach Rule then unleashed his two trump cards
with Rodney Garner being thrown in the guts to
win the hard ball. Garner, fresh from a 37-yearspell,
gave Hoskins the wink and on cue the
Lizards forward yet again.
Burke was dragged for kicking too many goals
and with 5 minutes to go the crowd erupted as
the runner, Peter Nash, ditched the jacket and
headed deep into the forward lines. Instantly a
brilliant lead by Nash was honoured by a bullet
like pass from Chocco Trengove, and as the
crowd hushed Nash calmly slotted home the best
goal of the day (just ask him).
Kumm nailed the team’s 14th and final goal to
see the Shinglebacks home 14-6 (90) to 7-7 (49).
None were better than D’Monte in the middle
with his kicking skills excellent given the wild
weather, Morris dazzled across half back with
his clean hands and positioning, along with
Robins who played 4 steady quarters. In the middle
Pressler and Thomas ran the opposition off
their legs whilst Todd Stevens and Lawrence
were good contributors. In the air Hoskins,
Trengove and Kumm dominated whilst Murray
and Geoff Lehman were key marking targets in
attack.
Every player did his bit and the encouragement
for each other is the reason they keep winning.
The after game function was a great success
with South’s keen to travel to BH in 2011.
As the bus rolled back into BH at 9pm Sunday
the Shinglebacks had broken new ground with a
road trip featuring Chameleons (partners) and
geckos (kids) rated a huge success.

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Wilcannia artists' show a hit

Originally published: Wednesday, 14th July, 2010

Artists from Wilcannia have had their work shown - and sold - in Sydney.

The Wilcannia Artists Exhibition is on show at the Brush Farmhouse Gallery in Eastwood until August 1, hosted by the city of Ryde.
The Central Darling Shire Council has an informal agreement of mutual assistance with Ryde, and has worked with West Darling Arts to hold the exhibition during NAIDOC Week.
The centrepiece is a series of Story Poles depicting Paakantji culture and mythology.
Lino-cut prints, paintings, worked wood, sculpture and drawings are also displayed.
Artists represented include Badger Bates, Eddy Harris, Waddy Harris, Anthony Harris, Murray Butcher, Roslyn Johnson and Kevin Cattermole.
Kym Fuller, Chairman of West Darling Arts (WDA), said the show was "fantastic" for all involved.
Efforts had been made to broaden the appeal of the "Wilcannia arts brand", he said, and an exhibition as tightly focussed as this was a big step.
WDA has been placing Artists in Residence in Wilcannia for six-odd years.
"Some of the works on display are a culmination of that. The people working here have come along greatly and the quality of work is now recognised in Sydney," Mr Fuller said.
Most of the works have been sold, which Mr Fuller said was great news for the fledgling artists.
"What we're trying to do is build a business basis around the creative side," he said.
"Where you have creative people who can make a living, you have engaged people, and people who are interacting with their community. That's good for the whole region."
The exhibition originally opened at the Hazelhurst Regional Gallery and Arts Centre in Gymea in November 2009 as part of their end of year program that attracted more than 3,000 visitors.


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Local mounts land speed challenge

Originally published: Wednesday, 14th July, 2010

A local Harley Davidson enthusiast is setting out to break a world record in land speed racing next year.

Phil Cvirn will take part in the Dry Lakes Racers Australia race at Lake Gairdner, a salt lake 160kms north of Whyalla.
"Quite a few years ago we heard about the Salt Lake Racing here in Australia, and it's a bit like what they do at Bonneville over in America, and so we went over there and got a bit interested in it," Mr Cvirn said.
His 1964 Harley Davidson, which has only a few original parts left, is officially the fastest Harle to run on the salt lake.
"A couple of years ago a team from America came out and they brought a couple of motorbikes out with them, and although their speeds couldn't be registered under Dry Lakes Racing Australia, I happen to know that one of the Harley Davidsons that they brought out ran a speed of about 172 miles an hour.
"And so I want to go back there and beat it."
The bike's best speed on the salt lake is 153 miles an hour, Mr Cvirn said.
This is the sixth time he has entered the five-day event, which has several hundred competitors
He will travel with 10 members of the Broken Hill Harley Riders Association.
Tony Everuss, who is a member of the club, said that the week was "full on."
"We'll go over as a group, as a support team. There will probably be about half a dozen club members, associates, and friends that will go over," Mr Everuss said.
He said that it wasn't so much about training, but courage.
"Phil's a real speed demon. I mean he's been around bikes all his life.
"He's sporting half a leg these days so he's got a bit of a handicap.
"Initially when he first went over there he was whole body, and he's been having a go ever since.
"It hasn't detered him," Mr Everuss said.
The group is also planning to do a sponsorship drive and is appealing to local businesses for help.
Anyone wishing to make donations can call Phil Cvirn on 0433 274 599 or Des Churnock on 0408 832 899.

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TV music show theme for concert fundraiser

Originally published: Wednesday, 14th July, 2010

A fundraiser being held on Friday is sure to delight music fans young and old.

The Spicks and Specks quiz night will be held at Club Legion and begins at 7pm.
The fundraiser has been modelled on the music quiz show "Spicks and Specks" and it will be set up like the television show with substitutes for Myf Warhurst and Alan Brough.
Ann Rogers, chairman of the Outback and All that Jazz Committee, said many local identities will be appearing on the night.
The money raised will go towards staging the festival.
The committee has changed the festival's name from Red Desert Live back to Outback and All that Jazz, as the public was  more familiar with it and it will help to clear up confusion, according Mrs Rogers.
"There has been good bookings with seats still available," she said.
"All walks of life will be attending the fundraiser."
The night will involve some great prizes and provide fantastic entertainment from local artists and musicians.
A drumming competition will also be held between two local drummers.
"We're hoping for a good turnout but we're very happy with the response from the Broken Hill community so far," said Mrs Rogers.
Anyone wishing to attend may contact Club Legion on 8087 4064. Bookings cost $10 and supper is included.
The Outback and All That Jazz committee will also hold another fundraiser in November.
So far the fundraiser is "top secret" but more information will be released as it gets closer to November.

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Race day draws in crowd from far and wide

Originally published: Wednesday, 14th July, 2010

The 60th anniversary Milparinka Gymkhana was held on Saturday.

Crowds were down from last year, mainly due to the bad weather, but club secretary Bernadette Maxwell said the numbers were about average.
She said last year's record crowd of 470 people was bolstered from a bicycle group coming through.
"Last year was a bumper year. We normally have about 200 people. We were still pretty happy with the crowd," Mrs Maxwell said.
"There were quite a few tourists this year and they were quite impressed with our little gymkhana and how we've got it set up.
"Some were families in the NSW school holidays coming to experience the bush."
The club was formed in November 1940 with first ever gymkhana held on New Year's Day in 1950.
The original Trustees were Keith Conners of Yandama station, Don Maxwell of Mt Shannon Station and Edward Keurschner of Peak Hill Station. Today sons and grandsons of these men are still members of our club.
Mrs Maxwell said it was not until 1970 that ladies were able to become members.
"Today there about 20 members."
Throughout the years there have been floods, rains and drought that have stopped the gymkhana being held.
This year in February and March about one metre of water flooded the sports grounds and left a few inches of silt throughout the club rooms.
"There were many busy bees this year to get the grounds ready for the day," Mrs Maxwell said.
She said one millimetre of rain fell on Saturday which allowed the kids to play in the mud.
"(That) did not dampen antibody's spirits, and made great mud for the kids to make mud pies and "mud angles"."
This year's gymkhana saw 43 horses and lots of kids riding, which Mrs Maxwell said was good for the future of the club.
"We do have lots of kids events. You get them interested young and they keep participating in gymkhanas and riding horses," she said.
"Not as many parents ride but they have a bit of fun - they're watching their kids ride and encouraging them."
Leading rider was Rodney Betts from Orientos Station in Queensland while the junior leading rider was Sally Halstead from Naryilco Station.
The president's encouragement award went to Charli Smith, aged 9, Cootawundi Station, White Cliffs.
"The president watches all the riders of the day and sees who's trying the hardest and trying to keep encouraging them to ride horses."
Mrs Maxwell said the crowd was well behaved.
"Our community's always really, really good," she said.
"We might live far apart in our community but we all get together and it's great to catch up each year.
"And because it's been such a good season so far this year everyone was ready to party and celebrate so that went well into the night and into Sunday morning."
While it will be some time before the club counts the final cash they are sure they'll be able to donate some money to local charities and the Tibooburra hospital.
"We're pretty confident we'll be able to send some donations that way."

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Hoon rubbed out for reckless stunt

Originally published: Tuesday, 13th July, 2010

A 24-year-old man's driver's licence has been suspended after he did a three-minute-long burnout.

Nearby residents witnessed the foolish act and reported the driver's identity to police.
Police said the man was driving in Ryan Street about 3.15pm on Sunday. At the intersection with Harris Street he performed a burnout, spinning the rear wheels of his 1989 Nissan Skyline.
Police said the vehicle produced a large amount of smoke and the tyres screeched as it travelled 30 metres down the wrong side of the street before veering to the left and performing a u-turn and travelling back the way it came.
All told, the burnout lasted between about three minutes and left black marks 220 metres long.
The driver fled from the scene but was later confronted by police at a Ryan Street house and charged with aggravated burnout.
His licence has been suspended until he appears in court on August 10.
A police spokesman said yesterday that such behaviour was very dangerous and he encouraged residents to report such acts.
"There's no way a driver has total control of the vehicle in these circumstances," he said.
"Any sensible person would understand this is dangerous, and if anyone witnesses an incident like this they should report it to police."

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Local poems, photos in online collection

Originally published: Tuesday, 13th July, 2010

A digital collection of poetry and photos celebrating the city's history will be launched on Friday.

The Broken Hill Regional Writers Centre is opening an "e-anthology" of writing and photography as part of its annual poetry festival.
Material from the 2009 Broken Hill Poetry Festival has been compiled and edited by poet-in-residence Les Wicks and local poets Barbara DeFranceschi and Marvis Sofield.

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Cut the volume

Originally published: Tuesday, 13th July, 2010

Young locals are being sought to have their hearing tested for damage caused by habitually listening to loud music.

Recent research has shown that going to nightclubs and listening to personal stereos on high volume can be as harmful to hearing as industrial noise.
Measurements made by the National Acoustic Laboratories (NAL) have shown that sound levels at a typical Sydney nightclub can range between 91 and 106 decibels.
Exposure to 100 decibels can cause hearing damage after only 15 minutes.
In a recent survey of 18 to 35-year-old, 10 per cent reported going to nightclubs once a week or more for between one and six hours each time,     their exposure exceeding the maximum allowable daily noise dose for industrial workers.
Add to this listening to personal stereos up high and you have what is being called by researchers "binge listening".
The effects are cumulative and it can take years for the damage to become obvious, they say.
The National Acoustic Laboratories is seeking local volunteers in the above age group to take part in hearing tests at the Broken Hill & District Hearing Resource Centre in Argent Street in September.
The tests will be carried out by qualified audiologists from the NAL and they are free and confidential.
Participants will get a comprehensive report on their hearing health.
Anyone who would like to take part, or receive more information, may call into the BH & District Hearing Centre and pick up a copy of the survey.
They may also email the NAL research team (ihear@nal.gov.au) or call (02) 9412 6962.  
Lyndal Carter, who will be conducting the research locally, will be a guest speaker at the "Hearing in the Hill" Silver Jubilee Seminar over the October long weekend.
The Volunteer Coordinator at the BH & District Hearing Resource Centre, Cath Bonnes, said all local clients of the centre, along with carers and professionals, were invited to attend the seminar.

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Poker racers brave the elements

Originally published: Tuesday, 13th July, 2010

Despite freezing conditions, 42 hardy cycllists competed in Saturday's poker race at Silverton.

Steve Chinner was named Poker Race Champion and took out the fastest over all time in the 12th annual Broken Hill Mountain Bike Club event.
After gusty 45 kilometre per hour winds and heavy rain, organisers were not even sure whether to set up.
But when the riders started turning up to help, the decision was made. It also helped that Jo and Chris had the BBQ cranked, and their special soup piping hot, which proved a hit with the crowd.
The mountain bike club's Shelley Clarke said the event was tough but was modified to make it more fun for the less serious.
"This is the most difficult event on our calendar, and is our only real endurance event for those who ride as individuals," Ms Clarke said.
"The introduction of a teams category injected some fun and entertainment into the event, with two of the teams dressing to impress!"
This allows teams to ride one lap each, and brings a whole new dimension to the event.
The social class had just one rider and, amazingly, he managed to crank out his laps before he discovered he has been riding with a busted frame, Ms Clarke said.
In the junior girls category, the Lenton sisters were back in the saddle with Kirstie able to hold off Alexis to take the win.
Boys B consisted of Doyle, Max and Patrick; and there was some confusion over which track they were riding, but they all did very well under tough conditions to get their five cards.
Boys A showed a very gutsy effort by both Corey and Luke, Ms Clarke said.
"Corey set a new junior record to be the first Broken Hill junior to complete his five laps on the Heritage Trail," she said.
"Luke completed three laps, even though he had a couple of stacks which resulted in a tooth through his lip."
Megan Algate was the only local female who was up to the solo challenge and posted very consistent lap times for her first poker race. This demonstrated her high level of fitness and determination.
Veteran Men was always going to be hotly contested, and attracted some of the big guns from the club.
The top three were only split by seconds, and they battled for the front for the first two laps before David was able to cement his lead into the third.
Heppy also pumped out his five very consistent laps and behind him was Dennis Robinson, who made the trip up from Renmark.
Dennis showed determination and was able to complete his five laps, which is quite an achievement.
Mark made the leap from social class into this category and was able to produce four very respectable laps for his first poker race.
Men's B claimed some casualties with Nick having to withdraw with an injury he sustained during training, and Stevo and Phil calling it a day after three laps.
This left Wayne, Joel and Richard to take the podium places.
Men's A was a hotly contested category, with Benny, Royce and ex-local Steve Chinner all pegged as favourites.
Benny led for the first lap but was taken by Royce and Steve crossing together in the second. Brian wasn't far behind, followed closely by Les and Tas.
Steve was able to take the lead into the third lap, over Royce and Benny; and this was how they finished.
Brian was also able to complete consistent laps to hold off Les and Tas.
Teams were introduced this year and were a highlight of the day.
A mix of Central Firefighters and partners (Passme Ilkilya), Perilya (Where's Wally?) and Country Energy and Family (Bondi Rescue) lined up to compete, and some went that extra mile to put on a visual demonstration on bad dress sense!
This category was a great chance for those riders who wanted a bit of fun, and a challenge - only having to complete one lap (in theory this didn't work out for John, who was called away before he could complete his lap; so Phil had to complete two laps).
This was pretty close, with Where's Wally leading for the first lap, until Bondi Rescue overtook in the second lap.
Passme Ilkilya must also be commended for the two ladies that filled the team at last minute for the two Firies that had to withdraw. This was a mammoth effort and they should be very pleased with their effort.
We hope to see them in the future because they would be a welcome addition the ladies class.
After the event the presentation was held and it was revealed that the best poker hand of the day went to Benny Goodman.
Fastest overall time and Poker Race Champion for 2010 went to Steve Chinner.


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Cath, 90, wants to wear out, now rust away

Originally published: Monday, 12th July, 2010

One of the city's best known identities, Catherine Bonnes, has just celebrated two milestones.

Last week she clocked up 25 years of work with the same organisation and celebrated her 90th birthday.
Ms Bonnes turned 90 on Wednesday and continues to work at the Broken Hill & District Hearing Resource Centre five days a week.
"Look, when you retire and you've got a good active brain do you sit in a corner and degenerate and rot?" Ms Bonnes asked.
"I'd rather wear out than rust away."
She said that if a lot more people felt like that they would be better off.
"I enjoy what I do. The people that come to you enjoy someone else to talk to."
The Hearing Centre had its first Hearing Awareness Week in 1985 at the plaza, where the then mayor Peter Black and several others helped raise awareness for the cause.
"And from then on we've just grown."
The group originally met in various houses or the YMCA building. Then City Council loaned them the old Railwaytown Post Office.
The centre then moved into the Burke Wall Hall before recently relocating to 187-189 Argent Street.
Ms Bonnes said she was in her fifties when she lost her hearing through an infection called Polyneuritis.
She said that she had once contemplated taking her own life because "life just got to difficult and miserable."
"There was no help for me. I was told to go home and learn to live with it. But you wake up one morning and find out you can't hear, how do you learn to live with it?
"So that is what made me do this and made me do something."
Ms Bonnes said her birthday on Wednesday was an "all day, all night" celebration.
She had lunch with colleagues at work before going out with family and friends for tea at a restaurant.
"It was nice, lovely, a beautiful evening."
Apart from her achievements at the centre, Ms Bonnes was awarded the Order of Australia in 2000, the Centenary Medal in 2003, and was a member of the National Disability Advisory Council.
Ms Bonnes says she has no plans to retire and hopes to continue on a lot longer doing what she is doing.
"It depends. I have some major health problems, whether they catch up with me or don't, but until I feel that I can't do this or until someone else says to me 'you're a pain in the neck,' I will stay here."

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Research to show grazing impacts

Originally published: Monday, 12th July, 2010

After five years of research at Fowlers Gap, scientist Adam Munn is ready to present his findings on the impacts of native, domestic and feral grazing.

Mr Munn has been working out of the University of NSW's Fowlers Gap arid-zone research station, which is 110 kilometres north of Broken Hill on the Silver City Highway. He will give a public talk on his results there on Sunday morning.
One of his principle projects sought to establish large-scale grazing plots so that different grazing scenarios can be examined, particularly in light of mixed-grazed systems.
"When we compared sheep and kangaroos, both in a large enclosure and out in the free range environment, we found that contrary to what previous estimates have been, which is that one kangaroo equals 70 percent of a sheep, one kangaroo really equals about 30 or 40 percent of a sheep," Mr Munn said.
The figures are based on the animal's energy use and food and water intake.
"On average, the sheep on the saltbush diet were drinking about 12 litres of water a day and kangaroos about one and a half," he says.
The goal was not to replace sheep with kangaroos, according to Mr Munn, but to learn an manage the two together.
"At the very least, we're aiming to gather information necessary for people to make informed decisions about how they run their properties," he said.
Geoff Laan, Director of Planning and Environment at Broken Hill City Council, said scientific research could help develop effective management plans.
"There's a very real need for scientific development and research to continue," he said.
Nicole Payne, Assistant Director and North West Manager of the Kangaroo Management Program for the Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water said the sharing of scientific information around Fowlers Gap had been limited until now.
"There's a big yawning gap between what the scientists know and talk to each other about and what filters down to the level of people who are making on the ground decisions," he said.
"The upcoming Fowlers Gap information event will be a chance to discuss ideas and future research projects that benefit local land managers and the community," says Munn.
Mr Munn extended an invitation to everyone interested in his findings to come along to his talk on Sunday at 10am in the Fowlers Gap shearers' quarters.


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Dentist finalist in State awards

Originally published: Monday, 12th July, 2010

Staff from The Dental Centre on Iodide Street spent the weekend in Sydney as finalists in the Telstra NSW Business Awards. The nomination in the Social Responsibility category recognised, not only solid business success, but the charitable and community work done by The Dental Centre.

The Dental Centre was represented by Dr Simon Sweet and eight members of staff. Unfortunately, the practice principal, Dr Greg Cocks, is in Europe doing specialist training.

The Dental Centre was recognised for providing excellence in patient care with state-of-the-art facilities available in only a small number of dental practices in Australia, usually in the CBD’s of major cities.

Its work in a number of other areas was also crucial. Such as providing education and oral health screening in pre-schools and nursing homes; areas which miss out on public health funding. There is also a long-running outreach program to remote rural communities and orphanages in Bali established by a charity in 2005. The Dental Centre also hosts tertiary healthcare students from Sydney and Adelaide and the experience it offers has led graduates to consider rural options when starting their careers. The business also developed an accreditation program for hygienists in order to retain trained professional staff.

 Dr Cocks was also instrumental, many years ago with Smiley Johnson, in establishing the dental service at Maari Ma Aboriginal Health Corporation. They now have a five strong dental team serving Broken Hill, Menindee, Wilcannia and Ivanhoe.

Although the team did not win the big state award on the night, The Dental Centre has done Broken Hill proud in getting a local family business recognised state-wide.

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The Magpie machine steamrolls the Roos

Originally published: Monday, 12th July, 2010

After 12 rounds Central are still undefeated - and if Saturday's match against South is any indication of their power and form, they will remain that way.

South refused to man up when they lost possession or when the ball was in dispute, and this cost them. Central are a team that makes the most of their opportunities.
They marched on to kick 12-11 (83) to South's 5-8 (38), a 45-point win.
Central brought in junior Jack Roberts for his first match. Roberts looks the goods and the Magpies seem to keep producing.
Coach Jarred Hinton started with Ben Perkins on the ball taking the first bounce with good affect.
Central kicked four goals in the first quarter as South found it hard going against the avalanche.
Central's confidence and belief in one another was already quite evident as their forwards Lyndon Cox, Curtis Jelbert, big strong Jamie Keenan, and Ben Perkins when moved off the ball were putting South's back men under huge pressure.
What I like about the Central players whether back, forward or centre is that they chase and harass to get the ball back when losing or trying to gain possession.
This is a trait of their game, and all other clubs should take notice.
South manned the dangerous Justin Heath up with Wes Judd who stuck to his task all match and evened the ledger, so too speak.
South continued to push forward but their top ball winner of previous matches, Heath Caldwell, found it hard to get into the match. James McClure was spoiling his day.
Marcus O Brien was South's best all match with run and long and accurate kicks. He kicked South's first goal mid way through the second quarter.
South were relentless with attack through Staker, Neal and O'Brien but were equalled by Matt Sowden, Ben Camilleri and Digby Schinkel.
Central kept playing the basics; nothing fancy, just playing in front, chasing and manning up when needed and kicking and handballing accurately to a teammate.
South seemed to listen to coach Robert Hickey who reminded them it was time to man up and be accountable for your man at all times.
They kicked four goals after half time but Central kicked five and kept the pressure on the young Roos.
Central are versatile. They moved Matt Sowden into the forward line for two quick goals. Maybe he can cement his place there when they find it hard to kick goals but that I doubt it with the likes of Cox, Keenan, Perkins, Gepp and Jamie Berg to return.
I thought South had an opportunity to defeat Central on Saturday, but the form and attitude Central are showing will be hard to beat by all sides.
Scoreboard:
Central 4-3  7-8  8-9  12-11 (83)
South   0-3  1-4  2-7  5-8 (38)
Best players:
Central -  L Cox, B Mannion, J Keenan, K Wilmore, J McClure, M Sowden.
South - M O'Brien, P Neal, J Staker, W Judd.
Goalkickers:  
Central - B Perkins 3, J Keenan 3, M Sowden 2, L Cox 2. C Jelbert 2.
South - M. O'Brien, A Bird, M Purcell, T Boland, J Staker.
B Grade:
South 5-10 d Central 2-4

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Sturt Park hosts a day of fun

Originally published: Friday, 9th July, 2010

Yesterday children and adults headed to Sturt Park for a bit of fun, football and face painting as part of the annual NAIDOC Week activities.

"It's about our people", said Maureen O'Donnell, an Aboriginal elder.
"It's a week that recognises Aboriginal people and celebrates our people."
Maari Ma worker Codi King said that NAIDOC Week was also about black and white getting together and connecting with one another.
"(It's about) everyone coming together and us Aboriginal people being recognised," she said.
Sandra White, a Narungga woman, said that while the celebrations were a "good start" much needed to be done to address issues such as inequality.
"I experience prejudice on a weekly basis," she said. "It is hopefully the start of equality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.
"We'll never have equality but you can hope, can't you?"
Maari Ma worker Lisa Kickett said that steps could be taken by everyone to "close the gap"
"I think more understanding of each other, accepting the past and trying to look ahead for a new future," she said.

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Journey back to the Lakes

Originally published: Friday, 9th July, 2010

It's been a long time since retired surveyor Keith MacKenzie has seen the Menindee Lakes, but now he's returned to see what he helped build.

The Menindee Lakes Water Storage Scheme was constructed by the NSW government to connect the natural lakes and the Darling River with weirs, levees, channels and regulators.
That scheme helped secure the water supply for Broken Hill.
Mr MacKenzie worked as a surveyor from 1951 to 1953 on the Menindee Lakes Scheme and this week he returned with his son, grandson and granddaughter to see the lakes.
"After I finished my apprenticeship, I went to the country and joined the Irrigation Commission for three months, and then, because there were lots of surveyors in Menindee, they sent me up here to start a survey party and do work on the top water level," Mr MacKenzie said.
He was 21 when he started work on the scheme and had a team of three including a cook.
During his two-year stay Mr MacKenzie lived in a tent on the river bank.
"It was very interesting, I learnt lots of things."
The idea for the trip back came from his son Andrew who lives in Sydney, and has two children of his own.
"We came back because Andrew suggested it. He had spent a little time out here and thought it'd be nice at my age to go back and have a look at it, where I use to work."
He also said that it gave his grandchildren a chance to see the outback.
Andrew said that his father had found on a map where he used to camp, and hoped to go back and find the etchings made on the trees by he and his crew.
"I've always liked this part of the world, it's pretty unique, and everybody should see it really," said Keith.
"I'm really pleased I can come back and have a look at the town again.
"One interesting part of living in the community was that we use to play a lot of cricket.
"We had two teams, one was called the Menindee, the other was the Scorpions. The Menindee side were more... upper class people, and the Scorpions were the workers. I used to play for both."
He said that on occasion they would play cricket in Broken Hill but the Irrigation Commission wouldn't let the workers use their car to drive into town.
"If we wanted to come out we had to catch the goods train. It wasn't very easy to get in there not having a vehicle of my own."
When he did make it to town, Mr MacKenzie stayed at the Royal Exchange Hotel.
Keith MacKenzie is 80 years old now and lives in Newcastle but the Menindee memories are still fresh.
"It was a good experience and I'll never forget it."

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Home in on these mutts

Originally published: Friday, 9th July, 2010

These lovable mutts are looking for caring homes.

RSPCA animal attendants Cheryl Backhouse and Steffanie Oxford said their charges, all under two years of age, were cute and lovable and needed a home with "lots of love".
They said some of the dogs, like Ben the black spaniel who is lively and excitable, would be more suited to a younger owner, while Baby, a mixed terrier, would be a good companion for someone older.
The two, along with Buddy the black and white bitsa, terrier Toby and Sneaky, a Maltese, are available for purchase.
The dogs will be desexed and vaccinated and are looking for homes now.

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An eye for detail

Originally published: Thursday, 8th July, 2010

Renowned Australian photojournalist Robert McFarlane spoke last night about his ability to capture the still image.

With more than four decades of experience Mr McFarlane said the secret to great storytelling through photography was about capturing a moment in time.
"It's observation," Mr McFarlane said.
"Nothing is ever trivial.
"Respect the little things people do because that's where the interesting things are."
For 40 years Mr McFarlane has captured Australia's social issues and documented performance in film and theatre. He was a photography critic for 20 years and now is a commentator with his own blog.
His "Received moments - photography 1961-2009" exhibition is now on show at the Regional Art Gallery.
The exhibition uses known and ordinary Australians to relive 50 years of Australia's work, play and life.
McFarlane pointed to one of his photographs of a woman at work in front of a sewing machine. He said it was the detail that made the picture.
"(You're looking for) a picture with some sort of endearing truth," he said.
"Her jaw is set tight. It's a bugger of a job, sewing."
Mr McFarlane said people often failed to get a great image because they forgot about the simple things.
"They try to create professional portraits," he said.
"(But) actuality is too important to muck with.
"The divinity is in the details when the photography is ordinary."
He said gaining access to a private space to capture a person was a privilege that came with rewards if treated correctly.
"It's a privileged space; a privileged access to the subject," Mr McFarlane said.
"It's a moment when you have that ... it has to be respected."
The exhibition showcases a number of photographs of Aboriginal people, including the late activist Charles Perkins.
Mr McFarlane said he had no idea what photo he wanted to get of Charles, the first Indigenous graduate from Sydney University, but told him to "ignore me".
"I didn't know what I wanted. I just followed him," he said.
"I said 'I just want to observe you - just ignore me', which he did very well.
"You have to recognise what you've never seen.
"You have to understand, feel and simply observe the subject. That's where the pictures are."
Mr McFarlane could not make the opening of his exhibition early last month but appreciated the invitation to come and speak at the gallery last night.
"The idea behind me being here is that it's important that communicators or artists speak further," he said.
"One of the things when this exhibition was originally (designed) as a touring art show was that someone out there is going to say 'I can do that' or 'I can do that better', which is pretty much what happened to me."
Mr McFarlane said photography still challenged him; he has been taking photos while in the city and is working with author Jenny Middlemiss on the subject of mental illness.
"(That has been) saddening, challenging and funny and sometimes you photograph through tears ... because that's what happens," he said.
"But I (think) I'm in the right place, doing the right thing at the right time."
He uses and carries with him his "trusty digital" a standard, pocket-sized point and shoot but also uses Canon digital SLR cameras for work.
Over his career he has used a mix of cameras including Canon, Nikon and Leica. But Mr McFarlane moved to Canon when, he said, in 1986 they changed the way photos were taken.
"Canon revolutionized things in 1986 when they brought out a camera with a light metre. Then I switched to Canon," he said.
"I think digital is terrific. The quality is amazing, particularly in low light."
Mr McFarlane said he wanted his images to touch people.
"They are accurate and they are not manipulated - or if they are it's very minor - 'sit by a window or don't move,'" he said.
"I hope the pictures strike a chord because ... these pictures are history - a lot of dead people here - some of them were my friends."

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Kenya's flying surgeon drops in

Originally published: Thursday, 8th July, 2010

An African Flying Doctor surgeon has visited the local RFDS base during a two-week trip to Australia to learn how we do things here.

Dr John Wachira is a member of the African Medical Research Foundation (AMREF) and before arriving in the city her spent time at North Shore Hospital in Sydney.
Dr Wachira said he was "briefed by the nursing manager on how things work here,"
and shown all the areas of the RFDS.
Executive assistant Barbara Ellis said that the trip will let Dr Wachira take the knowledge he's learnt back to Kenya and use it there.
As a surgeon, Dr Wachira makes visits to remote areas and his organisation covers 150 hospitals in African seven countries.
AMREF owns four planes, three caravans and one small Cesna 206 which are all used in medical response.
After 20 years as a surgeon, Dr Wachira said he gains much satisfaction at seeing the difference the African Flying Doctor service makes to many under-privledged people's lives.
He said that he would "definitely have to come back to Australia," as the "time was too short to visit this beautiful country."
The doctor said he had not even seen a kangaroo!

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Students get dirt on worms

Originally published: Thursday, 8th July, 2010

Worms and sustainable living were the hot topic yesterday when University of NSW students visited Australia Vermiculture.

Twenty-two students and four staff members visited the site yesterday which is the country's largest worm farm.
Post and undergraduate students were shown how the farm works by Vermiculture's owner, Brendon Price, and how waste from all parts of the country is brought into town and turned into healthy soil.
Louise Fowler-Smith, an artist, senior lecturer and director of Imaging the Land International Research Institute (ILIRI) from Uni NSW's College of Fine Arts, said the course was a "multi-disiplined one."
"The aim of the course is to promote new ways of perceiving the land so that people start to change the way they live," Ms Fowler-Smith said.
"It's very experimental."
Students from Design, Fine Arts, Science, Engineering and Architecture faculties took part in the trip.
Ms Fowler-Smith said that the course looks at new ways of creating beauty that doesn't use "so much water," along with looking at alternative architecture and  energy.
She said that a lot of people in Broken Hill wanted old English gardens with roses and lawns, but this wasn't the place for it.
BH Art Exchange founder Susan Thomas praised the University for coming to Broken Hill for the trip.
"In terms of having links to the university, it potentially offers educational opportunities, tourism opportunities and information about environmental sustainability," Ms Thomas said.
She said that the Art Exchange had long been in a partnership with the University of NSW College of Fine Arts and the ILIRI research initiative.
It's the second time University students have made the trip
Next week they will be stationed at Fowlers Gap which where Ms Fowler-Smith has established a 'Creative Laboratory' for artists, scientists, architects and people concerned with the environment.
Ms Fowler-Smith will give a talk at the Palace Hotel tonight at 7:30 for people interested in environmental sustainability.



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Photographers vision to capture Australia

Originally published: Wednesday, 7th July, 2010


Robin Sellick wants to take a picture of Australia, and he wants to do it in Broken Hill.

He's putting together a book of photographs to give "an Australian view of Australian life", using Broken Hill as the cast and the location.
A renowned portrait photographer, Mr Sellick has captured subjects such as Julia Gillard, Steve Irwin and Kylie Minogue. His work has appeared in international magazines such as Rolling Stone and Vogue. He was born in Broken Hill and is now living here again.
He plans to assemble a series of portraits, with subjects drawn from every corner of the local community, along with a few landscapes.
Mr Sellick believes Broken Hill provides a pure vision of Australian culture.
Living in Sydney comes with a concrete barrier between person and environment, he says.
That, coupled with the Australian tendency to look outside for inspiration, led to a weakening of Australian identity. It's an identity that Mr Sellick cherishes, and one he believes is alive and strong in Broken Hill.
"I've always believed - and I don't know if this is a subjective thing - that Australia is becoming more like Broken Hill every day. Australia is dealing with things that Broken Hill has always dealt with," he said.
Some of the biggest problems now facing the country, such as the availability of water and the balancing act inherent in a multicultural society, were old hat for Silver City locals, Mr Sellick said.
And while there was still a way to go, initiatives such as the Maari Ma Health Service showed the city was ahead on indigenous issues.
Fighting for a fair go from mining companies is high on the political agenda at the moment, and that's nothing new for Broken Hill either.
Broken Hill's isolation and strong-willed union background had allowed the place to evolve on its own as a pure example of Australian life, Mr Sellick said.
"Because of that isolation, the volume is turned up on the aesthetic here - it's a town of big personalities.
"Here you can be yourself as loudly as you want to be."
The uniqueness of the city and its residents was a major selling point, and Mr Sellick sees his book presenting that to an international audience.
"People feel the need to apologise for their uniqueness, but we should put that up front."
Australia could learn a lot from Broken Hill, he said.
"Generally as Australians we look outward to see what we should be doing. We don't often trust our gut - we see what America is doing and then we do that," he said.
Australia's tendency to look outward for guidance ignored the way people were shaped by their surroundings.
"You often hear discussions about the effect that people are having on the environment. What must be equally important is the effect the environment has on the people.
"Australia has an incredibly rich environment, and we can't ignore the effect that has on the people living in it.
"What kind of people are grown in this environment? We're an adolescent country and we think we know everything. Broken Hill is much older mentally, and much tougher. The community has been aged by the harsh conditions," said Mr Sellick.
"We live closer to the environment than people in Sydney and other major cities, who pour concrete everywhere to get away from it. It think that teaches us a lot.
"I don't think people in Broken Hill are unaware of this, but maybe they don't fully realise the importance and value of their uniqueness in the world.
"When I first started photographing celebrities I thought they must be fascinating. As I went along though I learned that the people I grew up around in Broken Hill were much more interesting."

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Cold gets a grip

Originally published: Wednesday, 7th July, 2010

Locals who have been braving icy temperatures since winter began last month will welcome forecasts the chilly weather is expected to ease by the end of the week.

Since Friday, the city has endured lows of between 5.5 and 2 degrees, matched with highs of between 12 and 14.7 degrees.
On Monday night, residents slept through overnight temperatures of 2 degrees, and woke to a temperature of just 1.8C.
Local weatherman Phil Mew said the conditions were "reasonable temperatures for winter," but that it will get "gradually warmer."
"Between now and Friday, probably the weather will be the same to what we have outside," Mr Mew said.
Next week will see the temperature hit highs of 16 and 17 degrees, four degrees higher than the average maximums recorded over the past weeks.
Mr Mew said the reason for the current weather conditions were partly due to a general lack of wind amongst other things.
When that cloud clears up during the evening, the heat diffuses back into the atmosphere, and allows the ground temperatures to get down very low, which is why temperatures have been reasonably low.
He also said that there may be a possibility of rain over the weekend "if we're lucky".
Mr Mew suggested this time of the year was perfect for cooking in the kitchen.
"This is when its a good time for people to get into their kitchen and make up a big saucepan of soup, enough for three or four meals."
Winter is also the most common time for house fires.
Regional general manager of Country Energy Guy Chick said there are a number of things people can do to prevent household fires and accidents with appliances during the colder months.
"Country Energy is encouraging the community to ensure appliances such as electric blankets and heaters are tested by a licenced professional for use this winter," Mr Chick said.
"Not only can a faulty appliance be dangerous but it could be inefficient and costing you more than it should."

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Power fix close

Originally published: Wednesday, 7th July, 2010

Upgrades to power infrastructure in the city centre will allow for more options if the worst should happen.
Country Energy is updating its ageing infrastructure providing a back up power supply and giving it more options when things go wrong. It is also allowing for the current and future power needs of the city.
"It gives us better supply options," regional manager Guy Chick said.
The $800,000 project, which is being funded partially by increases in power costs, will see a substation built and power placed underground across the Sulphide Street road near the State Government Office block.
Mr Chick said the upgrade works would benefit the business precinct from around Bromide Street to Sulphide Street.
"We're installing new underground powerlines and a new high voltage substation in Sulphide Street, providing increased power capacity for those local businesses and residents," Mr Chick said.
"The upgrade will improve the reliability of the area's power supply, providing a reliable back up option for us to send electricity from a different direction in case of an emergency."
Meanwhile, City Council saw the opportunity to upgrade the road and footpath along Sulphide Street while the electrical works were being carried out.
Broken Hill Mayor Wincen Cuy said the footpath was uneven and, as it was a high volume traffic area, it was considered worthwhile.
"While Country Energy upgrades the electricity supply in Sulphide Street, Council will be completing the trenching and road restoration works, taking this opportunity to install new footpaths and beautify the streetscape," Mayor Cuy said.
"The path was not in line, it's a high volume area and we had the allocation (of funds) to do that."
Country Energy said it would minimise power outages or road blockages were it could.
"A small number of localised power interruptions may be required to complete the work safely, however these are also planned for outside of business hours to minimise the impact, and any customers affected will be notified before they occur," Mr Chick said.
"Country Energy apologises for any inconvenience caused by construction, and reassures customers in the affected area that once the work is complete, which we expect to be by the end of August, they'll benefit from a more robust and supported power supply."
Work is expected to be completed by the end of next month.

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Local lads impress

Originally published: Wednesday, 7th July, 2010

Broken Hill representatives Jayden Kelly and Ben Camilleri further enhanced their football credentials at the SA Country Football Championships.

Despite the Northern Zone being winless at the annual event, both made a play for the best rural player in SA and the Silver City at Berri last weekend.
North Broken lad Kelly, who has played reserves SANFL football for the Bulldogs, was part of the mid field rotations, while 19-year-old Ben Camilleri played out of a back pocket.
This was the first time in three years Broken Hill footballers have participated in this carnival.
Previously the Broken Hill Football League has been aligned to the Eastern Zone, but they were moved across to the Northern Zone at the start of this year.  
Northern Zone team coach Adrian Davies said he saw Jayden "as one of our five best players over the course of the weekend".
"His skills were good and he quickly adjusted to the quicker pace of the game at this level," he said.
"He was certainly our best game in the full game on Sunday."
Davies described north Broken Hill teenager Camilleri's effort in defence as serviceable, especially when you considered the extra pressure the side's backline was under over the three games.
"Both these lads are young and they were among eight under 21 players who we had in our combination," Davies continued.
"We are looking to do what a number of other teams at this level do and get a group of players who come together regularly at the event.
"Despite not claiming a victory, there were still many positive signs to come out of the weekend. Both Jayden and Ben are a part of the plans for the future.
"It is important the Northern Zone become highly competitive in the next couple of years."
Playing the first game of the tournament, the Northern Zone wsd blown out of the water by Central in the first 20 minutes of the abridged game, but were competitive in the second half, going down by 31 points.
The same issue appeared in the second contest, letting 2009 finalists Eastern jump them, before being more competitive in the second stanza.
They lost their last game against Eyre Peninsula on Sunday morning by 65 points.
Another Broken Hill footballer Cody Howard was unable to be considered for the 2010 SA Country football Championships due to injury.
The 2011 South Australian Country Football Championships will return to Port Pire.

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NAIDOC week launch

Originally published: Tuesday, 6th July, 2010

A flag raising ceremony opened NAIDOC Week yesterday at the Entertainment Centre and it was well received by locals and visitors alike.

This year's theme - Unsung Heroes - recognises the part played by the quiet achievers.
The flag raising ceremony was opened by John Harris, the partnership community project officer for NSW Department of Aboriginal Affairs for Broken Hill and Menindee.
Taunoa Bugmy welcomed everyone and acknowledged the contribution of Aboriginal Australians and non-Indigenous Australians.
Mayor Wincen Cuy said he was pleased to be a supporter of NAIDOC week, saying locals can learn from each other.
"We learn from the past, taking into the future what we have learnt," he said.
"It is very important to acknowledge the Aboriginal people in our community.
"The road forward is as bright and positive for the Indigenous people as it is for the rest of the community."
Despite the hope of warmer weather, Mayor Cuy wished everyone all the best and for their week of celebrations.
The Australian, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags were then raised by Kate Pittaway, Barb Clark and Chantal Bates-Daldon. They will fly all week.
Sandra Clark, from the Wilyakali tribe, said she was very excited by the celebrations and was happy with the theme of NAIDOC week.
"I love the theme of it... we have a lot of people who are unrecognised for what they do. Without them our communities wouldn't survive," she said.
Mrs Clark also said it is important to acknowledge the young ones in the Aboriginal community.
"Our younger ones are the future and we need them."
The ceremony attracted visitors such as David and Corinne Kirchen, from Northern Rivers near Ballina NSW. The couple thought the ceremony was lovely and they both liked the idea of the three flags.
Corinne said it was good to see something being done to join the community together.
City Council's General Manager Frank Zaknich hoped the celebrations this year will be as successful as last year.
The celebrations will continue on Thursday with the "Mutual Walk of Respect" which will start in the town square at 10am and end in Sturt Park where NAIDOC Week's annual "Day in the Park" will take place.

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McGowan house fire

Originally published: Tuesday, 6th July, 2010

The fire brigade, police and the ambulance were called to a house fire in McGowen Street later yesterday afternoon.

Neighbours said that the rental property had been unoccupied for some time, and that a new tenant had moved in about a week earlier.
Fireman entered the house to check for hot spots, but as yet have no idea what caused the fire.


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Careers grant scrapped

Originally published: Tuesday, 6th July, 2010

The elimination of a $1500 start-up grant would not stop locals from becoming professional carers, according to Family Day Care coordinator Donna Gaiter.

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Sydney exhibition honour for top class art pupils

Originally published: Monday, 5th July, 2010

Selected Broken Hill High School students have been given "the chance of a lifetime" to exhibit their work in a gallery in Sydney.

BHHS Year 12 Visual Art students will be showing work that was completed as part of their end of Year 11 "body of work".
A number of students will also be exhibiting copies of their photographs that will be part of their HSC Visual Arts body of work.
The students' exhibition will be held at the Seek Gallery in Sydney and opens on Saturday, July 24.
Clark Barrett, the head teacher of Creative Arts and HSC Visual Art teacher, said it was an "amazing opportunity".
Mr Barrett said his current year 12 students were the best he had taught so far.
"My current year 12 students are possibly the most talented group that I have ever taught," he said.
"It is a great year for it to happen."
While in Sydney, the students will also get a chance to experience many of the concepts covered in the HSC Visual Arts syllabus.
Mr Barrett said a "behind the scenes" view of Sydney has also been organised.
The students will be given a guided tour of the Art Gallery of NSW, Museum of Contemporary Art and the Brett Whiteley Studio.
They will also be taking a ferry to Cockatoo Island to see the Sydney Biennale exhibition. A visit to the Power House Museum has also been organised.
On top of all of this, students will be given the chance to visit the Sydney Opera House, Paddy's Market, Chinatown, and the Pitt Street Shopping Mall.
A tour of the Sydney University College of the Arts (SCA) campus in Roselle has also been organised. Mr Barrett said three recent BHHS students have gone on to study art at the SCA.
Besides a tour of the art studios at the college, staff will instruct the students in how to create a portfolio for use in applying to art schools.
"This should prove useful, as many of our former students have gone into various tertiary arts courses across the country such as Media Studies, Cinematography and Graphics/Digital Design," said Mr Barrett.
"This is literally a chance of a lifetime for our students."

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The Paul Kelly Cup had the man himself

Originally published: Monday, 5th July, 2010

Broken Hill's junior footballers rubbed shoulders with one of the AFL's all-time greats last week when Paul Kelly paid a visit to the city.

The Brownlow medallist and multiple Sydney Swans Best and Fairest winner was in the city as part of his ambassadorial role with the AFL's new Greater Western Sydney (GWS) team.
During his stay he worked with the local GWS Academy players on Thursday, before signing autographs and umpiring at the annual Paul Kelly Cup and Spring Cup football carnivals on Friday.
The two Cup competitions featured junior and senior teams from all the local primary schools, with players showing great determination in the cold and gusty conditions.
Mr Kelly said it had been a pleasure to take part in the gala football atmosphere and hoped his role with GWS would allow for more visits in the future.
"It's been really good, the kids have all enjoyed themselves and that's what it's all about," he said.
"This gives a lot of kids who don't normally play football the opportunity to get out and have a game.
"The skill level has been pretty good. You can really see the kids who play the game regularly and they stand out. But all the kids who don't normally play have also been getting into it and have been really competitive."
The Paul Kelly Cup, which featured Year 5 and 6 students, was won by Morgan Street after they overpowered their North opponents in the final.
Meanwhile the junior Spring Cup competition was won by Sacred Heart Heart after they held off a brave Burke Ward side.
Best players for the day were Fulu Komolafe (Spring Cup) and Tom Ragenovich (Paul Kelly Cup). Both boys received a football signed by Paul Kelly.
Local AFL NSW/ACT Development Officer Dale Tonkin said the day had been a huge success, and thanked Mr Kelly and all the players for creating a great day of football.
"It all went very well. The kids showed a great attitude towards the game, conducted themselves well and showed great sportsmanship. Throw in the kids' natural talent and it all works out to be a great day.
"It was great for Paul Kelly to come out here as well, it's a big commitment from him and it would have been a real buzz for all the kids to have him out there and umpiring the games."

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Fireman challenge you to show your hand

Originally published: Monday, 5th July, 2010

The Broken Hill Mountain Bike Club will hold its 11th annual Poker Race next weekend in Silverton.

The track will follow the Heritage Trail, which is a 7km long circuit.
Riders need to have a mountain bike in good condition, and off-road riding experience.
There are several different categories including Social Class, Junior Girls, Junior Boys B (U15), Junior Boys A (U17), Women, Veteran Men (50+), Men's B, Men's A, and Teams (up to five riders).
"This is a fun event, and with the introduction of the Teams category, we hope to encourage anyone who can get together five riders, who could do one lap each," said the club's spokeswoman Shelley Clarke.
The Fire Brigade has entered a team, and have challenged other workplaces to do the same.
Social riders are also welcome, and will do a shorter, modified circuit along with the juniors.
Each lap completed sees a playing card allocated, and the rider that has the best poker hand at the end of the race will win an original Howard Steer painting, which has been customised for the event.
Prizes are also allocated for each category, and some fun giveaways for the best or worst dressed rider will be awarded.
The Silverton Rural Fire Service will be holding a sausage sizzle to raise funds and any profits from the event will go to local charities and organizations.
Registration will be from 8.30 to 9.30am outside Silverton Souvenirs on the day of the race, Saturday, July 10. The race starts at 10am.
More information can be gained from visiting the club's website www.bhmtb.asn.au or calling the secretary Tas Johnston on 8088 8945.


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Plucky Robins test the Roos

Originally published: Monday, 5th July, 2010

South recorded a 90-point win over West on Saturday, but don't be misled by the scoreboard.

Midway through the third term the Robins had a one-point lead and they went to the last change trailing by only 15 points.
But the last term belonged to the Roos who were simply fantastic, kicking 12 goals to one. From halfway through the third term South kicked 17 goals to three in a dominant display.
The game began in fine conditions with the new scoreboard on and looking spectacular with the Robins kicking to the Country Energy end. And it was the Robins who started the better with their first goal off the boot of Thomas Kickett. Their second came when Chad Ryan kicked truly to give his side a 12-point lead.
The Roos had to wait until the 16 minute mark when Alan Mackiewicz goaled before the Roos kicked three unanswered points to reduce the margin to three points going into the first break.
While spectators had adjusted to the new scoreboard the goal umpires took a little longer as they gave the all clear at quarter time to an empty scoreboard. But they did get it right at half time.
West 2.0 (12) South 1.3 (9).
West extended the lead nine points when Martin goaled after two minutes. The Roos turned up the heat in the middle stages without any real reward. Four behinds was all they could add before the Robins went forward and Ryan kicked his second and the lead was 11 points.
The Roos are a good side and in the dangerous time-on period they added goals through Mackiewicz and Purcell to take a one point lead into the long break.
For the Robins it was a case of not making the most of their opportunities. They had a fair bit of the footy but fell down across half forward. The Roos made the most of their chances even though they kicked poorly.
South 3.7 (25) West 4.0 (24).
The third term started with both sides again throwing their bodies into the fray.
South extended their lead when Manoel goaled but the contest was still a tight affair with neither side giving anything away.
The Robins broke the shackles when Christos goaled to level the scores and this was followed minutes later when Hocking kicked his first to give the Robins a six point lead.
With both sides warming to the task Caldwell kicked his first to again level up the contest. A behind to the Robins then gave them the lead before Westley put the Roos a 5 five points up.
After taking a good contested mark Hocking kicked his second and the Robins again had a one point lead.
What happened next was truly unexpected. The Roos took total control and they kicked four unanswered goals to race to a 22 point lead.
To the Robins' credit they fought the quarter out and Christos kicked a late goal to reduce the margin to 15 points at the last change.
South 10.7 (67) West 8.4 (52)
If you were still coming to grips with the third term, hold on; the ride had just begun.
The Roos took control from the first bounce and with goals to Simon O'Brien, Duguid and Staker the lead was 33 points and the contest was over.
South went on a free for all, kicking another nine goals. The Robins did manage a consolation goal late in the quarter, but in the end the Roos showed plenty of class to run out 90 point winners.
South 22.10 (142) West 9.4 (58)
Best Players:
SOUTH - M.O'Brien, S. O'Brien, M. Westley, T. Derham, J.Staker, M.Manoel.
WEST - C. Ryan, D. Potter, T.Kickett, T. Ferguson, B.McInerney, B. Martin
Goalkickers:
SOUTH - S. O'Brien 4, A.Mackiewicz 3, M.Manoel 3, J.Staker 3, T. Boland 2,                  R. Duguid 2, M.Purcell, M. Westley, D. Stephens, C. Schorn, H. Caldwell 1.
WEST - C. Ryan 2, N.Christos 2, S.Hocking 2, T. Kickett, B. McInerney,               B.Martin 1.
Reserves:
SOUTH 17.11 (113)
WEST 1.2 (8)

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25 years of service celebrated

Originally published: Friday, 2nd July, 2010

One of Happy Day Kindergarten's most dedicated workers celebrated 25 years of service yesterday.

Judy Farquharson started work at the kindy on July 1 1985 after leaving her previous job at Barrier Motors.
"Before my children were born, I worked in clerical positions - Barrier Motors, Argent Motors and receptionist at the Palace Hotel," Mrs Farquharson said.
She said that she became involved with Happy Day in 1976 when her two boys attended Playtime Pre-School.
"I served on their committee as secretary for 10 years. I am very proud to have been made a life member of their association."
She says that the centre's original purpose hasn't changed, but some other aspects have.
"Some of the children today seem to be more confident and outgoing. This may be due to their access and use of modern technology.
"The physical environment of the centre has changed considerably. We have extended our playground, lots of great shade sails and a toddlers' playground, two new classrooms and lots of fresh paint everywhere."
Ms Farquharson said that she had many happy memories from the past 25 years.
"The famous Happy Day Pre School fetes - lots of work, but also lots of fun."
"When one of our new rooms weres being built my classroom was in a shed - that was an experience."
Mrs Farquharson said the children have always called her "Mrs Farquharson", although her favourite variation is "Mrs Sparklison".
"The children often relate special moments to us. We have always said we could write a book, but we haven't yet."
Mrs Farquharson said that many things have kept her working with children for so long, such as lifelong friendships with the staff.
"It is also very rewarding when you see the children blossom, from the first day they walk in the door very shy and sometimes teary, to the day they are ready for 'big school' full of confidence and ready to face the big world.
Mrs Farquharson said she plans to "keep up the good work" until she retires.

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GWAHS move threatens University

Originally published: Friday, 2nd July, 2010

The future of the Broken Hill University Department of Rural Health (UDRH) is under a cloud with one of its partners establishing its own student placement program.

 The head of the UDRH, Professor David Lyle, yesterday said that the Greater Western Area Health Service (GWAHS) had indicated it was taking "greater control of student placement".
 The UDRH now works with the GWAHS and other health care providers to deliver education, support and accommodation for medical, nursing and allied health students under its rural attachment program.
 Prof Lyle said that the UDRH stood to lose about 100 students - or one third of the total student placement - a year if the health service went ahead with plans to established its own placement program for nursing students.
 He said the health service first flagged its intention to centralise control of student placement through its Centre for Rural and Remote Education in November last year.
 "We've been trying to get clarity to see what's happening since that time," prof Lyle told the BDT.
 A meeting with GWAHS chief executive officer Danny O'Connor in May this year, which Prof Lyle attended, failed to shed any more light on the plan.
 "His comments were 'things are going to change and (the health service) is taking greater control of student placement.'"
 In October last year Mr O'Connor announced plans to establish the Greater Western Centre for Rural and Remote Education as part of its partnership with Sydney South West Area Health Service.
 The centre would pool education resources within Greater Western into "a single service" to provide education and training to staff across the entire area.
 But Prof Lyle fails to see the logic in the health service running a similar program "in parallel with our program rather than in collaboration with us".
 He said the UDRH had enjoyed strong support from the health service in the past and "we're really questioning why this change".
 "We're at the cutting edge of how to run clinical placement in settings like Broken Hill.
 "At the end of the day it's important to strengthen institutions like this in Broken Hill.
 "We should be strengthening it because strong institutions are important to the (city's) future vitality."
 "Our plea is work with us, not against us."
 Local MP John Williams said the health service's plan was a "cash grab" that would result in "the dismantling" of a service that has been operating for more than 10 years.
 "I might suggest that GWAHS's desire to remove UDRH is driven by the fact that the State Government is focused on getting its hands on new Federal Government money for clinical training of health students, rather than building on what works," he said.
 A spokesman for the area health service yesterday confirmed it had recently submitted an application to the Commonwealth Government for clinical placement funding.
 He said the aim was to increase the amount of clinical experience the health service could offer undergraduate students in its facilities.
 GWAHS also confirmed the establishment of a new Clinical Placement Unit as part of its Centre for Rural and Remote Education (CRRE).
 The spokesman said that the role of the new unit would be to "manage all Greater Western nursing student placements with tertiary education institutions".
 "The methods and models in delivering professional education and training are continuing to change and the area health service seeks to ensure future education and training service needs for both its staff and the organisation are met," he said.
 He said the CRRE would give the area health service "the capacity to capitalise on the skills and resources" to manage its educational services.
 "The Area Health Service will continue to discuss with the UDRH the most appropriate and cost-effective way of delivering ongoing education in remote NSW."
 But Mr Williams said that the University Department was the ideal agency to "formulate a future strategy" for the provision of health services in remote and rural areas.
 "The acknowledgement of the service provided by BHUDRH has been held in high regard by the Governor of NSW and most recently, the Federal Government," he said.


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Jube goes digital

Originally published: Friday, 2nd July, 2010

The new digital scoreboard was being erected at the Jubilee Oval yesterday and will be tested today if everything goes to plan.  

The scoreboard has been three years in the planning and with the support of the Broken Hill Community Credit Union, CFMEU and Country Energy it is now close to being a reality.
The cost of this new addition to the Jube is in excess of $100,000.
Tradesmen from Country Energy have been on site working with a technician from LED Signs to complete the installation.
The framework was completed locally and erected by BOBOS Engineering.
The BH Football League said that without the financial and in-kind support of the Credit Union, CFMEU and Country Energy the project would have never got off the ground.
All sporting bodies that use Jubilee Oval including junior and senior football, cricket, softball and Rugby League will be able to use the scoreboard.

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Shinglebacks win charity soccer cup

Originally published: Friday, 2nd July, 2010

Spectators and players braved temperatures below four degrees to play in the WHK-BDT Charity Cup Soccer Competition on Tuesday night at the Norm Fox soccer ovals.

Sixteen workplaces fielded a team in the event with each playing two matches in order to win a spot in the grand final.
When the dust (or frost) had settled, WHK Accountants found themselves up against the formidable Shinglebacks in the final. The Shinglebacks prevailed.
"The Shinglebacks AFL Masters entered the Charity Cup to ensure the organisers had enough teams to have two pools of eight," said team member Peter Nash.
"In our wildest dreams we did not expect to taste success, given we had four players over 50, and a whilst some of our members play B Grade soccer (or once did) we were expecting to just make up the numbers.
"The night was a great success."
Organiser of the competition, Lachlan McInnes, said that he had received a very good response from everyone on the night.
"We've got lots of positive feedback. Everyone who came down enjoyed it," Mr McInnes said.
"From the feedback, we're seriously considering doing it again."
He said that $1,176.40 was raised on the night for local charities.
As the winners, the Shinglebacks chose the local Prostate Cancer Support Group as their charity and will give them $776.40.
Runners-up WHK will donate $400 to Lifeline BH.
The Palace Queenies (from the Palace Hotel) came third, Morgan Milan FC (Morgan St School) was fourth, The Referees (soccer refs) came fifth and BDTeam (Barrier Daily Truth) came sixth out of the 16 teams that played.


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Craft market back on again

Originally published: Thursday, 1st July, 2010

The YWCA will hold its annual Craft Market on Saturday.

It will take place between 10am and 4pm at the YWCA at 349 Blende Street (next door to Everybody's supermarket).
Arts and crafts, children's smocked clothes, lead lighting, home-made chocolates, and more will be on sale.
The 'Y' Cafe is also located down behind all the craft stalls, and will be selling home-made pasties, sausage rolls, toasted sandwiches, little cakes, tea and coffee.


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More respite available

Originally published: Thursday, 1st July, 2010

A new respite service is helping to provide support for people with all types of disabilities at any age with the opening of a new respite house.

Sunraysia Residential Services (SRS) is a non-for-profit community organization, providing an environment where, it says, all people are treated with dignity, respect and fairness.
After providing services in and around the Sunraysia area, SRS has created a sub-branch in Broken Hill, which is locally run.
SRS has opened its respite house at 2 Quarry Street.
Denise Baker, the co-ordinator of the local branch, said many locals were unaware that SRS existed here.
"We've been up and running for eight weeks," she said.
Elizabeth Cross, an administration assistant, is encouraging any interested volunteers to come forward and donate their time and, if possible, any old or unused furniture.
"We want the place to feel more homely," she said.
Sunraysia Residential Services offer services and accommodation including respite (emergency and planned), supported accommodation, independent living, training, educational programs, recreation and social opportunities to connect within the community.
Services are delivered in a wide range of locations and settings including client homes, SRS Respite and in the community, 24 hours, 7 days a week.
"It's not about taking over but supporting people in living independently," said Ms Cross.
The services provided include housekeeping, meal preparation, keeping the house clean, running errands, making social calls. The respite service also helps with the activities of daily living such as showering, dressing and grooming.
It is also acknowledged that carers need a rest as well, to compensate for this SRS will provide services so carers can take a break when needed.
All the employed staff are carefully selected and screened.
For more information contact 0428 213 884 or visit http://www.srsinc.com.au.

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When the going gets cold, the cold get burrowing

Originally published: Thursday, 1st July, 2010

A tiny bird found in the local district has a special way of dealing with the cold weather - it burrows into the ground.

The pardalote, which fully grown can fit in the palm of your hand, is found in Broken Hill and locals may see them in gardens, along roadsides or in parks and golf courses, excavating their nest out of soft sandy soil to keep warm.
Australia's Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife's Backyard Buddies said it was easy to make your backyard a haven for the pardalotes.
"While most birds nest high above the ground in the branches of trees, these cheeky little locals prefer to go subterranean," said the chief executive officer of the Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife, Leonie Gale.
"Pardalotes spend most of their time feeding in the canopies of tall eucalypts, making them difficult to see," she said.
During breeding season the birds form pairs or small groups; they then carefully select soft strands of grass to line their dug out burrows.
The burrows can reach up to 60cm long and the birds vigorously guard them against other pardalotes.
Ms Gale said while the birds may nest in unwanted places in yards, residents should not disturb them until after the chicks have hatched.
"Pardalotes may take up residence where they aren't wanted such as in partially built retaining walls, piles of building sand or potting mix in the backyard," she said.
"While this can be inconvenient, it's best not to disturb them. Wait until the birds have raised their chicks to fledging stage, at which time the family will move on and you can get on with your renovations."
Ms Gale said the first indication that these delightful, brightly coloured little birds were nearby was their distinct call - a chipping call - which also gave the Striated Pardalote its nickname the "chip-chip bird".
She also said their colour gave them away.
"Once spotted, you can identify Striated Pardalotes by their white eyebrows and yellow spot in front of the eye, olive-grey backs, yellow breast and a white stripe in the wing with a red or yellow notch," Ms Gale said.
Pardalotes can be encouraged to breed in the garden by hanging short lengths of hollow plastic piping in trees. These make ideal artificial nests as they simulate hollow limbs of trees.
Keeping a watchful eye on pets and preventing the clearance of eucalyptus trees will ensure the preservation of these burrowing birds.

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Outstanding swimmers selected for SA squad

Originally published: Thursday, 1st July, 2010

Two members of the Broken Hill Swimming Club, Amber Grose (13) and Ethan Thomas (14), have been selected in Swimming SA development squads.

A spokeswoman for the club said that their selection was due to their outstanding achievements over the past year.
"To have two swimmers from a country club selected in SA development squads is just fantastic, it is a fine reward for their hard work and commitment," she said.
Swimmers from the club recently received their Australian Junior Excellence Program (JX) packages from Swimming Australia.
The program recognises and rewards junior swimmers who, through their development of aquatic skills and fitness, achieve a high standard of swimming excellence.
Under the program, swimmers aged from 9 to 13 years, who accomplish times set by Swimming Australia, qualify at Gold, Silver, Bronze or Green standard, depending on their best performances during the season.
Qualifiers receive a distinctive JX Cap for 9 and 10 year olds and a JX T-Shirt for 11-13 year olds, along with certificate of achievement signed by National Coach Leigh Nugent and members of the Australian Swim Team.
Head Coach of the club Marisa Webb said she was very happy with high number of swimmers attaining these standards under the JX Program.

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