News archive

This is an archive containing every news story ever posted on the BDT website. If you’re looking for a specific article, try the search box at the top right hand side of this page. Otherwise you can just browse the archive by selecting a year and month below.

August, 2010

Hannah scoops another award

Originally published: Tuesday, 31st August, 2010

Local student Hannah Licul has scooped two major youth awards after being named Quota Club Broken Hill's Student of the Year.

The 16-year-old, who has just returned from America on an army cadet exchange program, was one of eight high school students to compete in the annual event, which was held over two nights last week.
Winning has become something of a habit for the Year 11 BH High School student, who earlier this year took out the local Lions Youth of the Year before making it to the State final.
But Hannah said she didn't enter the events to win but rather for the experience, confidence and friendships they provided.
"Even just participating is good on your resume," said Hannah, who received $250, a trophy and certificate.
Now in its 20th year, the competition tests participants on their public speaking ability and general knowledge on local, national and international topics.
Topics this year included solar and wind power, the local film studio and the upcoming Commonwealth Games.
For her prepared speech, Hannah spoke about how women, despite capably filling leadership roles, continue to receive less pay then their male counterparts.
Hannah, who thanked teacher Maureen Clark for her support, said she would recommend events like the Lions and Quota competitions to any student.
Event co-ordinator Claire McLean said the three judges were "blown away" by the standard of all eight students, and the extra-curricular activities they were involved in.
"Students today seem to be interested in so many things," Ms McLean said.
While numbers have waned in recent years, Ms Mclean said the number of entrants was up on last year, and included several Year 10 students.
"It's good experience for Year 10s because they can enter next year."
Four other BH High School students - Hannah Brimstone, Elliot Mallon, Kristin Riley and Roderick Jones - entered the event along with Hayden Zammit, Cassandra McEvoy and Shae Grundy from Willyama.

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Cars, bikes, stunts

Originally published: Tuesday, 31st August, 2010

As details surrounding the big-budget flick Fury Road continue to be a closely guarded secret, including the vehicles being used, snippets of information about the film are leaking out.

While photographs have appeared online of some of the vehicles apparently being used in the movie, a stunt rider has revealed that more than 100 cars and bikes will appear in the film which is being shot on the Mundi Mundi Plains.
Cameron Taylor, a multiple Australian Motocross champion, is apparently in the city rehearsing stunts for the fourth Mad Max movie and has been quoted recently by Transmoto Magazine.
"It's a big budget deal that got 130 cars and bikes and 298 stunts," Taylor told the magazine.
He goes on to say that some of the bikes have been modified, including super-long swingarms and beefed-up suspension, while others have "insane paint jobs".
"I'm literally riding all day at the moment, but I think they're holding off on desserts for us as they want us to all have that skinny, feral desert look."
Taylor said all the stunt riders were going to be part of the film, not used as doubles, and they would be back early next year for seven months of filming.
Meanwhile, photos of four heavily modified vehicles purported to be for the film have appeared on adventure rider.com. The vehicles were on the back of a semi-trailer and covered.
At least some of the vehicles for the movie, which will star Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron, are being stored and modified at the former Galena Street power station, which has been a hive of activity for several weeks now.
Over 100 people involved in pre-production are now thought to be in the city, with most expected to leave at the end of September before returning again in mid-November.
Shooting of the post-apocalyptic film, which had been expected to start in the second half of this year but has continued to be pushed back, is scheduled to begin in February.
About 450 people will be involved during shooting which will continue through to July, with a four week break in March.
Insiders have said the epic movie will boost the local economy not only now but also into the future, in the same way The Lord of the Rings trilogy helped New Zealand.
The film will also feature Nicholas Hoult and Riley Keough, the granddaughter of the late singer Elvis Presley.

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Stakes are high for disadvantaged kids

Originally published: Tuesday, 31st August, 2010

The Harley Riders Association annual Poker Run will be held on the weekend.

The ride is open to more than just Harleys. Dirt bikes, road bikes and riders of any kind of motorcycle are welcome to take part. Proceeds will be donated to Stewart House in Sydney. The house provides 12-day stays for disadvantaged students from all over NSW, including Broken Hill. While there, students attend classes and receive a range of medical services.
Nominations for the poker run are open on Saturday from 11am until noon at the Hog Lodge in Crystal Lane.
A $10 fee covers participation and a sausage sizzle afterwards.
Riders will visit four locations and receive a playing card at each one. The rider with the best hand at the end wins a prize.
There's a lot of other prizes on offer as well, for things such as the worst hand and the youngest and oldest rider.
After the ride participants are invited to return to the clubrooms for a celebration, including food and prize presentations.


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Disability services on show

Originally published: Tuesday, 31st August, 2010

Twelve services presented at a free seminar yesterday to demonstrate the range of options available to local students with a disability.

The seminar, called "Career Toolbox for People with a Disability", was held at the BH Community Centre.
It aimed to deliver information and advice to students and their parents, as well as education staff and service providers, about the types of services and programs available when they finish school.
Cynthia Fitzpatrick from the National Disability Co-ordination Officer Program, a chief organiser of the event, said it was targeted at students who were in support classes at school, and helping them move into further education.
She said the event had been a great example of students being supported, as well as a good networking opportunity for services who were working to the same ends.


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Perilya profit slide

Originally published: Monday, 30th August, 2010


Falling metal prices have contributed to a 35 per cent drop in Perilya's half yearly results.

The majority-owned Chinese silver, lead and zinc miner's interim report from December 30 to June 30 showed a slide in the zinc and lead prices, in Australian dollars, of 29 and 26 per cent respectively.
The company said on Friday that it considered the $18.5 million profit results good.
It said they contrasted with a challenging six months with zinc prices slumping from highs at the end of 2009 of almost $2900 per tonne to lows of around $1950/T, while lead dropped from highs of almost $2700/T to a low of just over $1900/T in early June.
"Despite a relatively strong start to the period in terms of metal prices and market optimism, it has ultimately been a difficult period for base metals producers, with significant falls in both zinc and lead prices," managing director Paul Arndt said.
"Given this environment, Perilya has produced an outstanding (result) in posting an after tax profit of $18.5 million for the six month period."
Perilya said the result was further demonstration of the strength of the Broken Hill operations and a further endorsement of the decisions taken in late to 2008 to restructure the operations to focus on a lower production and cost profile.
"The strong performance in a time of relatively weak metal prices underpins our confidence in our Broken Hill operations and allows us to turn our focus to growth opportunities for the company," Mr Arndt said.
"We have seen over a sustained period of 18 months the benefits of increased productivity and a repositioning of our cost base is significantly lower down on the industry cost curve as (a) result of our restructure in late 2008."
At Broken Hill the results showed that for the reporting period the company mined more ore than the previous six months but that ore grades were lower with zinc at 4.6 per cent, lead at 3.8 per cent and silver at 38.5 grams per tonne.
Production was 33,1000 tonnes of contained zinc and 26,900 tonnes of contained lead.


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Jazz club to set the scene

Originally published: Monday, 30th August, 2010

Broken Hill High School is out to amaze and entertain locals with their Extravganza night next week.

Dance students will show off their talents when they perform acts from shows such as Chicago and perform tributes to singers such as Tina Turner on September 9.
Dance co-ordinator Charyne Bradley said the night would be a "big job."
"(We'll be) turning the hall into a big jazz club," Ms Bradley said.
She said the school holds a dance concert every year, but wanted to do something "classier" this time.
About 70 students will take part in both on stage and back stage.
Hospitality students will also be taking part by helping serve h'orderves for the 150 guests expected to attend.
Tickets are $17 and are on sale from reception at Broken Hill High, and Ms Bradley said there were 15 tables of 10 available.
Doors open at 7pm for a 7:30pm start.

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Visitors numbers up

Originally published: Monday, 30th August, 2010

Almost 230,000 tourists passed through the city's Visitors' Information Centre over the past financial year, a big increase on the previous year.

City Council considered its fourth quarter performance at its monthly meeting on Wednesday. Councillor John Groenendijk singled out tourism figures as particularly worthy of mention, and Councillor Christine Adams commended the City Library.
In 2009/2010 Council had a target of having 130,000 tourists pass through the centre. That proved much too conservative, with the end tally at 228,813. The previous year's total was 203,898. that's an increase of 12.2 per cent.
Clr Groenendijk commended the staff at the Visitors' information Centre.
He said such a fabulous result emphasised the importance of tourism to the city's financial future.
Clr Adams said the City Library was providing an excellent service and the staff there were to be commended.


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Local talent wins through to Los Angeles stage show

Originally published: Friday, 27th August, 2010

Two local girls have earned the chance of a lifetime to perform on the international stage.

Last week Catherine Bransdon and Shannon Swart, both 14, auditioned for a Glee Club Australia tour to Los Angeles in December.
The Glee Club Australia Tour is being launched by the Australian Institute for Performing Arts (AIPA).
Through the tour, AIPA is offering singers and dancers the chance to study with some of Los Angeles' best choreographers, composers, musical directors and vocal coaches and perform in a show for the US market.
This project is a world first with the casting director of Step Up 1, 2 and 3, Richard Mento, flying in for the auditions which were held in Sydney, Perth and Dubbo.
Catherine and Shannon learned this week that they had been accepted for the tour.
Catherine's mother Anne Bransdon said it was a nervous wait for the girls to see if they had got in.
Mrs Bransdon said both girls had a lot of talent.
"Shannon's strength is in singing and Catherine's in dance, but both can carry off a "Triple Threat" which is acting, singing and dancing."
The girls will get to perform at Universal Studios and Disneyland and work with the likes of the musical director, choreographer and casting director of the hit TV show "Glee".
Catherine and Shannon had to sing a song of their choice, take part in an interview and attend an open dance call for the audition.
Catherine sang Under the Milky Way, by The Church, and Shannon sang Perfect Isn't Easy, by Bette Midler, and Before He Cheats, by Carrie Underwood.
Charles Bartley, a contestant from So You Think You Can Dance, was selected to choreograph the audition dance calls in Sydney, Perth and Dubbo and worked alongside Richard Mento.
Mrs Bransdon saw this audition as a great chance to show the talent in Broken Hill.
"This was a fantastic opportunity to show the world what type of talent we have in Broken Hill," she said.
She said the girls are active performers and this played a "huge part" in being their accepted.
"Both girls are established artists in their own right and this is thanks to some great mentors such as Sanny Dougherty, Joy Baldwin, Kristil Cowdrey, Marilyn Harris, Tracey Hicks and Rachel Devoy.
"Opportunities to perform at events such as the Broken Hill Eisteddfod, Broken Hill Choral Festivals, NSW School Spectacular and their individual school events has given the girls the confidence to perform in front of the world's best such as Richard Mento."
As part of this program the girls will attend a boot camp in the September school holidays.
They will fly out to Los Angeles on December 2.

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Mayor donates wheels for meals

Originally published: Friday, 27th August, 2010

More volunteers are needed in our city, according to Mayor Wincen Cuy.

Mayor Cuy helped celebrate National Meals on Wheels day on Wednesday by giving up an hour and a half of his time to deliver meals to sick and elderly people.
"I'm here on work experience ... to see what volunteers do and what they provide," he said
Every year the hard work of Meals on Wheels is celebrated on a national day at the end of August.
Locally, volunteers deliver fresh, home-cooked meals every day to 57 sick or elderly people. About 15 volunteers prepare and cook a three-course lunch from scratch.
The winter menu includes soup, a main meal and a dessert for as little as $6 per day. The volunteers donate about two hours of their time a day to make and deliver the meals.
Meals on Wheels, like many other volunteer organisations, is always looking for more helpers.
Mr Cuy said everyone who could should consider giving up some of their time to help their fellow citizens.
"I would encourage people who have spare time to call Meals on Wheels to help with this valuable community service," the mayor said

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Council plans for film studio to pay for itself

Originally published: Friday, 27th August, 2010

The city's new film studio could eventually become a self-sufficient enterprise, rather than a cost for City Council.

At Wednesday night's monthly meeting of City Council, the elected body endorsed a number of recommendations from the Film Broken Hill Advisory Group.
That group, which has met twice, has been considering a business plan for the studio and a potential film precinct.
The plan has been put together by consultants who took input from 90-odd locals and external experts.
An extended precinct could include other facilities and tourist attractions at the studio site.
The plan is for the studio and precinct to remain in public hands but be managed by an independent, not-for-profit Trust or Foundation.
The aim is to better attract investment and react quickly to business opportunities.
Council's General Manager Frank Zaknich said that by identifying commercial opportunities, the project could become self-sustaining or offset some of Council's other expenses. It will be two years before the studio transitions into that form, and any change of management will require Council and NSW Government approval.
If it works, Council could look at it as a model for other business-like expenses, such as the Entertainment Centre and Visitors Information Centre.
Council spends a lot of money running those facilities, and if they could instead be cost-neutral, the money could go towards their core business of maintaining Broken Hill.
Other measures endorsed by Council on Wednesday include: completing a tourist survey to see how many visitors the precinct could attract; develop a brand; promote business excellence in support industries in the city; apply for more funding, and; work to capitalise on the Fury Road production to build initial awareness.
Councillor Tom Kennedy sought to have the endorsement of the plan delayed on Wednesday night, citing concerns over a lack of detail.
He wanted a committee formed to look at the options more closely. But he was not supported by the other councillors and the measures were endorsed.

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Back-to-back flags for Roos

Originally published: Friday, 27th August, 2010

Congratulations to the South Football Club for taking out the Under 18 Premiership with a hard fought 22-point victory over a gallant West on Wednesday night.

The match was played in front of a crowd of more than 1200.
The game started with West having first use of a 3-goal wind blowing to the town end of the Jubilee Oval.
It took the Robins seven minutes to open their scoring with a goal to Danny Gray after a long bomb from Brett Martin into the goal square.
The first time forward for South resulted in a minor score. The Robins looked to have plenty of run in their legs and when Nathan Kickett weaved his magic to set up Gray for his and West's second goal the Robins had the perfect start.
South were starting to get their hands on the ball as Heath Caldwell and Cody Schorn both missed chances in front of goal.
From the resulting kick in West ran the ball the length of the ground to find Gray again for his third goal and when Heath Harris set up Jono Naden from the bounce West had four goals and were on top.
Heath Teelow was on top in the ruck and Nathan Kickett and Nick Agius were dominating the mid-field.
On the quarter time siren Kickett took a great mark, with the ball sailing through for West's fifth goal of the term.
The Robins had a 26-point lead and with the West faithful swarming around the quarter time huddle everything was looking red and black.
The margin could have easily been bigger if not for the defensive efforts of Tom Derham and the hard running of Marc Purcell.
Quarter time west 5.0 (30) to South 0.4 (4).
The second term saw South with the wind and, surprisingly, West made no structural changes. Many expected the Robins to send a few loose in the backline to limit South's goal scoring options.
South on the other hand threw Heath Caldwell into the centre of the action and gave Riley Elliott a licence to roam free.
Caldwell finally got South's first goal after five minutes of play and when he set up Elliott shortly after the margin was 14 points.
All the South big guns in Caldwell, Purcell, Derham and Elliott were getting plenty of the ball and when an unusually quiet Cody Schorn laid a good tackle and goaled it was just 7 points the difference.
Ayden Pettitt and Jordan Holmes were getting on top of West in the ruck and Todd Davidson was where he loves it, at the bottom of the packs.
The rain started to fall and made the conditions even tougher for the players and when Holmes goaled after a 50 metre penalty the scores were level.
The halftime siren couldn't come quickly enough for the Robins as they had lost their way and South were well and truly on top.
Zac Gentle, Nathan Kickett and Nick Agius battled hard that term for West and Derham continued to repel West whenever they went forward.
Heath Caldwell really set the tone for South that term and it was all locked up at the long break with West having the wind in the third term.
Half time: West 5.0 (30), South 4.6 (30).
All nine goals so far had been kicked to the city end and West were heading that way with a chance to restore a lead.
The third term is always referred to as the premiership quarter and good sides with high aspiration stand up.
That is just what South did.
Matt Day gave South the perfect start with a goal and when Derham set up Caldwell south had a 13-point lead.
The southerners were right on top at this stage and looking the goods.
Every time West did manage to go forward Derham was in the way as he took mark after mark in a dominating display at centre-half back.
Tyson Boland then turned the screws on West even more when he kicked two goals in as minutes and the Kangaroos were out by 25 points.
West started to get their hands on the ball in the dying few minutes but unfortunately they could only manage two points and not goals.
Tom Derham starred for South and was well supported by Purcell, Caldwell and Elliott.
For West none tried harder than Nathan Kickett and Nick Agius.
Three quarter time: South 8.7 (55) to West 5.2 (32).
The final term saw South with one hand on the trophy and Caldwell and Derham continued where they left off.
It was becoming mission impossible for the Robins.
Matt Day bobbed up with his second goal and South were home, leading by 30 points.
Nathan Kickett capped off his good game for West with his second goal and West's first since the quarter time siren to reduce the margin to a respectable level, but it was all South after the first break. They kicked 9 goals to 1 after quarter time.
Unfortunately an ugly melee broke out with just minutes remaining on the clock which stained a good game.
Tom Derham won the medal for best player for South and Nathan Kickett won the same for West. Both played their respective hearts out for their clubs.
Ayden Pettitt and Jordan Holmes dominated the ruck after quarter time, Jesse Whitfield worked his way into the game, Heath Caldwell, Marc Purcell and Riley Elliott were not too far behind Derham as South's best.
For West Nick Agius, Zac Gentle, Jono Naden and Liam King battled hard and with three first term goals Danny Gray gave his all.
Congratulations to South for making it back-to-back flags.
Well done West, North and Central for the most even and exciting season in memory.
A big thanks to all involved with Under 18 football, the umpires, gate workers, time keepers, canteen helpers and the Broken Hill Football League on an outstanding competition and giving up their time every Wednesday night.
Also thank you to the BDT for their coverage of this grade and 2BH for broadcasting the game live.
Final scores: South 9.9 (63) d West 6.5 (41).
Best players - South: T Derham, H Caldwell, M Purcell, R Elliott, J Holmes, A Pettitt, J Whitfield, T Davidson; West: N Kickett, N Agius, Z Gentle, J Naden, D Grey, L King.
Goal scorers - South: H Caldwell 2, T Boland 2, M Day 2, R Elliott 1, C Schorn 1, J Holmes 1; West: D Grey 3, N Kickett 2, J Naden 1.

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Townhouse plan a first for city

Originally published: Thursday, 26th August, 2010


An ambitious plan to build 38 new townhouses on Murton Street would be a welcome addition to the market, according to a local real estate agent.

Queensland developer PC Items wants to build the two story, three and four bedroom, eco-friendly townhouses to plug a hole in the up-market housing rental market.
LJ Hooker's Jim Hickey said while the plan was ambitious it was much needed to combat an increasing rental demand.
"I'm very excited," Mr Hickey said.
"We have a shortage of quality houses in Broken Hill that have the inclusions this development offers.
"(Demand) is always strong for good rentals. It's been like that for a long time. You can never get enough good stuff."
Mr Hickey has been liaising with PC Items for about eight months on the plan, which would see the block between Buck and Murton streets and Wolfram Street and Wolfram Lane redeveloped.
The site was the former Saints Peter and Paul infants school grounds in Murton Street.
The former school building, which is now privately owned, will not be knocked down but will be incorporated into the new development named Murton Springs.
Built to six star energy specifications, the townhouses will have outdoor areas, fully landscaped low maintenance gardens and access to a heated communal pool.
PC Items has yet to lodge a development application to City Council but director Geoff Millward said that would happen this week.
Mr Millward said he wanted to begin actual construction in February.
"We're looking to kick off ... physical construction at the beginning of February," Mr Millward said.
"There's work to do on the sewage (and other things) that can happen in between time."
The townhouses are expected to sell for $300,000 to $350,000 for a three bedroom, while the four bedroom would be in excess of $350,000, Mr Hickey said.
He said the rental return would be around $400 per week.
Despite the high prices Mr Hickey said he was confident the concept would work.
"(Sales of high priced houses) have been slow. It's been very slow," he said.
"We have studied the planned development and believe in its current form it will be well received by the community.
"I think it's a great new development. It's something we've never seen.
"Rental prices are going up everywhere and we haven't caught up with that yet."
PC Items was one of a group of developers who came to Broken Hill on a City Council hosted regional tour back in 2008.
While a predicted increase in the city's population was set back by the Global Financial Crisis, Mr Hickey said the company has completed a further strategic plan and feels confident there will be a resurgence in the predicted growth.
"Providing their research proves to be correct then it will be a real winner," he said.
"I think it's very positive. I think it's a start in the right direction."

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Young and old enjoy tea party with a twist

Originally published: Thursday, 26th August, 2010

A Mad Hatter's Tea Party was held at Aruma Lodge yesterday with the residents playing housie, dressing up and winning prizes.

"Seniors are left out in society and I wanted to include them," said Desley Edwards who organised the event with the help of Dave Gallagher.
Desley, a year 11 Willyama High School student, is part of the Max Potential youth leadership program.
She said it was fun event where the elderly had a chance to tell stories and talk to young people.
Mr Gallagher, a Max Potential coach, said the day was fantastic for both young the old. He said Max Potential was great for getting kids thinking.
"There's good interaction between the residents and the youths," he said.
"(They are) looking outside of the square now and thinking differently."
Aruma activities manager Toni Channing said the residents enjoyed the interaction.
"I think it's wonderful to bring the old and the young together," she said.
Desley will return to Aruma Lodge tommorow to help residents celebrate Daffodil Day.

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New chairman for Legacy as good work continues

Originally published: Thursday, 26th August, 2010

A new chairman has been appointed to the local Legacy branch as the organisation prepares for its annual badge day tomorrow.

Les Creswick will take over from Des Kennedy, who served one term as chairman.
Mr Kennedy said that the job wasn't easy but in his term in office Legacy had spend more than $165,000 on 59 widows' homes, which included fitting handrails and steps.
"We try to keep them in their own home," he said.
Legacy manages three units in Tramway Terrace and six in the Shorty O'Neil Village, and serves more than 250 widows in the city.
Mr Creswick said his challenge was to meet the needs of an increasingly older population.
"We need to meet all the challenges they present to us," he said.
Mr Creswick said he would like to organise a system whereby the widows were being checked on daily.
Tomorrow is Legacy Badge Day and collectors will be in the city asking for donations.
Mr Creswick said they would be in Argent Street, at the Plaza and various businesses.
"It's not a government-funded organisation. All money raised is by donation," Mr Kennedy said.
He said the badge day was particularly important as the money goes towards helping local widows.

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Memorial Oval needs quick fix

Originally published: Thursday, 26th August, 2010

City Council will "pull out all the stops" to have the lights at the Memorial Oval repaired before the Silver City Show begins.

At last night's monthly meeting of Council, Deputy Mayor Neville Gasmier aired his concerns over the state of the oval and asked whether it was unsafe, given recent public scrutiny.
The Broken Hill Football League has been holding matches at the Jubilee Oval as they say both the scoreboard and time-keeper's box are unusable.
The league says the facility is overdue for maintenance, the scoreboard is dangerous, and that they're paying to hire the facility, so it should be maintained.
Mayor Wincen Cuy said the scoreboard had been vandalised between games, prompting the League to move matches. He said that was an "over-reaction to a minor problem".
Councillor Marion Browne asked is the elected body should inspect the oval, given that the Silver City Show will be held there next month.
Council's General Manager Frank Zaknich said management was looking into who could fix the globes on the light towers, as it required some expertise. Manager of Infrastructure Paul DeLisio said the question was whether the towers could be climbed safely without a safety line being installed at a cost of almost $40,000.
Councillor Tom Kennedy and Mayor Cuy agreed that Council should "pull out all the stops" to have the work completed before the show starts.
Council is also undertaking a case study to put together a business plan for the oval, and is looking to upgrade the hot water system there.
The oval's management committee has flagged lights, the wall fence and globes in the towers as needing urgent attention.

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Drama project a real horror show

Originally published: Wednesday, 25th August, 2010

"At The Drive In", a zombie-filled art project that involves local young people and their Sydney counterparts, will be performed next month.

Sydney arts group Shopfront have joined forces with West Darling Arts to hold the event.
Young people are being invited to create music, drama and film pieces that show a world where a virus has started turning people into zombies.
The project aims to help young people dramatise and examine times when they've felt like zombies, aliens or outsiders.
Shopfront's Outreach Officer Sarah Emery has already visited Broken Hill and worked with some young locals through the Cornerstone drama group, Broken Hill Youth College and the Alma and Wilcannia Public Schools.
She's keen to hear from others, and everyone aged between 12 and 25 is invited to get involved.
Artworks created by the youngsters will be assemble and displayed both in Sydney and in Broken Hill. Shopfront will bring about 10 young metropolitan participants for the local shows, which will be held at the Living Desert in September.
The two "At The Drive In" performances will be held at 7.30pm on September 10 and 11. The whole thing will be set up as if it exists within the world being explored, and will include the dance, film and musical pieces that have been created.
For more information, or to get involved, contact Sarah Emery at shopfront.org.au or on (02) 9588 3948.

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Things looking up for the bush: MP

Originally published: Wednesday, 25th August, 2010

The re-elected Member for Farrer said a Coalition-led government would be better for the bush but that even if Labor got in, country people would be better off.

Federal parliament is in limbo with a minority government expected to be formed with the help of a handful of Independents, however vote counting from the election is not expected to finish for days.
A political party must have more than 75 votes, or half the seats in the House of Representatives, to form a majority government, but as at 2pm yesterday afternoon neither party had that. The ALP had secured 72 seats while the Coalition held 70.
Four seats were undecided, the Greens had secured one seat and the three remaining seats were won by independents - all former National Party members.
Member for Farrer Sussan Ley said an independent-backed Coalition would provide better outcomes for Farrer as the Coalition had more than 30 rural or regional members of parliament.
"Labor has no rural MPs but there are 30-plus Coalition MPs in rural and regional (Australia)," she said.
"We've got a strong voice in the Coalition and if we're in government that voice will have a much bigger representation in parliament.
"The clear distinction here is who becomes prime minister ... If Tony Abbott became prime minister there will be more certainty for Farrer."
The independents all hold rural and regional seats. They are self-titled "wild man from wild country", Queenslander, Bob Katter, New England's Rob Oakeshott and the north coast MP for Lyne, Tony Windsor.
They, and The Greens' Adam Bandt, are currently negotiating with both Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Opposition Leader Tony Abbott about forming a minority government.
While she had no idea how the three former National MPs would swing, the Liberal Party's Ms Ley, who won her third federal seat on Saturday, believed their constituents would support a Coalition Government.
"I have no predictions. I don't think we can assume anything," Ms Ley said.
"I can say I believe their constituents would want them to support Tony Abbott over Julia Gillard because the rural agricultural areas overwhelmingly are supporters of the Coalition.
"(They all) had very low Labor votes."
Despite the men having issues with the National Party, she said it was possible for them to work with a Liberal/National coalition.
"I know there are personal issues between themselves and the National Party but I believe they will put that to one side," Ms Ley said.
"I believe that when they say they will put that behind them they will. I think they're approaching this exercise with a deal of integrity."
But she said that did not mean she was saying they would support the Coalition.
"No I'm not because they're voting record doesn't indicate that they've supported them over us," Ms Ley said.
"I actually don't know. I really think it's too early to think anything."
Ms Ley said an independent-backed Labor government would be better for Farrer than a Labor government in its own right.
"If they make a deal for rural Australia it would be better than if they weren't there," she said.
"A Labor government with three rural MPs would be a better position but not as good a position if it was a Tony Abbott lead government."
The four undecided seats are Boothby (sitting Liberal MP leads by 519 votes); Denison (Independent leads Labor by 1100 votes); Hasluck (sitting Labor MP trails by 317); and Dunkley (sitting Liberal MP leads by 497 votes).

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Love, trust and honesty key to a lasting union

Originally published: Wednesday, 25th August, 2010

Celebrations are in order as a local couple clock up 60 years of marriage today.

Harold Ritch and Vera Preston will be treated to a celebratory dinner to mark the special occasion.
The two have known each other most of their lives. Harold, who is six years older, used to look after Vera when her mother went to play cards.
The two began dating in January 1949 and it took almost a year and a half to make it to the altar.
The couple were married by Reverend Hardwick at St Peter's Church in 1950 with more than 200 people attending.
"It was a big wedding," Mrs Ritch said.
Mr Ritch said the reception was held at the Palais.
"The two mums, mine and Vera's, wanted to cater it themselves," he said.
Mrs Ritch said the day was a lot of work, and if she had the choice, she wouldn't have had a big wedding.
"I would just go away, just say 'give us money', because it was a lot of work."
Between 1952 and 1964, Mr and Mrs Ritch had five children and moved around NSW for work.
Mr Ritch was the deputy principal of Alma Public School for three years and at the North school for four years. He also worked at many other NSW schools in between.
The couple moved back to the city from Lismore in 1997, and say they are happy in Broken Hill where two of their children still live.
They now have 11 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren, and Mrs Ritch says she remembers all their birthdays.
The couple provided other married couples with the key to reaching their diamond anniversary: love each other.
"Trust each other, love each other and keep nothing from each other," she said.
He also said having five good kids and his wife by his side played a big part.
"The thing that made our marriage so harmonious is all wrapped up in that girl Vera."
The couple now live in a house built by one of their children, Robert, and have some different plans for the future, as "mad on history" Vera wants to travel to Egypt.
"We're happy here where we are," he said. "If we win Lotto, Vera can go to Egypt."
The couple will also be having an open house on Saturday at their home at 30 Thomas Lane between 2pm and 4pm, with friends and family welcome to attend.


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‘Opportunity for country’

Originally published: Tuesday, 24th August, 2010

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In case of emergency, buy ticket

Originally published: Tuesday, 24th August, 2010

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Locusts on their way

Originally published: Tuesday, 24th August, 2010

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Lakes, health pledge

Originally published: Monday, 23rd August, 2010

Ley encouraged by Broken Hill vote

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Colourful Army Cadet activities

Originally published: Monday, 23rd August, 2010

Team building, communications, navigation, camouflage and drills were just some of the activities that were conducted recently to encourage the city’s young to try something new.

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Nurse training at hand

Originally published: Monday, 23rd August, 2010

A new training facility has been established at the local hospital. The “clinical skills lab” will provide a convenient way for clinical staff to practice skills, such as cannulation, venepuncture and advanced life support.

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Roos too strong for the Robins

Originally published: Monday, 23rd August, 2010

In the second of the double headers at Jubilee Oval on Saturday South defeated West by 93 points. South kicked 20.17 (137) to West 7.2 (44). West had a lot to play for as they had beaten South narrowly last time the two teams met. West was also trying to reward Tim Ferguson with a win. Ferguson was playing his last match for the Robins after a career spanning 20 years; 250 games plus, one Lionel Johnston Medal and three club best and fairest awards.

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Challenging apathy

Originally published: Friday, 20th August, 2010

Independent candidate for Farrer, Louise Burge, yesterday denied that she had entered the election race with the express purpose of knocking the Labor candidate out.

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Steer's Twilight Racing

Originally published: Friday, 20th August, 2010

Howard Steer has added a splash of colour to the upcoming Silver City Cup meeting.
The renowned local artist has created a vibrant outback race scene for the cup’s poster which combines the city’s rich mining heritage and its love of horse racing.
The painting was designed with input from SC Race Club Secretary Marg Andrews and shows four jockeys wearing miner’s lamps against a backdrop of headframes and other mining structures.
Mr Steer said the painting was completed over a period of two weeks, and described the process as an enjoyable one.
“It was fun trying to get all the shadows right, and the twilight scene... it was simple and enjoyable to paint,” he said.
“I look forward to doing it every time they ask, and I’d gladly do it again in future.”
It is the third time Mr Steer has provided a piece of art to promote the cup, and he said he hoped to see the meeting continue to grow.
“Any event like the races is good for the city and the people.
“It’s great entertainment, and it’s held on Cox Plate day, don’t forget - it’s a really good day to have it.
“It helps promote tourism and it brings a lot of money into the city. If we could have six events like this it would be fantastic.”
The painting has now been transferred onto print, and posters are expected to be available next week. “I’m rapt with the end result. I personally think it looks extremely effective,” said Mrs Andrews.
“And I’ve had a lot of comments from the other Committee members and the public - they’ve all been very impressed."

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Foreign exchange

Originally published: Thursday, 19th August, 2010

Willyama and Broken Hill High have recently accepted three new exchange students, whilst one local student will be jetting off to France.

Willyama's Jacka Hicks recently won a 'Go France' scholarship which will send the 16-year-old to France for 12 months.
"It'll be a great experience," Jacka said.
"(I'll miss my) friends, but it'll be worth it."
Hugh Davies and Danielle Roberts from Willyama have since returned from France and the Netherlands, and both speak very highly of the experience.
"I had a good time, I loved my host family," Hugh said.
"(It was so) exciting, I loved it," Danielle said.
When Danielle was in the Netherlands, she learned to speak fluent Dutch.
Broken Hill High has also taken on a young French student, Laura Callens, who says she is enjoying living in Broken Hill.
"The people are very friendly," she said.
Two Willyama High students, Lena Wnzel from Germany, and Andrea Carmen from Spain arrived in the city recently.
"I like it because it's in the outback and it's so different from where I come from," Lena said.
Local hosting team leader Karen Kemp said the program enables local and international students to interact with people from a different culture.
"The international kids get to experience a new culture," Ms Kemp said.
"These girls' English is poor, so they can learn to speak English to further their career opportunities.
"Here these kids are special."
The exchange students will be taken 115km from the city on to Tirlta Station in April next year to witness first-hand how the station works.
Ms Kemp said an 18-year-old German student will be making his way to the city in two weeks and will be involved in Landcare and also help her promote exchange programs in the city.
Any families interested in hosting the student can contact Ms Kemp on 8088 2462.

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"Environmental genocide"

Originally published: Thursday, 19th August, 2010

Destroying the Menindee Lakes system for a water savings of under 200 gigalitres was "environmental genocide", according to DRAG President Mark Hutton.

The Darling River Action Group (DRAG) yesterday received Part B of the Darling River Water Savings Project's final report.
DRAG Secretary Barney Stephens said the project was about water saving in the Darling River Basin, but their findings focussed entirely on Menindee Lakes.
The report outlines six schemes for the Lakes. Only three provide the annual water savings of over 100 gigalitres that make them likely to be considered.
The first scheme calls for lakes Menindee and Cawndilla to be shut down entirely, and water to be allowed to flow past on down the river.
A drainage channel would also be run into Lake Pamamaroo. The report says this would save 248 gigalitres a year, but that it would produce unacceptable environmental effects.
The second plan would see Menindee and Cawndilla filled only once every seven years - or less if there was no flow in the right year.
This scheme would also see the Pamamaroo Channel built, and is supposed to save 125 gigalitres a year.
Mr Stephens said this was basically what has happened since 2002, with little water saved because little had reached Menindee Lakes.
The third scheme takes the measures outlined in the second and adds extensive works to manage water.
Savings were said to be about 135GL a year, but were not adequately modelled.
Mr Stephens said that, when added to the cost of storing Broken Hill's drought reserve water in an aquifer, the works would cost around $100 million. That's the figure Labor has said they will spend on the Lakes if re-elected.
The works include a new regulator and enlarged channels and outlets, and is similar to suggestions DRAG made to the report's authors.
But DRAG did not recommend the less frequent filling of the lakes.
Some options ruled out as being too expensive to warrant the savings included dividing Lake Menindee into segments and building a channel from Cawndilla to the Darling.
Alternatives considered for Broken Hill's water supply were: managed aquifer recharge; storage in Lake Tandure with either an upgraded Weir 32 or nearby off-lake five gigalitre storage, or; a nearby off-lake designated 18 gigalitre storage.
Mr Stephens suspected Country Water would have to pay for the new storages, with costs passed on to local water users.
He also took issue with each project's 'annual water savings' figure, produced by computer modelling.
"In some years there is very little water and in others there are, or once were, floods," he said.
"It would make more sense to talk in terms of savings per small, medium and large flow, and then to estimate the frequency of these."
Mark Hutton said the Government was trying to placate irrigators and farmers by concentrating so heavily on Menindee Lakes.
"Apparently evaporation only happens at Menindee Lakes, nowhere else," he said.
"They're also trying to placate South Australia, where they seem to think Menindee is the cause of all their problems."
The authors of the report - consultants SKM - had held information meetings but not consulted the public, Mr Hutton said.
"DRAG's main concern is damage to the environment and the economy of the region, and the recreational value to the region, especially Broken Hill, that will be lost.
"To destroy a lake system like Menindee for the want of 250GL, and more likely 125GL, it isn't worth the death and destruction of an icon."
Mr Stephens was particularly worried about the loss of Lake Wetherell.
Now Wetherell must retain water to supply Broken Hill. If that need is taken away the lake could be drained, taking away one of the few permanent wetlands in the Murray Darling system.
Ninety per cent of the others have been destroyed.
Calls from irrigators to put jobs before the environment were "short term and self-destroying", Mr Stephens said.
"If you don't have an environment, you don't have jobs. You don't have anything."
Liberal Member for Farrer Sussan Ley said that, if elected on Saturday, the coalition would not ignore the findings, but would heavily consult with the community before implementing anything.
"I'm sick of Menindee being tossed around like a political football," she said.
Ms Ley said the community had to join together and speak out against any moves to impose changes without notice, and that she'd be happy to be a part of the fight.

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Joint effort for golden marriage

Originally published: Thursday, 19th August, 2010

A local couple celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary today say their union had lasted due to good old TLC.

Sydney Hocking and Glenys Mew were married on August 19, 1960 at the Wesley Church by the Reverend Robert Lovell.
Sydney worked with Glenys' brother, Robin, and he met Glenys when Robin brought him home for dinner one night.
"It was about a four-year period before we got married," Mrs Hocking said.
"Mum had two weddings that year so the pressure was on a bit," she said.
At the time, Glenys was working as a clerk at Middleton's Jewellers, and in 1960 five female staff members left after getting married.
"I could have worked on, but I married so I had to relegate the job."
Mrs Hocking, who recently celebrated a birthday, said she did not want an open house for their anniversary, and instead opted for a family dinner at a restaurant.
The couple said they put the success of their marriage down to trust, love, care.
"You've got to put it down as a joint effort," Glenys said. "You've got to trust, love and care for each other."
The couple's only daughter Margaret sent a letter to local MP John Williams notifying him of the anniversary, and they received letters of congratulation from him, the Governor General Quentin Bryce, Prime Minister Julia Gillard, and Federal MP Sussan Ley.

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Coalition cuts will hit Broken Hill: ALP

Originally published: Thursday, 19th August, 2010

Coalition cuts to trade training centres would mean that one designated for Broken Hill High School would be scrapped, according to the ALP candidate for Farrer.

Christian Emmery said the proposed cuts were a threat to ongoing growth of business in Broken Hill and a threat to future economic development.
"Parents of children in Broken Hill should be worried about the risk to their kids' and the nation's future if Mr Abbott is elected," he said.
Besides the cuts to the trade training centres Mr Emmery said the coalition planned to cancel the Productivity Places Program, which is providing 711,000 training places across Australia to help those out of work find jobs and those with jobs improve their skills.
He said the cuts target every child in secondary school and particularly those who want to go on to learn a trade.
"They also target the on-going improvement of our schools."
Mr Emmery said the coalition's plans would mean a cut of 396,000 training places while industry is warning of a return to the Howard-era skills shortage.
"Also 120,000 students will miss out on computers and of the 670,000 computers already funded, they will become useless and out of date if the Liberals are elected and cut money for replacing and upgrading them."

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Clinic benefits debatable

Originally published: Wednesday, 18th August, 2010

Whether a GP Super Clinic would attract doctors to Broken Hill was on the agenda of yesterday's "Great Farrer Debate".

Liberal Member for Farrer Sussan Ley and Labor candidate for the seat Christian Emmery crossed swords in the ABC Radio Albury studio yesterday morning. The pair answered questions provided by listeners from across the electorate.
The first 30 minutes of their discussion was transmitted live over ABC Radio 99.9 for Broken Hill listeners. The station will broadcast the remaining 15-odd minutes this morning between 8.30am and 9am.
The debate underlined the decision facing Broken Hill voters. Ms Ley holds Farrer comfortably and is familiar with the issues facing the vast electorate. She asked voters to look at her party's record when they went to the polls.
She pointed to the Albury-Wodonga internal bypass, bringing drought relief support for farmers and a national water plan as achievements.
Ms Ley admitted she had been able to achieve a great deal more while the Coalition was in government, but had since 'stopped a lot of Labor's bad initiatives'.
Broken Hill, which is still somewhat of a Labor stronghold, has only known Ms Ley in opposition.
Mr Emmery, on the other hand, is a 20-year-old newcomer to politics. He has the courage to challenge the assistant Shadow Treasurer to a debate on the economy, but is inexperienced.
When asked to outline his vision for Farrer, Mr Emmery said he would make the seat marginal, which would attract more attention and funding. For voters watching Julia Gillard and Tony Abbott pour their energy into Queensland and Western Sydney, that may be enough.
Labor announced yesterday morning that Broken Hill would receive a $7 million GP Super Clinic if they were re-elected. The clinics are a cornerstone of Labor's health policy.
They seek to pull together a range of primary health services under one roof, improving care and providing more doctors for longer hours.
Mr Emmery was asked on-air yesterday where the doctors would come from.
"The doctors will come to Broken Hill. One of the things with a GP Super clinic is it trains doctors and nurses, the ones that we have promised in the next election for regional areas. These doctors will come from cities and they will be coming from immigrants that come to this country," he said.
It was "absolutely ridiculous" for Broken Hill people to have to go to Adelaide for health services, Mr Emmery said, and the Super GP Clinic would alleviate that.
Ms Ley asked if the clinic would have to wait for the other 30 clinics already promised by Labor three years ago to be built.
"We have a plan for health and it involves working with doctors, not necessarily putting up competing structures," he said.
Ms Ley said the Coalition would look to greater Medicare rebates and encouraging doctors to do more.
Putting up a super clinic would not necessarily bring new doctors to Broken Hill, she said.
Mr Emmery had called for the debate, and its focus on the economy. He said economic policy was the issue causing the most discussion around the electorate.
When asked if he was qualified to discuss such matters, the 20-year-old said it wasn't a matter of qualifications. He hadn't created the policy, he said, but he was there to defend it.
"I think it's more (about) comparing of stimulus and economic policy. I'm here to argue that what we have done has done good for Australia," he said.
Mr Emmery said Labor had taken the initiative to counter the Global Financial Crisis, with stimulus packages and strategies keeping the country out of recession.
Ms Ley said independent auditors and the Reserve Bank had found the stimulus didn't save 500,000 jobs, and that much of the money had not been rolled out yet.
Of the $16 billion allocated to the 'Building the Education Revolution' project, Ms Ley said three quarters of it had not been spent by the beginning of the year. She said that, if Australia's economy was on the road to recovery, it was time to stop the spending and get the budget back into surplus.
The candidates were asked how they would ensure farmers would received adequate compensation for the acquisition of their property.
Mr Emmery said he hadn't looked into that area, but that he would "try and get back to you".
Ms Ley said the issue was a terrible one for farmers, and that she was treating it thus.
When asked to sum up, and why they deserved votes, Mr Emmery cited an investment in infrastructure and sound management.
Ms Ley said voters should be alarmed about what a Labor Government would do, giving the example of putting Broken Hill's water supply in an aquifer without consultation.

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Pavilion namesake is stopped in his tracks

Originally published: Wednesday, 18th August, 2010

The Sulphide Street Railway and Historical Museum opened a new pavilion in honour of a long serving volunteer yesterday.

The new transport pavilion at the Museum was named after Ron Carter, in consideration of his 38 years as a volunteer at the Museum.
Railway Museum Secretary and Treasurer Christine Adams said the transport pavilion was named after Ron because he was one of the longest serving volunteers.
She said Mr Carter was chairman of the museum for 28 years.
Mr Carter said it came as a complete surprise to him to be have the pavilion named after him, adding that he felt it was a great honour.
"It's wonderful to have my name on the side of the pavilion," Mr Carter said.
Mr Carter worked for the Silverton Tramway Company for many years before it closed.
When it closed in 1970, Mr Carter realised all the valuable equipment should be preserved.
He said it was marvellous to see the equipment donated to the museum as it would have been sent for scraping.
"We would have lost a great piece of Broken Hill's History," Mr Carter said.
The pavilion was built to protect the pieces of memorabilia that were displayed on the platform of the station.
"The idea of building the transport pavilion was to put the memorabilia under cover ... for conservation purposes," Mrs Adams said.
In 1975, the Board of the Silverton Tramway Company donated the Sulphide Street Railway Station and three acres of land, plus all books and records, rolling stock and surplus equipment to the NSW Government Lands Department for museum purposes only.
The Museum was then opened in 1981 and a team of volunteers ensure the Museum is open to the public every day of the year, excluding Christmas Day and Good Friday. A large number of volunteers are ex-STC employees and share their wealth of information with visitors.
Mayor Wincen Cuy said it was because of these volunteers that the Museum is in operation.
"Volunteers keep the place (museum) open," Mayor Cuy said.
"(This museum) contributes to the economic wealth of the community ... it is a place of pride," he said.
"It is a significant and important part of our history."
Mayor Cuy offered his congratulations and praised everyone involved in erecting the pavilion.
"Congratulations to everyone involved and well done," he said.
Mayor Cuy also congratulated Ron Carter for his involvement in the Museum.
Mrs Adams is grateful for the support of the BH Community Foundation, the BH City Council and the BH Migrant Heritage Committee.
The next project for the Museum will be to establish a workshop where volunteers can maintain the collection. Mrs Adams said she would like to hear from groups or individuals who may be interested in restoration work.



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Course to boost future workforce

Originally published: Wednesday, 18th August, 2010

A new nursing certificate course which has been designed to boost the local workforce, started this week.

A total of 28 people have embarked on the new nursing certificate course with Greater Western Area Health Service.
This course is designed to help the region develop its own nursing workforce.
Resulting from a NSW Health initiative, the Greater Western AHS Centre for Rural and Remote Education (CRRE) is delivering the Certificate III in Health Services Assistance.
The course started on Monday with students here and in Orange.
It is a pre-employment course and is for those interested in a career as a nursing assistant in acute care in hospitals or other clinical facilities such as rehabilitation centres.
According to the Acting Director of the CRRE, Michele Pitt, the course is not available elsewhere.
"The establishment of the CRRE has provided the Area Health Service with a greater capacity to increase the delivery of qualifications that result in developing our future health care workforce," said Ms Pitt.
"This course allows local people living in our rural communities to start at the entry-level pathway into a health care career."
Ms Pitt said participants who complete the course can work as an Assistant in Nursing.
"Working as an Assistant in Nursing can help you pay your way while you complete further study. This qualification is also a pathway to other assistant roles in health care such as aged care and allied health assistance," Ms Pitt said.
The course is a full time 14-week course involving training and a clinical work placement.
Nurse Educator Kelly Dart said these courses help in a few different ways.
"We offer to do it quickly and the participants can get their foot in the door with the health department," Ms Dart said.
Ms Dart said the participants seem eager and enthusiastic and places were filling quickly for next year's course.


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Printer blamed for map error

Originally published: Wednesday, 18th August, 2010

A printer has been blamed for the wrong map of Farrer being added to a recent mail-out from Sussan Ley's office, although the same error was seen on her official website.

Ms Ley's Albury office manager Debbie Brown admitted to the error when the BDT contacted her yesterday, and said it was the first time anyone had noticed it.
The map leaves Wilcannia and Ivanhoe out of the electorate, and has printed on the bottom that it was current at November 2005.
The BDT also found the 2005 version of the map on Ms Ley's official website, her business card and her House of Rep's web page.
"It wasn't a deliberate mistake," Ms Brown said.
"We would (correct it) if we had time to send it out."
Just a few hours after being notified, Ms Brown released a media alert and removed the 2005 map from the website.

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Labor's big promise

Originally published: Tuesday, 17th August, 2010

Broken Hill will receive a new GP Super Clinic if the Labor Government is re-elected.

The Government would provide up to $7 million to set up the clinic, with a competitive process conducted by the Department of Health and Ageing to determine the successful operator.
Federal Labor Candidate for Farrer, Christian Emmery, said the announcement was great news for Broken Hill families.
"I am proud that a re-elected Gillard Labor Government will make this investment for the Broken Hill community," Christian Emmery said.
"Make no mistake, a GP Super Clinic will make a real difference. It will mean you will have access to a GP after hours.
"For an isolated area and a town with so many shift workers, a service like this is crucial."
GP Super Clinics are a key part of the Labor Government's health plan.
The clinic would provide after-hours access to a doctor to relieve pressure on the hospital.
Aimed at meeting community needs, it would bring a range of primary health services under one roof, including podiatry and physiotherapy, for example, and would save patients from having to be referred.
The clinics would also be used to train young doctors and introduce them to working in the bush. The registrars might then be likely to return when they graduate.
Broken Hill is classified as a District of Workforce Shortage, meaning there are not enough GPs in the town to care for the population.
Minister for Health and Ageing, Nicola Roxon, said a GP Super Clinic in Broken Hill would be an important addition to local medical services.
"The Gillard Labor government wants to invest in health services in communities like Broken Hill," the Minister said.
"Tony Abbott would take us backwards on health. He has committed to scrapping funding for GP Super Clinics, which means people in Broken Hill will miss out on the services this clinic will provide.
"If this is his view, Tony Abbott just does not have the judgment to be Prime Minister."

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Rallying around for kidneys

Originally published: Tuesday, 17th August, 2010

Floods and heavy rain hasn't stopped car rally drivers raising money for Kidney Health Australia.

The competitors in the Kidney Kar Rally arrived in the city yesterday about 4pm after driving 690 kms from Wilpena Pound in the Flinders Ranges.
Mike and Barbara Kluver said a few sections had to be cancelled due to the rain, with most of the 47 cars having to towed out after becoming bogged in the "bad lands" between Swan Hill and Murray Bridge.
But Mr Kluver said the event was great because of what participants got to see.
Competitors do little fundraising during the rally but have 12 months from the end of the competition until the start of the next one to raise the bulk of it.
"We had a car that raised $58,000, which is a great effort," said organiser Arthur Davis.
This year the drivers will cover 4800 kms in eight days.
They eat a three-course meal each night in each town, and Mr Davis said they also had a bit of a "muck around." But he said they were breath tested before they headed off the next day.
Today they leave at 7:30am for the 845km drive to Quilpie in Queensland.

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Assessing our city

Originally published: Tuesday, 17th August, 2010

Broken Hill is in the running again for the Tidy Towns competition.

The Keep Australia Beautiful NSW Tidy Towns Sustainable Communities Awards has sent assessor Doug McDonald to report on how the city is shaping up.
"It's early days in my assessing," he said yesterday. "I have another six towns to assess."
He said it was impressive to see how the city was working to retain its outback and heritage assests.
This is the 30th year that the Tidy Towns and Sustainable Communities program has been running, and 95 NSW towns have entered.
Nineteen assessors will travel across the State and assess the entrants this week and send their reports back for the judging in September.
Winners will be announced in November at an awards ceremony in Lockhart, the winner of the 2009 competition.
Broken Hill won main prize seven years ago.
Chairman of the local Tidy Towns committee Darriea Turley said their were positions available on the committee.
Ms Turley said people interested in "improving the environment and community of Broken Hill" should register interest.
The Tidy Towns committee is also involved in tree planting and lobbying for street cleaning.
Mr McDonald will visit Silverton, Wilcannia, White Cliffs, Ivanhoe, Menindee and Sunset Strip this week.

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Young gun takes on assistant treasurer

Originally published: Tuesday, 17th August, 2010

The 'Farrer Debate' is on this morning.

The Liberal Member for Farrer, Sussan Ley, will debate young ALP candidate Christian Emmery live on ABC Radio this morning.
Mr Emmery challenged Ms Ley to a debate to give voters a chance to "hear the stark contrast between the economic policies of Labor and Liberal".
Ms Ley, who is the Shadow Treasurer, is defending a safe Liberal seat from seven other candidates this election. Mr Emmery is 20 years old and is making his first foray into politics.
The debate can be heard from 8.35am on the local AM station. It is expected to run for about 30 minutes.
The ABC's Joseph Thompson will moderate the debate from his Albury studio, asking each candidate questions selected from voters across the vast electorate.

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Silver medal at national carnival

Originally published: Tuesday, 17th August, 2010

Isaac Cumming returned to the city on the weekend with a team silver medal from the National School Sport Australia Basketball Championships in Darwin.

Isaac was a member of the NSW State 12 Year Boys team following his selection at the PSSA State Basketball Carnival held in Sydney in May.
The competition was extremely strong with seven State teams competing in the 12 year boys' draw.
On day one of the competition the NSW boys played Queensland and won 58 to 40. They backed up again to win against South Australia 66 to 50.
Day two saw NSW defeat ACT 66 to 60. That afternoon the boys lost to Victoria 57 to 49 in a close but frustrating match where easy shots just weren't going into the basket.
The following day a win to NSW against Northern Territory (74 to 25) followed by a win against Western Australia (56 to 33) enabled NSW boys to be ranked as Number 1 after the minor rounds.
This was a good position to hold, with Queensland and Victoria ranked as number two and three going into the medal rounds. The worst NSW could do, would be to come away with a bronze medal.
Last Wednesday was a day off for players, where all the teams were entertained by the jumping crocodiles in a tourist day organised by the carnival executive. The warm, tropical weather was ideal for swimming in the pool and enjoying the relaxed Darwin lifestyle.
Thursday saw NSW play Queensland. Queensland led all game until the last quarter when NSW got it together, and with 20 seconds to go, the scores were level at 43 all. Queensland scored a "3 pointer" in the dying seconds to win the match 46 to 43. Queensland played a strong carnival and was the eventual gold medal winner of the carnival for 12 year boys.
With Victoria also losing to Queensland, the play-off for the silver or bronze medal was on Friday night between NSW and Victoria. It was a nail-biting game with each team going basket for basket.
NSW stayed strong to win in a close match, 58 to 52, to take home the silver medal. Victoria had won the gold medal for nine consecutive years, so for Victoria to take home a bronze medal this year was a sweet victory for both Queensland and NSW.
Isaac enjoyed playing basketball at this level of competition and was a valuable team member for his speed and ability to set up play.
The opportunity to represent both NSW and Broken Hill at a national carnival was a memorable experience.
This trip, however, could not have been possible without the support of the Broken Hill community, including individuals, businesses, and organisations too numerous to mention who supported Isaac's fundraising efforts to attend the National Carnival.



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Kokoda Challenge

Originally published: Monday, 16th August, 2010

Clubs NSW is sponsoring a local club employee to walk the Kokoda Track in September.

The Barrier Social Democratic Club's Hannah Mengersen will make the gruelling 96-kilometre trek in a few weeks' time.
"There was a nomination process and there were ten candidates all up and I was selected out of those," Hannah said.
"I had the opportunity to apply for this same program last year and I was unsuccessful in that attempt."
Ten people will be taking part in the trek, including four from NSW.
The trip is being held in association with the Max Potential program, where leaders in the community discuss ideas about success and leadership with young people.
Ms Mengersen said she knew it would be tough, but that the history and legacy would inspire her to keep going.
"The whole history of it; I've been told plenty of times that I'm really going to get a lot out of it in terms of what happened over there."

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Locals link to arts festival

Originally published: Monday, 16th August, 2010

The 41st annual Eisteddfod is fast approaching and organisers are hoping last year's success can be repeated.


It will be run over several days, beginning on Saturday with dance and instrumental performances.
Vocal and choral performances wil be held on Sunday, with school choirs, piano performances and pop star finals next Monday.
On the following day instrumental and speech and drama performances will be presented and the event will conclude on Wednesday next week with verse speaking choirs, and speech and drama.
The Eisteddfod Society's publicity officer, Merrilyn Podnar, said it is an ideal place for talented locals to perform in front of an audience.
The adjudicators include Michelle Carr for dance, Dr Kevin Cameron for instrumental, vocal and piano, and Louise Borgo for speech and drama.
"There are approximately 533 entries," Ms Podnar said.
Seven infant choirs and eight primary choirs will perform along with 10 infant speaking choirs and 10 primary choirs.
In the instrumental section there are three school bands and seven ensembles and groups.
For Saturday's dance locals can expect to see jazz, hip hop, creative movement, tap dancing, national song and dance and classical performances.
Bands and orchestras from Broken Hill, Menindee and Mildura will also perform.
The event is being held at the Entertainment Centre. Tickets will be sold at the door for $4 a session. Programs cost $4 and are available at Broken Hill Music and the South Newsagency.


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Drawing more from health

Originally published: Monday, 16th August, 2010

Health students and life drawing might not usually go together but under a locally-run program the concept could become more widespread.

In what West Darling Arts' James Giddey said is "probably an Australian first", a non-clinical art-focused component has been attached to the local university's extended clinical placement program.
Mr Giddey said Enrich, which he designed, aimed to integrate the students into the wider community but would also help their professional careers by considering art in health.

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Proof Costa doesn't care

Originally published: Friday, 13th August, 2010

The people of Wilcannia have been treated with disrespect from the state's water minister and it would cost the government votes, DRAG said.
The Darling River Action Group said it didn't believe that NSW Water Minister Phillip Costa had read a letter it sent to him which contained a petition and 500 signatures, most of the 800-strong town.
The petition called for the relocation of the Wilcannia weir from its current location of upstream near to the hospital to downstream below the bridge.
It hinged its case on the positive affects it would have in the town, including employment and tourism opportunities and community morale.
The letter and petition was tabled into Parliament by local MP John Williams last month but the response, received by DRAG yesterday, showed blatant disregard to the community's livelihood.
"From the letter it would seem that the Wilcannia weir is far too insignificant to warrant a decent reply," chairman Mark Hutton said.
"He basically hasn't even bothered to read the letter - he's just treating the Wilcannia people with disrespect.
"I expected a reasonable representation for the people of Wilcannia (not) blatant disregard to the livelihoods of the people of Wilcannia and surrounds."
Mr Costa's response said that the construction of new or raised weirs was contrary to the NSW Government's Weirs policy.
But Mr Hutton said petition didn't call for either construction of a new weir or elevating the weir.
"(Minister Costa) has basically said that he would be standing by the NSW Weirs policy," he said.
"It's not a new weir or a raised weir - just a relocation and refurbishment of an old weir."
Mr Hutton said the decision would cost NSW Labor votes.
"I don't like to get into the politics of things but I would say that Mr Costa and the NSW Government would have lost a lot of votes form the people in the Far West," he said.
But the DRAG said it would not give up and will now look for federal government help.
"We'll never give up, never give in," Mr Hutton said.
"I will write back to him and ask for a more detailed reply instead of just quoting from the weirs policy.
"We've sent a letter to Federal Member for Farrer Sussan Ley (to) see if we can do something through the federal government.
"I might just send it to the prime minister and see what happens."

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Ted to lead fate fun

Originally published: Friday, 13th August, 2010

Playtime Preschool will hold its annual fete on Sunday and they are hoping for good weather and a good turnout.

The fete will be held at the Patton Street Park between 10am and 2pm.
Activities for children young and old will be available with pony rides, a merry-go-round and a jumping castle.
The organiser, Heidi McDonald, said there will also be lucky dips and plaster mould paintings.
A barbeque and drinks will be on sale as well as coffee and cake.
Ms McDonald said Lead Ted will also be at the fete and locals are more than welcome to bring in items to sell.
"We will have bric-a-brac stalls for $10 a site," she said.
All the proceeds will go to resources for the children and the school.
Ms McDonald is hoping for good weather because last year's fete saw a drop in numbers due to the heat.
"We have a lot more stalls and we want more and more stalls," she said.
"We encourage the public to come and join in."
Ms McDonald thanked everyone involved in organising the fete.
For information or to set up a stall, contact Ms McDonald on 0427 506 524 or Playtime Preschool on 8088 1541.

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Do them a favour and desex your pet

Originally published: Friday, 13th August, 2010

The RSPCA is offering a 20 per cent discount on pet desexing this month in a bid to reduce overpopulation and disease.

August is National Desexing Month. RSPCA NSW Chief Veterinarian Dr Magdoline Awad said thousands of animals were euthanised in Australia every year because there weren't enough homes for them.
Desexing helps cut the number of unwanted pups and kittens received by animal shelters annually. It also helpt to prevent life-threatening illness.
"Desexing female dogs and cats actually helps decrease the incidence of breast cancer, as well as preventing ovarian and uterine cancer," said Dr Awad.
"It also prevents the chances of developing pyometra (an infection in the
uterus) which is a life-threatening condition," she said.
"Desexing also has similar benefits for male dogs, with the risk of some reproductive cancers, prostatic diseases, as well as perineal hernias reduced."
Desexing also brings behavioral benefits for male dogs and cats.
For male cats, stops behaviour such as fighting and roaming which often leads to their demise through accidents and injuries.
The event runs from August 23 to August 27.
For female dogs to be desexed it will cost $65 and for males $50. The cost also covers microchipping and vaccination.
For female cats is costs $50 and for males $35 with microchipping.
To register your pet or for more information contact the local RSPCA on 8087 7753.

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Parties prepared to see Lakes down the river

Originally published: Friday, 13th August, 2010

The loss of Menindee Lakes would be a tragedy for Australia, according to Darling River Action Group Chairman, Mark Hutton.

As the federal election looms, both of the major parties have vowed to spend money to promptly 'fix' the Menindee Lakes, with an eye to saving 200 billion litres of water a year.
Both parties have been light on detail, but proposals gathered by the Darling River Water Savings Project indicate that such a saving would see at least some of the Lakes, including Menindee and Cawndilla, drained.
In the face of such an information drought, Mr Hutton said it reads as if it is the beginning of the end for the lakes.
"I think the major political parties should be ashamed of themselves for using the fears of the people in the Murray-Darling area to buy votes," he said.
"They're promising things without showing the fine print. Voters have to guess what policy they're actually going to follow."
Menindee Lakes had worked perfectly well for 50 years, Mr Hutton said, and needed only a few minor engineering alterations.
"It's quite efficient compared to on-farm storages," he said.
"There's no use fixing something that isn't broken. The city has a secure water supply now."
Mr Hutton suspects the government (whoever it is in a fortnight) will be looking to decommission Cawndilla and Menindee at a minimum.
"I think that would be a tragic loss to Australia. The Menindee Lakes are one of the most beautiful, unpolluted and clean wetlands in Australia," he said.
"They are natural lakes. The people that seem to want them to go are those that want the water further upstream for irrigation.
"I think (politicians) grossly underestimate the recreational and spiritual value of the Menindee Lakes system, especially to the indigenous tribes that have populated it over the last 30,000 years.
"I would hope there would be a serious period of community consultation before any long-term plans were formalised."
DRAG had met with consultants when they began looking at the Lakes, but had not been invited back, Mr Hutton said.
"We told them exactly what they didn't want to hear," he said.
"I can only remember two public meetings that went for about two hours, and that's the only public consultation we've had."
The Government should listen and act on the concerns of those people that will be affected by the changes, Mr Hutton said.
But the community has long told them that the Menindee Lakes isn't a place that needs fixing.
"They just keep harping on. Menindee Lakes is not the problem, it's at the end of the Darling River system. They should start at the top," he said.
"I'm sure if they told Western Sydney that they will now be drinking bore water then governments would topple."

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Primary schools' athletes do battle

Originally published: Friday, 13th August, 2010

Morgan Street was victorious yesterday at the city's combined primary schools athletics carnival.

Burke Ward, Alma, North, Morgan Street, Railway Town, School of the Air and Sacred Heart all took part. Based on school numbers, Sacred Heart was second with Burke Ward third.
Organiser Julianne Highwood from Burke Ward said it all ran very smoothly despite the cold wind that had students rugging up and most parents watching from the warmth of their cars.
Students from years two to six competed, with the best going through to the next Barrier athletics carnival in Buronga.
"First, second and third in their race now go down to Buronga near Mildura," said Ms Highwood.
The best athletes from the Barrier carnival then go onto the final carnival in Sydney.
Field events were held on Wednesday due to the organisers not being able to fit both events into one day.
Folu Komolafe (SH), Maisie Ullrich (SH) and Lily Dart (BW) were the junior age champions at yesterday's event.
Rourke Turner (Nth) and Jasmine Simmons (MS) were the 11 years champions, and Ester Colley (Nth) and Tom Ragenovich were the senior champions.

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Book sheds new light on local Labor legend

Originally published: Thursday, 12th August, 2010

An ex-local has written a biography of the legendary Labor great Percy Brookfield which brings new information about him to light.

University lecturer Dr Paul Adams' book, titled "The Best Hated Man in Australia: The Life and Death of Percy Brookfield," gives new insights into the life of the late trade union leader and State MP.
"I'd been interested in left wing politics since I was a kid," Dr Adams said.
His fascination with Percy Brookfield started around seven years ago when he first saw Brookfield's memorial at the cemetery.
"When my Nana died I went out to the Broken Hill Cemetery and put some flowers on her grave and I noticed the memorial," he said.
He then spent time researching and delving into the past, and discovered that biographies written about the local legend had not been completed.
Dr Adams chose the title after discovering writings by Donald Grant, a prisoner whom Brookfield tried to set free.
During World War One he was called a coward by every capitalist newspaper in the country because he led a campaign against conscription and opposed the war.
"Of all the hated men of the time, he was the best," Grant wrote.
Dr Adams said among the most interesting finds he made in his research was a local miner named Paul Freeman who was deported and stateless for some time before returning to town as a spy and under-cover agent.
Since his death 89 years ago, Brookfield's legacy was still evident in town with displays, paintings and an avenue street named after him.
The book will be launched at the Trades Hall tomorrow at 5pm, with former State Labor MP Peter Black as guest speaker.
The launch is open to anyone with an interest in the city's history.
Paul Adams holds a PhD from the University of Sydney and now lives in Armidale NSW where he teaches media at the University of New England.

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Cook-up to aid animals

Originally published: Thursday, 12th August, 2010

Locals are being asked to dig deep into their pantry to help the animals at the local RSPCA.

The RSPCA will be holding its annual cupcake day on Monday where locals can donate cup cake ingredients or bake cup cakes for the shelter to sell on the day.
Shelter manager Merridy Wall says the money raised will go towards improving facilities at the animal refuge.
Ms Wall said new toys, beds, and equipment were just some of the things that will be purchased with the money.
Organisations are welcome to hold their own stall, and all money can be dropped in to the shelter.
Donations of cake mixes and ingredients can be left at the shelter by Friday, and donations of cup cakes can be made on the day.
The shelter asked that if eggs were to be donated, they must come from cage-free farms.
Ms Wall said their were also many animals still looking for a loving home to go to.
A three-month-old brown kelpie named Steele is just one of the many wormed and vaccinated animals at the RSPCA.
"Obedience is necessary for a dog like this," she said.
Kelpies' enjoy walks and exercise, so an owner with the time to dedicate to the animal is important.

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Less taxing

Originally published: Thursday, 12th August, 2010

Low income earners can breath a sigh of relief with the return of tax office's free "Tax Help" program.

Tax Help has more than 1,300 trained community volunteers, and the Charles Rasp Library is helping by providing computers and space for the local ones.
Honorary secretary of Broken Hill Community Inc., David McGrath, said the service was open to anybody with a taxable income of $40,000 or less.
"We've all got to do our tax returns, and for the low income earners it's an easier way of getting it done without having to pay the high fees that they normally charge," Mr McGrath said.
He said the two local volunteers were certified assessors who had gone through the ATO's training program.
Librarian Denise Orr said the library was the perfect place to hold community service.
"Obviously they were looking for a venue in the community that was available on the weekends, and the library is open on the weekends, so I guess it was a good public place for it to happen," she said.
Tax Commissioner Michael D'Ascenzo said the program was available to people with straightforward tax matters, especially those preparing a tax return for the first time.
"The volunteers are available to help people prepare and lodge their tax return and understand what can be claimed as a tax deduction and how to claim it."
This year, Tax Help will be able to lodge tax returns electronically using e-tax, meaning their returns are processed faster.
The program has been running for 22 years, with over 64,000 people using it last year.
Tax Help is available until October and people interested in making an appointment may contact Broken Hill Community Inc on 8087 8903.

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Cassie in the running for racing's Gold Logie

Originally published: Thursday, 12th August, 2010

Local harness racing driver Cassie Robinson has been nominated for the Nobel Pace Prize, the NSW Harness Racing equivalent to the Gold Logies.

The award recognises 12 individuals in harness racing who show passion, good sportsmanship and strong character.
Three nominees are chosen each month until September and the person with the most votes is put through as a nominee for the prestigious award.
Ms Robinson said it was a big honour because only 12 people are nominated throughout the state.
"And for the town and where we are, it's a pretty big deal," she said.
She also said that with harness racing not very big in the town, and Broken Hill being a small town, it was more of an achievement.
The 21-year-old car detailer said she had a passion for the sport, and "just loves driving".
"Everyone one wants to drive a winner; but it's always good to get up and train and drive the horses."
Cassie said she and the trainer have had a good season, even with some of the horses being out.
"(It's been a) really good season for me and the trainer."
Locals can vote for Cassie by logging onto the Harness Racing NSW website (www.hrnsw.com.au).

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Lakes deal done

Originally published: Wednesday, 11th August, 2010

Labor's plan for the Menindee Lakes was a great idea, but left a lot of questions unanswered, according to the Darling River Action Group (DRAG).

DRAG's Barney Stephens yesterday commended Labor on continued water buybacks, but said their plan for Menindee Lakes was murky.
Stan Dineen, a member of the recently wound-up Darling River Water Savings Program, agreed. He said the community needed to be consulted before work began.
Prime Minister Julia Gillard announced yesterday that her government had signed an agreement on the Lakes' future with the NSW Government.
A "final feasibility assessment", to be finished by October, aims to kick off work on the Menindee Lakes to improve storage efficiency and operating arrangements. Water entitlements would then be transferred to the Commonwealth.
In return, the commonwealth would provide up to $300 million to help secure urban water supplies across regional New South Wales.
The assessment is also expected to outline a plan to 'drought proof' Broken Hill by using an aquifer.
Ms Gillard said the changes would save 200 billion litres of water each year, which would complement water the government had already bought back from irrigators to improve environmental flows.
The release of the Murray Darling Basin Authority's draft report on returning environmental flows to the basin has been delayed until after the election.
But Ms Gillard yesterday committed to keep buying back water until environmental flows had been restored, whatever the cost.
Mr Stephens said that $100 million had been put aside to be spent at the Lakes, leaving some works in doubt, and that the aquifer plan needed more information.
"Who is going to pay for the upkeep of the aquifer? The people of Broken Hill, or the people who benefit from the water save?" asked Mr Stephens.
Mr Stephens said there was little detail on what exactly would happen to the Menindee Lakes. He hoped the Murray Darling Basin Commission would assume control of the system.
However, he said DRAG fully supported Labor's water buybacks.
"I congratulate Penny Wong on what she has already done with the buybacks.
"They seem to be the only way the Commonwealth can fix it. It seems they can't put water back without paying for it, even though they're paying a lot more than the irrigators did in the first place," he said.
"I'm sure (irrigators) would support the plan to pay for water."
Stan Dineen said an aquifer was acceptable as long as it provided a good quality water supply.
"To ensure that you'd probably need a pilot plant running continuously for 18 to 24 months," he said.
River water would need to be pumped into the aquifer, Mr Dineen said, and treated both before and after, likely with a reverse osmosis plant.
While the aquifer would probably be used only once or twice a decade, Mr Dineen said maintenance of the system would cost millions of dollars each year.
"I'm sure they hope that would be picked up by Broken Hill. I don't think the community could afford it," he said.
Mr Dineen said that if Broken Hill was left to fund the upkeep it would mean an extra $350-550 on every water bill.
"We need to be careful something isn't pushed through parliament without consultation. We need time to look at all the pros and cons," he said.
"Our water supply is very secure now. This community shouldn't have to pay if we have to change for someone else's benefit."

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'Spend more' on mental health

Originally published: Wednesday, 11th August, 2010

Despite the cold and wet start yesterday a dedicated group of people still turned out to express their political opinions on the lack of mental health funds.

A small group attended the candle light vigil in Town Square yesterday evening to express their thoughts and concerns on the issues of mental health.
A web-based lobby group, GetUp, has given locals a way to express their opinions by holding a candle light vigil. GetUp is a political internet based lobby group focussing on the important issues.
Hugh Gough, a member of the group, said the vigil was about attempting to draw attention to the significant under-funding of mental health issues.
Mr Gough, a bed and breakfast owner, developed an interest in the group because he believes it is a good way to get your voice heard.
"It's really good for people to be able to express their views on popular issues without too much effort," Mr Gough said.
GetUp's silent vigil highlighted local issues, including the economy, immigration and climate change, to those running for the electorate of Farrer at the upcoming Federal Election.
GetUp's total membership is 375,000 people across Australia.
"... As such it represents a high proportion of public opinion," Mr Gough said.
Mr Gough was pleased by the turnout from the community but was upset to see that none of the candidates for Farrer attended the event.
"(I'm) delighted with the turnout ... I thought I would be the only candle in the square," Mr Gough said.
"We're saddened by the lack of politicians ...  and we suggest it's time to take notice."
"If politicians want to keep their snout in the trough they better pay attention to GetUp."
The event was held throughout Australia with other GetUp groups "doing the same thing" according to Mr Gough.
Mr Gough said 45 per cent of the total population in Australia were affected by mental health issues.
According to the Mental Health Council of Australia almost half the population experience a mental health disorder at some point in their lifetime.
Mr Gough put it out there for all politicians that it is time "look after those people".
Mr Gough said the vocal point of the issue was mental health and locals who attended the vigil were trying to push for a change.
Another issues was also addressed, which Mr Gough felt strongly about and that was being enrolled to vote.
Mr Gough said there are 1.4 million eligible voters who are not enrolled to vote and that this is another of GetUp's focus points.
"Even an invalid vote has a purpose ... it shows that you are not happy with something," he said.

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New road potholed

Originally published: Wednesday, 11th August, 2010

Parts of the Thomas Street roadway have started to crumble only 12 months after they were laid.

A section of Thomas Street in front of the hospital was replaced last year. The street was widened so that 29 extra car parks could be created along the busy stretch, which also includes two private medical practices.
The work was done by City Council and a local contractor. It was delayed at the time due to heavy rain.
The project was finished last August.
Today, cracks are appearing and potholes have broken open in the smooth new roadway. Some of them seem to be seeping water from underneath.
Council's Infrastructure Manager Paul DeLisio said there were sections of the road that were obviously failing.
"We're in the process of addressing that," he said.
Makeshift repairs undertaken recently had failed, he said, and major repairs were planned for the next couple of weeks.
The road's sub-base has failed, causing the problem, despite quality control measures that were in place during construction.
Council doesn't know why the road has failed, nor where the water is coming from.
The Thomas Street reconstruction was part of a parcel of works completed by Council and the contractor.
Mr DeLisio said the work had been generally quite good, but that this failure had been disappointing.
While it was too early to say for sure, Mr DeLisio did not anticipate repairs to incur any major cost.

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Robins in rare field of racers

Originally published: Tuesday, 10th August, 2010

Former local Mick Robins travelled back to the city yesterday as an ambassador for the Victoria Racing Club's Melbourne Cup tour.
The octogenarian, who worked as an underground miner for 10 years from 1968, is one of only of four trainers in the 150 year history of the Melbourne Cup to have taken a horse to consecutive wins, with his 1968 and 1969 cup winning horse Rain Lover.
The others were Etienne de Mestre, who trained Archer to wins in 1861, the first time the Melbourne Cup was run, and again in 1862, Bart Cummings, who trained Think Big in 1974 and 1975, and Lee Freedman who trained the three-times winner, champion mare Makybe Diva.
Mr Robins is just one of a number of local links to the race that stops the nation; another is David James, a member of the Syndicate of Seven and the owner of the 1895 Melbourne-cup winning horse, three-year-old filly Auraria.
Mr James was a contractor, mining promoter and politician. He established a stud, producing horses which won races in Adelaide and Melbourne.
Mr Robins will accompany the Cup on part of its 220-day global voyage.
He has been around horses for most of his life before a lucky turn of the penny led him to train Rain Lover.
In 1969, Rain Lover was only the second horse in the history of the Melbourne Cup to win the great race twice; the other was inaugural Melbourne Cup winner Archer.
"It took a little boy from Broken Hill to break a record that had stood for 107 years," he said.
After leaving Broken Hill in 1962 Mr Robins went to Adelaide to work with trainer Graeme Heagre, where, his lucky turn came along. Mr Heagre had sold a horse Tobin Bronze to an American before following it over there.
He left Mr Robins a stable full of horses to train - one of them being Rain Lover.
"It was the lucky turn of the penny," he said.
"If Tobin Bronze wasn't sold to America I would never have won a Melbourne Cup. It was like a fairy tale."
He said he remembered the 1968 Cup well.
"It was the first Melbourne Cup I'd ever seen," Mr Robins said.
"I was thinking how could we win this there's 85,000 people here. Three hours later (Rain Lover) had won the race by eight lengths in the fastest race that was ever run."
Mr Robins said another significant thing happened on that day - racing great Bart Cummings congratulated him on the race, in which he beat a number of Bart's horses.
"I had asked Bart for a job but didn't get one," Mr Robins said.
"He said 'Good on ya, son ... I should've given you a job that day' - he was only two years older than me."
Meanwhile Mr Robins said while there was no doubt Bart Cummings was a racing legend his own figures speak volumes.
"(Bart's) had 75 runners and won 12, I've had three and won two and I reckon he's the best trainer in the world."
Mr Robins now lives in Victoria, but visits the city yearly to see his sister. He said he thinks of coming back home.
"When I come back you think you could've been here still living and it wouldn't worry me. I could end up back here."

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Cup favourite

Originally published: Tuesday, 10th August, 2010

The most coveted trophy in the nation visited the city yesterday as part of a global tour to celebrate the running of the 150th Melbourne Cup.

This year's Melbourne Cup is worth $150,000, is made of 18 carat gold and weighs 4.5 kilograms.
Victoria Racing Club historian Dr Andrew Lemon, who is travelling with the Cup, said it contained two kilograms of gold.
"It has as much gold as you can get in a trophy before it bends," Dr Lemon said.
Broken Hill is one of 42 places the Cup will visit this year on a 220-day tour around the world. The Cup has already visited London, Dublin, Hong Kong, Singapore, Los Angeles and Mumbai. It started its domestic leg last week and it will soon visit New Zealand.
Mayor Wincen Cuy said being part of the international tour was a good plug for the city.
"I think it's absolutely fabulous, from a community point of view, having one of the most sought after prizes in Australian sport in the city," Mayor Cuy said.
"To be a part of the international landscape is great for the city.
"Broken Hill also has the iconic landscape (and) connecting a great part of Australian history with another part of Australian history it has some synergies to it."
The Cup was escorted on the city tour by Mick Robins, a former local and trainer of back to back Melbourne Cup winning horse Rain Lover, Melbourne Cup winning jockey John Marshall, who rode Bart Cummings trained Rogan Josh to victory in 1999 and Victorian Racing Club historian Dr Andrew Lemon.
Dr Lemon said the Cup has only ever been made and designed by four goldsmiths; the first was Melbourne goldsmith James Steeth in 1919.
When he passed away the honour went to his son Maurie who was in charge of the "greatest trophy in Australian folklore" until he died in 1970.
His young apprentice, Lucky Rocca, took up the reins next, making the Cup for the next 30 years.
The last 10 years the Cup has been designed and made by Queensland jeweller Stuart Bishop from Hardy Brothers, which Dr Lemon said caused no interstate rivalry.
"It's the Melbourne Cup but it's not Melbourne's cup," he said.
"It's Australia's cup and it always has been."
Contrary to popular belief, Dr Lemon said the winner of the first Melbourne Cup, in 1861, NSW horse Archer, did not win a trophy.
"Archer never got a trophy," Dr Lemon said.
"You will read that he won a gold watch but I can't find it. The only prize was the (930 pounds), but even that's argued about."
Dr Lemon said this year's trophy was larger and had returned in size to that of the Cup won by the great Phar Lap in 1930. The Cup was resized after that year after the Great Depression and tax changes took hold.
The Cup toured many of the city's iconic locations including the School of the Air, the town square, Aruma Lodge, the line of lode, the Regional Art Gallery, Silverton and the Mundi Mundi Plains.
The Cup also visited the Syndicate of Seven statues, where it was photographed with the David James' statue. Along with being one of the forefathers of Broken Hill Mr James owned the 1895 Melbourne Cup winning horse Auraria.

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Ley accepts debate

Originally published: Tuesday, 10th August, 2010

Local Federal MP Sussan Ley has accepted a challenge to a public debate from the Labor candidate for Farrer, Christian Emmery.

Mr Emmery challenged Ms Ley to a public debate on the economy yesterday.
He said voters have a right to know where Ms Ley stands.
"The voters of Farrer have a right to know where Sussan Ley stands on the huge cuts to the economy that Tony Abbott intends to make, the cuts to services, the cuts to infrastructure development, cuts which will increase unemployment.
"We haven't heard from Sussan Ley as the Shadow Assistant Treasurer; yes she is the Shadow Assistant Treasurer and clearly on her website she considers she has the qualifications for the task."
Ms Ley's website shows her tertiary qualifications include a Bachelor of Economics, Masters of Taxation Law and a Masters of Accounting.
She has previously been employed as the Director of Technical Training with the Australian Taxation Office.
Her website states she aims to "apply her formal economic knowledge to work in the best interests of her constituents in rural and regional Australia".
"The fact is Sussan Ley has not been heard on the economy, she has not promoted or defended the appalling economic policies of the Coalition," Mr Emmery said.
Mr Emmery has written to Ms Ley to formally challenge her to a debate.
"I am available anytime before the election to debate the economy - I'm available any place.
"I'm happy to travel to Broken Hill, Deniliquin, Albury, Ivanhoe, Holbrook, Balranald or any other town in the electorate.
"The families, farmers and small businesses of Farrer deserve to know what are the economic priorities of their representatives," Mr Emmery said.
Ms Ley welcomed the challenge, saying she would be "delighted to accept".
Ms Ley did however say that Mr Emmery "could have just called her to arrange the debate" instead of sending a letter.
"I (am) delighted to accept and look forward very much to making the case for why the Coalition's approach to economic management will result in a more productive and prosperous Australia," Ms Ley said.
She also asked Mr Emmery to contact her to make a time for the debate.

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Olympic legends for Central past players reunion

Originally published: Tuesday, 10th August, 2010

Olympic legends Phil Smyth and Rachael Sporn will be the guest speakers at this Sunday's Central Past Players Reunion.

Smyth is a legend of Australian sport, making his name and earning his reputation on the basketball court.
Nicknamed "The General" for his ability to control the game, he played an astonishing 365 games for Australia, captaining his country for 14 years, and wearing the green and gold at four Olympics and five World Championships.
Domestically The General won three National Basketball League Championships as a player with the Canberra Cannons and three as head coach of the Adelaide 36ers.
Smyth showed his ability to perform on the big stage by winning the finals series MVP in 1988 with the Cannons.
With a remarkable record like this, it's no wonder that he has been inducted into the Australian Hall of Fame and he has an Order of Australia Medal for services to sport.
Due to his vast experience Smyth is in regular contact with a number of national and international sporting superstars, offering advice and help when sought.
With a remarkable trail of achievements and statistics, The General was sought after for media comments and opinions concerning all things basketball.
He has worked for Fox Sports, Channel 7 and various radio stations and in his time in the media worked with broadcasters such as Bruce McAvaney, John Casey and Drew Morphett.
As well as playing on the big stage, Smyth has also worked on the big stage, covering events such as the Sydney Olympics and Melbourne Commonwealth Games.
As well as KG & The General, Smyth writes for The Advertiser and appears on Channel 7.
A former Captain of the Australian Opals, Rachael Sporn's list of sporting achievements make impressive reading.
Just a few include the Australian national team since 1989, the World Championship Team in 1990 and 1994 and the team's Bronze Medal in 1998.
However, her proudest moments have been with Australian Olympic "Opals" basketball team - which won a bronze medal at the 1996 Atlanta Games and silver at the 2000 Sydney Games.
Sporn typifies the Australian sporting hero. Like every hero the story must start somewhere; for Rachael her journey to become one of Australia's most recognisable female basketball players began in the Victorian countryside as a junior at the age of nine.
Success has not just followed Rachael internationally, but also locally where she has become the face of South Australian women's basketball as captain of the Adelaide Quit Lightning Team. Praise too has echoed across the nation when she was named the WNBL's Most Valuable Player in 1996 and 1997 and her induction into the Australian Sporting Hall of Fame in 1996.
The many years of hard effort and toil for Rachael has culminated in her recruitment to the Detroit Shock in the American WNBA for the 1998, 1999 and 2001 seasons.
The level of competition in America is intense but Rachael has always risen to the challenge. Perhaps Rachael's success is due to her passion for sport, not content just to play sport, taking on the rigors of university at Underdale College doing Secondary Physical Education and Mathematics.
Anyone with an interest in football or basketball is encouraged to attend. Both quests will impart their knowledge on what it takes to make it to the elite level in any chosen sport.
Doors will open at 11am at the Central Football Club with tickets available at the door.

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Silent vigil to shine light on local issues

Originally published: Monday, 9th August, 2010

A internet group aimed at giving everyday people a way to express their political opinions has gathered dedicated local supporters.

GetUp is an internet lobby group that allows members to voice their opinions on major issues such as the economy, immigration and climate change.
Bed and breakfast co-owner Hugh Gough is one local that has developed an interest in the group.
"It's really good for people to be able to express their views on popular issues with out too much effort," Mr Gough said yesterday.
One issue the busness owner feels strongly about is mental health. He thinks it is under-funded and that through the forum he and others can push for a change.
"(We'll be trying to) bring it to all the candidates in the upcoming election," he said.
Being enrolled to vote is another issue Mr Gough feels strongly about, and says 1.4 million Australians are not registered to vote.
"Even a invalid vote has a purpose as it shows that you are not happy with something.
"Broken Hill is a crucible of intelligent political thinkers."
He is taking part in a silent vigil tomorrow where locals are invited to hold candles in the hope of getting messages across to the eight Farrer candidates.
"A small group of concerned Broken Hill citizens who all have a connection with GetUp will be gathering at the Town Square at 5pm.
"The stronger the message to the candidates the better."
He said he also intended to invite the candidates.
"I intend to do so via the internet as soon as I can."
Another local interested in the GetUp group, Roger Edwards, said he too would be joining his mate at the vigil.
"The vigil is something I could support. And you don't have to be a member of GetUp to be involved in this. I'm just a concerned resident."

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New wheels for tramway

Originally published: Monday, 9th August, 2010

A dedicated bicycle path will soon be built from the city to Silverton.

The $100,000 recreational bicycle way will run for 16 kilometres along the old Broken Hill to Silverton tramway line.
City Council's sustainability manager Peter Oldsen said yesterday that Council would provide cash and materials for the project, including material salvaged from the redevelopment of the former Central Power Station.
"Council will provide $10,000 plus salvage materials from the film studio," he said.
The cycle way would begin on the Willyama Common and end at Silverton but the precise start and end points are still to be determined.
At its ordinary monthly meeting last week the Council voted to get behind the project which is being led by the Land and Property Management Authority and supported by the Silverton Village Committee (SVC).
The SVC secured a $33,750 Sport and Recreation grant for the project and Mr Oldsen said the remainder of the money would come from the LPMA and other sources.
"The LPMA will provide additional funds and there is the potential for the Silverton Village Committee to also contribute."
The project will require quite a bit of work including grading and rolling the former tramway route, erecting up to 16 kilometres of new fences, buying and installing signs and designing, making and installing barriers and bridges.
Mr Oldsen said the bicycle way would also have two shelters along the track providing shade and water.
"Spots where you can pull up and have a bit of a rest."
Council has had some early discussions with TAFE regarding the use of apprentices to carry out some of the building work and the LMPA had also discussed what role TAFE could play in the project.
Mr Oldsen said the project should be finished in about a year.
"This time next year we should be pretty close."

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Watering holes now in tourism awards

Originally published: Monday, 9th August, 2010

For the first time, pubs have been invited to enter the NSW Tourism Awards.

Minister for Tourism, Jodi McKay, said good pubs could add something special to a visitor's experience.
"The local pub is often one of the first places that visitors look for to get a better feel for what's going on in the community, particularly in regional NSW," she said.
"As well as offering great food and accommodation they can also show how friendly the locals are and give tourists lots of reasons to want to come back to the area."
Ms McKay said the new award would acknowledge hotels that demonstrated passion and enthusiasm for making the visitor experience the best it could be.
The award will focus on both the service and facilities offered by local pubs that add that "special something" to the tourism experience," she said.
"Regardless of the pub's size, location or turnover, pub owners and operators should consider entering this award."
Terry Barclay, part-owner of the Junction Hotel, believes that the inclusion of pubs and hotels will benefit Broken Hill.
"I think anything that will increase awareness for people out of town is important," Mr Barclay said.
Mr Barclay said recognition of local pubs and hotel is a postive thing.
"Absolutely ... Hotels play a key role ... (we) get a lot of tourists here ... if you have a good feed, the service is good and the setting ... tourists will go away and tell other people."
The Junction Hotel is not registered for the 2010 Tourism Awards but Mr Barclay said he was willing to "have a crack" at the awards.
Mr Barclay said he finds he gets a lot of business from the Silver Haven Motel and the Lakeview Caravan park.
Submissions are due on August 21. The 2010 NSW Tourism Award winners will be announced in November.

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Fighting for Farrer

Originally published: Thursday, 5th August, 2010

Federal member Sussan Ley said the contest for the seat of Farrer was going to be tough.

Ms Ley, who has held the seat for the past nine years, won the 2007 federal election with 57.7 per cent of the vote.
Despite her strong support Ms Ley said it would still be a hard race.
"There are eight candidates; it's still quite a contest," she said.
The other candidates are Labor's Christian Emmery, Independent Louise Burge, The Greens' Peter Carruthers, Australian Democrat Stephen Bingle, the Christian Democratic Party's James Male, the Secular Party of Australia's Mathew Crothers and Independent Jason Clancy.
While Farrer continues to be a safe conservative seat, Broken Hill residents still overwhelmingly vote Labor. Broken Hill's Alma School polling booth recorded the highest Labor vote of the electorate.
Voter Meredith Oakey said the Coalition had some good policies but she wanted to see Julia Gillard have a go at the top job.
"She's a woman, give her a go. She can't go any worse than the men."
Ms Oakey said the Coalition's paid parental leave scheme would be good for working mothers despite it appearing to be an acknowledgement that on many occasions women were still being paid less than men.
"Definitely. Women are paid less than men," Ms Oakey said.
"I think it would be good for other women who are in the workforce who want paid leave - it's a good thing.
"I don't mind that it's going to be capped. I don't think everyone should be paid astronomical wages.
"I think we pay enough for the government's superannuation and redundancies and if we could get away with paying that then the country would be a lot better off."
If the Coalition was elected the scheme, which would not start until July 2012, would allow either the mother or the father to take six months off work to spend time with their newborn babies while being paid but only at the mother's pay rate - capped at $150,000 for six months.
But Ms Ley defended the scheme saying it was designed to keep women in the workforce.
"I don't think it is an acknowledgement of women getting paid less than men. It's directed at mothers," she said.
"I'm a passionate supporter of women getting paid (the same as) men.
"In a lot of households now the women earn more than the men."
A little more than two weeks out from the federal election Ms Ley said voters did not care about the big national issues but were more concerned about issues that affected their lives.
"People are more concerned with what's happening with their own (area)," she said.
"Cost of living increases, electricity, health and water.
"In the (Murray region) water (is a big issue) and certainly people in Broken Hill are concerned that we shore up Broken Hill's water supply."
Ms Ley had her first visit to the city since the election was called last weekend when she attended the Landcare tree planting day.
Yesterday she met with irrigators at Wentworth and with Wentworth Shire Council.
She will be in Broken Hill tomorrow night and will meet with voters in Wilcannia and White Cliffs over the weekend before returning to the city on Monday.


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Scallywag talks safety

Originally published: Thursday, 5th August, 2010

Scallywag the Scarecrow visited the students of Rainbow Preschool yesterday to give a special message about fire safety.

A preschool teacher from Beechworth in Victoria, Vicki Connell, visited the local preschool to show children how to be safe on the farm.
The "Farm Safety Is Fun" program, developed and run by Vicki, who doubled as the scarecrow, used role play, music, puppetry, movement and humour to reach the children with messages about farm safety.
"The family farm is both a home and a hazard, especially for children," Vicki said.
"One child dies on average every 10 days in Australia through a farm related incident."
Vicki took notice a few years ago when children at a rural preschool where she taught suffered more than the "usual" amount of injuries on their farms.
She found there was no farm safety information specifically aimed at children. So she began to develop it herself.
"Safety messages need to be in a different 'language' for children because they see the world differently to adults and most certainly from a different height," Vicki said.
Scallywag is part of a touring show aimed at children up to the age of 12.
Vicki will also train the teachers, in collaboration with Sydney's Lady Gowrie Child Centre, on observation and documentation and provided Rainbow Preschool with a resource kit.
"At each town we visit we'll be delivering a farm safety resource kit, a parent workshop and professional development training for teachers in collaboration with Sydney's Lady Gowrie Child Centre, which provides quality leadership for early childhood professions," Vicki said.
For more information about safety educational resources visit www.safetyaroundfarmseducation.com.



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Field Naturalists celebrate 90 years

Originally published: Thursday, 5th August, 2010

The Barrier Field Naturalists Club will be celebrating its anniversary today by holding an exhibition at the Albert Kersten Mining and Mineral Museum.

The exhibition, "90 Years of the Barrier Field Naturalists" will be opened by city archivist, Brian Tonkin.
It opens at 6.30pm and will showcase the history of the club.
The exhibition will be open until September 11 and members of the public are invited to attend. Admission to the exhibition is free for local residents.
When the club first formed, members met at the Technical College in Argent Street.
They were interested in investigating the natural environment in the West Darling area and recording the achievements of some of the pioneers in the district.
The exhibition showcases the history of the group's monthly field trips to observe plants and animals that lived in this unique semi-arid region.
Records were made of birds, reptiles, animals and unusual plants found on properties visited.
Graziers always welcomed club members, as they were interested in the wildlife living on their properties.
Flower shows featuring wild flowers were well attended and very much enjoyed by the people. Local wild flowers were collected and some were sent from other states for display at the shows.
In return, the club also collected and sent flowers to Western Australia, Sydney and Adelaide clubs, by air, for their shows.
Before the formation of a historical society, the Barrier Field Naturalists researched the early history of the pioneers, and erected commemorative plaques on buildings or on cairns, as permanent tributes to the great achievements of those times.
These plaques still provide points of interest for locals and visitors.
The club was greatly involved in caring for the environment. Working closely with mine managers and the council to promote the use of trees, club members planted many trees in parks, including some at Penrose Park in Silverton, and those in McGillivray Drive at the foot of the line of lode, which is a memorial to the founding president.
The club now supports Landcare BH in continuing this important work on their regular monthly meeting nights. There are guest speakers and presentations on natural history topics, in a friendly and relaxed manner.
The club aims to promote friendship and enjoyment through the study of nature.
For further information contact Ken Mills on 8087 1575.

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Locals to take on Riverland

Originally published: Thursday, 5th August, 2010

A combined Broken Hill men's soccer team will play Riverland in a curtain raiser to the A-League match between Adelaide United and Newcastle on Friday at Hindmarsh Stadium.

The team has been named "Broken Hill United" to signify the approach and co-operative philosophy that the clubs and players have bought to the team, according to the local association.
Friday's game kicks off at 4.45pm.
During the year the BH Soccer Association has worked in conjunction with their four affiliated clubs - Alma, Celtic United, West Panthers and St Joseph's - to compile a senior men's squad for competition at regional tournaments.
The squad was established to compete at the Leslie Refrigeration Interleague Challenge against Sunraysia and the Riverland.
The match against the Riverland during the Interleague Challenge was closely contested, with Riverland emerging victors, 2-0.
The BH United squad has been strengthened for the A-League curtain raiser match.
It is comprised of a mixture of youth and experience with a number of key players who were unavailable for the Interleague match included.
Broken Hill Coach George Callegher is confident his team has a good chance.
Goalkeeper Nathan Gaegler recalls playing as reserve goal keeper at Hindmarsh for Broken Hill as a 15-year-old and is looking forward to repeating the experience as number one goalie 15 years later.
He is also the captain of the team and said he hoped to keep a clean sheet this time around; the last time he let one goal through.
The BH United squad: 1 Nathan Gaegler (C), 2 Craig Stephens, 3 Gregory Wilkins, 4 Bryce Bessell, 5 Trent Howe, 6 Sam Walker, 7 Patrick Nash, 8 Laurence Hebbard, 9 Matthew Muscat, 10 Johnny Bugeja, 11 Terry Delbridge, 12 Andrew Sidford, 13 Jack Attrill, 14 Jason Passlow, 15 Jyh Stubing, 16 Jarrad Crabb.

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Emmery plans to fight

Originally published: Wednesday, 4th August, 2010

His stay may have been brief but Labor candidate Christian Emmery has thrown down the challenge to other Farrer hopefuls with his visit to the region.

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TAFE exhibts tribute to the past

Originally published: Wednesday, 4th August, 2010

The local TAFE's new Exhibition Centre pays tribute to the city's old museum with a selection of displays formerly held at the Technical College.

The new Exhibition Centre, opened this week in the main foyer of the TAFE building, has a number of displays which the TAFE has gone to great lengths to secure.
Having been a museum and art gallery for most of its early days, the TAFE building has reopened the foyer as an area for displaying exhibits old and new.
A model train which was hand-made by mechanical engineer and inventor, Sir George Julius, is back on show after being held in storage at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney.
The locomotive was donated to the city's museum by Sir George's son in 1954. The model was sent for display at the Broken Hill Branch Museum of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences in late 1959.
TAFE Area Manager in the city, Scott Dennis, said he had contacted the Powerhouse Museum to see if the model was still in storage and then made a formal submission to show it at the local TAFE.
The model locomotive is on loan for two years and Mr Dennis hopes the TAFE will be able to keep it beyond that time.
"If the TAFE can maintain it ... hopefully it will be an ongoing loan with approval by the Powerhouse Museum," Mr Dennis said.
The new Exhibition centre also has stuffed birds that had been donated to the museum by the Barrier Field Naturalists Club in 1932.
They had been in storage since the sudden closure of the museum and Mr Dennis was eager to find out how to properly store and protect them.
Minerals also have been loaned to the exhibition by the Albert Kersten Mining and Minerals Museum and a paintings from the Regional Art Gallery are also on loan along with portraits by former local painter Brian Martin.
Mr Dennis said the exhibition was open to all members of the public.

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Don't put history in the bin

Originally published: Wednesday, 4th August, 2010

Locals are being asked to think about what rubbish they throw out, because it could be a part of the city's history.

Neville Bent, from Bent and Bennetts, is worried people are disposing of old photos and relics that may be valuable.
Mr Bent was helping to clean out an estate last week when he saw a box of old photos and post cards that were about to be ditched.
He asked he if could have the box which contained about 100 photos.
One of them was of the grave of a local man, Charlie Day, who fought as a sapper in World War I.
Mr Bent tried to find relations of Mr Day and found Richard Day who was related to the digger.
After informing Mr Day about the photos, Mr Bent gave the rest of the photos to the Broken Hill Family History Group in the Trades Hall so they could be put on display.
"Before you throw them out, bring them into me (at Bent and Bennetts) and I will pass them on," said Mr Bent.
"History is being thrown out. We're seeing too much of it."
Mr Day also asked that people write names of their relations on the back of photographs to help with identification.
"The main thing is to save things (like old photos, postcards, letters)," Mr Bent said.


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An extreme challenge

Originally published: Tuesday, 3rd August, 2010

Broken Hill will be home to a brand new 4x4 off road competition run by two local charities.

The ARB Australian Outback 4x4 Extreme challenge is to be held in May next year, and organisers hope that it will be the country's best 4x4 event and attract the best local and international competitors.
The event is being run by Rotary and Legacy and all money raised will be put back into the community.
Organiser Alan Thys said he came up with the idea along with Jason Gould, and approached the organisations with a proposal.
"We only ever wanted a local event," Mr Thys said.
The challenge runs from the 7th to the 13th of May next year, only a couple of weeks before the long-standing 4x4 Outback Challenge.
The Challenge has had one of its major sponsors pull out to support the new competition.
Mr Thys said there was a two-week break between the two, and competitors had the chance to compete in both.
"Currently we have a number of competitors that have already paid their registration fees."
"Thirty teams registered their interest prior to the formal nominations."
Mr Thys said the aim was to make it more accessable to locals, whilst providing a boost to local businesses such as mechanics.
The track will be located 100 to 150kms from Broken Hill to make it easier for competitors and spectators to attend, he said.
Mr Thys said that a number of property owners had expressed interest in having the event held on their land, but they were still in the "final formality stages."
Competitors will be based at a central camp close to the city, and spectators can also use the base for accommodation.
Mr Thys said organisers were looking for local volunteers to give ground assistance and help with marshalling.
"The more volunteers we get on board the better."
Anyone interesting in competing or volunteering can visit the competition's official website at www.aus4x4extreme.com.au or contact Kevin on 0438 814 969.

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Trent sails over his fifth record

Originally published: Tuesday, 3rd August, 2010

A local student has broken five records in the four years he has been participating in high jump.

Trent Barraclough, a student at Willyama High School, has been high jumping since he was 10, breaking four school records as well as a long standing city record.
Trent swapped approach sides after he found he wasn't jumping all that well, and on the first try on his left, he broke a school record.
The 13 year old also broke a long standing Junior Boys Broken Hill record in 2007, a record that had been previously held for 34 years.
The most recent record he's broken was at the Willyama Athletics Carnival this year, by jumping 1.5 metres.
Trent said he was "pretty happy," with his achievements in the field event and he's hoping to continue on with the sport, but said he wouldn't pursue it at an elite level.
"I play footy mostly; I just do it for fun and just having a go at it," he said.

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Continence Awarness Week

Originally published: Tuesday, 3rd August, 2010

Incontinence is one of the biggest health issues with all ages and the hospital is helping to raise awareness with a new display.

Continence Awareness Week runs from August 1 to 7 and the hospital is working to help educate people on healthy bowel habits.
This week is all about "making people aware" of incontinence and how to seek treatment.
Incontinence is the loss of control over bladder or bowel functions. It affects nearly four million Australians of all ages and for a variety of reasons.
Nurse Manager of Ambulatory Care and Continence Adviser, Heather Clarke, said if  someone was suffering from things such as constipation, straining, haemorrhoids or diarrhoea they should to seek medical attention because these signs could indicate an underlying problem.
It was also important to observe a good diet, drink enough water and be aware of any changes.
Even though incontinence may be embarrassing to discuss it is always important to talk to your doctor about any problems that may arise.
"Always check with your GP ... it's important not to be embarrassed," she said.
"It can be an embarrassing topic, but it's an important topic."
Mrs Clarke is encouraging all locals to visit the hospital and look at the information available.
"People are more than welcome to come and grab some information."
Information will be available at the hospital all week. From more information visit www.continence.org.au or www.bladderbowel.gov.au.


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Visiting the Flying Doctor

Originally published: Tuesday, 3rd August, 2010

Senior executives of Hawker Beechcraft touched down in the city yesterday for a tour of the local Royal Flying Doctor Service facilities.

Hawker Beechcraft supplies a number aircraft to the RFDS and the trip gave the visiting party the opportunity to see how they are used.
The company's Chief Executive Officer, Alan Smith, said it was also a chance to see how the base works.
"(Hawker Pacific) wanted to show Beechcraft what the RFDS is about," Mr Smith said.
The chairman and CEO of Beechcraft Corporation, Shawn Vick, said the RFDS were valuable customers.
"The RFDS are long standing customers and have bought numerous aeroplanes," Mr Vick said.
This was Mr Vick's first visit to the city and he was impressed by the local base.
He said it was clear the service was staffed by dedicated professionals.
"The aeroplanes provide a great solution for the needs (of the RFDS)."
Hawker Beechcraft supplied four KingAir 200 aeroplanes to the local base and a total of 34 across Australia.
"The aeroplanes are capable of flying to distant locations, landing on dirt runaways," Mr Vick said.
"They have large doors capable of loading stretchers as well as an on board ambulance kit ... the KingAir 200 is very robust, highly reliable, easy to maintain and fly.
"It is a privilege to be apart of this organisation, which is demanding and challenging but (also) rewarding."

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TAFE celebrates technology, heritage

Originally published: Monday, 2nd August, 2010

The local TAFE campus is going back to its roots this week as it celebrates the opening of the 'Learning Commons' and Education Week.

The Learning Commons is a flexible, social area aimed at supporting learning outside of the classroom.
It aims to suit the needs of today's students, who are just as likely to take a laptop out into the sunshine as they are to sit in a classroom.
The Commons involves opening up the building's central library into a more social area.
A connected classroom has also been set up using new technology to allow students to talk with their teachers and peers wherever they are in the world.
Wireless internet and the conversion of administration areas into breakout rooms also play a part.
The TAFE building is more than 100 years old and was a museum and art gallery for most of its early days.
Scott Dennis, TAFE Area Manager in the city, said the launch of the Learning Commons presented a good opportunity to recognise this heritage value.
He said tourists often came in to the centrally-located building, following the "museum" sign that remains out the front.
TAFE has set up partnerships with the Powerhouse Museum, BH Regional Art Gallery, Geocentre and City Council to secure exhibits both new and old.
Portraits by Brian Martin are on show in the library, and will remain for six months.
A model train and stuffed birds are back on display after years in storage.
Mr Dennis plans to keep exhibits on show permanently, and bring the building back to its exhibition roots.
The project will be officially opened tonight by the Deputy Director General of Education, Pam Christie.
A joint exhibition of works by TAFE and high school students will also be on show.
Music and dance performances will be provided by young people from Broken Hill and Menindee, and the event will be transmitted to distant viewers using the facility's new technology.
Everyone is invited to look at the building's new facilities this week.

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Voters stirring in Liberal stronghold

Originally published: Monday, 2nd August, 2010

Last week BDT sampled the opinions of voters in South Broken Hill, where the Alma School booth at the last election recorded Farrer's strongest Labor vote. Today, with the help of Albury's Border Mail, we look at the feelings at the other end of the scale - in Pleasant Hills.

Welcome to Liberal heartland in the seat of Farrer.

In the safest of safest seats, Pleasant Hills, a village about 80km north of Albury with a population 39, is a shoe-in for sitting member Sussan Ley.
At the last election three years ago, 128 voters turned out at the Pleasant Hills polling booth and 120 or 93.75 per cent went the way of Liberal.
Labor picked up eight votes (6.25 per cent) and with results like those sightings of politicians in Pleasant Hills are as rare as good cropping seasons in recent years.
Not a lot has changed at Pleasant Hills since the last poll when John Howard was dumped as prime minister and Australians fell in love with Kevin07 only for his party to fall out of love with him before an election was called on August 21.
The pub, which became the first of its kind granted a community licence in 2000 is still opening its doors on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and when the local darts team needs a venue to compete in the Morven and District association.
A minor controversy at the primary school (population 13) about how nearly $80,000 could be soaked up on design, field data and site management in a $250,000 grant under the government's stimulus package has blown over.
But, despite growing optimism recent rains will deliver a long overdue bumper crop for farmers, the locals don't want to be taken for granted on polling day.
They haven't forgotten Ms Ley's decision to back a deregulated wheat market two years ago, but she did earn some brownie points for going into the lion's den and meeting face-to-face angry farmers at nearby Osborne to explain her position.
"It was one of first pieces of legislation passed when Labor came to power and the Liberals nearly fell over each other crossing the floor," farmer Corey Beckett said.
"She came out to listen to them, but that was about all.
"I certainly won't be voting for Ms Ley and we feel a bit like Mr Rudd with the knife in the back."
Mr Beckett welcomed the decision by nearby Yerong Creek farmer James Male to stand at the election without declaring his hand.
"The Male family has been in the district for a couple of generations now," he said.
Cathy Terlich and Allayne Newton were working in the post office/general store on Friday and won't be swayed by gender with Julia Gillard aiming to remain the first female prime minister of the country.
"Because she is a woman I wouldn't necessarily vote for her," Mrs Terlich said.
"Her policies are what are important and gender of the person in power makes no difference to me.
"I definitely won't be voting Labor and if the independent (Mr Male) comes up with some good ideas I am willing to lean that way."
Asked whether a good season or a change of government was his preference, farmer Randyn Fischer said: "Both.
"I am not saying the Howard Government was perfect, but he got us out of debt and had a bit of surplus and these (expletive deleted) are spending it all.
"We are the ones who are going to be paying for it or our kids."
Predictably Labor voters were thin on the ground in Pleasant Hills yesterday and one resident of the town told The Border Mail in no uncertain terms what he thought of the looming election.
"I don't vote. (Expletive deleted) off," he said.



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Doctors supporters spread word online

Originally published: Monday, 2nd August, 2010

Former local doctor Phillip Chapman, who resigned after his suspension from the medical register, has had a support page created on the social networking site Facebook.

The page, titled "We support Dr Phillip Chapman!!", has 93 members, most sharing fond memories and showing their support for the former doctor.
"The suspension of Dr Chapman was the last straw and forced him into retirement, a situation that should never have happened," says the page's moderator.
"His retirement will place further strain on the severe doctor shortage in Broken Hill, and for some his absence will be a gap that will be unable to be filled."
Members have posted comments about how he delivered their children, and his caring attitude towards patients.
"The visit was not timed and ran its course. We spoke, he listened, not entering every word on a computer and giving the impression he was dependent on the screen for answers," one member writes.
The moderator has also posted Readers Write letters from the BDT on the site as a show of support.

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Taste of victory

Originally published: Monday, 2nd August, 2010


How sweet it was, the taste of victory.
The CFMEU-inspired Broken Hill combined side handed out a football lesson to the previously undefeated Woomera Districts side at AAMI Stadium on Saturday to the tune of 76 points.
After trailing at the first change Broken Hill kicked 17.11 to Woomera's 4.7 in a powerhouse display of hard running football combined with a fierce attack at the ball, or an opponent with the ball. The opposition just had no answer for the skill and pace of the Broken Hill players.
In pretty good conditions Woomera won the toss and elected to kick to the airport end of the ground with a two-to-three goal breeze at their backs. Woomera started the better with good use of the footy and cleaner hands. It didn't take long for their giant at centre half forward Dylan Webb to impose himself on the contest, kicking Woomera's first. After some sloppy ball handling and poor disposal lead to numerous turnovers, Broken Hill finally found their feet. When Jayden Kelly goaled from fifty the margin was only 1 point. At that stage Woomera still had players prepared to run a little harder and create space for teammates and they were rewarded when they stole a mini-break with goals to Scott Peek and Scott Montgomery to lead by 15 points. Broken Hill again rallied and after a series of behinds Ben Perkins kicked a beauty from the boundary line to reduce the lead to just 6 points at the first change. It was an interesting opening term with the Woomera side looking the more likely to take control at any stage.

Woomera 3.3=21 Broken Hill 2.3=15

The second term was Broken Hill's first opportunity with the breeze and a lot would depend on their use of the footy. It could not have started any better with Wade Gepp leveling the scores early in the term. Broken Hill was starting to gain control in the middle with Kelly, Heath, Wilmore and Howard all getting first use of the footy from the efforts of Matt Nelson. The ball was continually going to Keenan and Perkins inside the forward fifty and after four behinds it took a great goal from Thomas Derham from the dead pocket to give Broken Hill a 9 point lead. That was extended on when Gepp kicked his second and the margin was a handy 15 points. Woomera were not lying down just yet and after some lead-up play Justin Watson reduced the margin back to 9 points. Broken Hill could sense the turning tide and when Lindon Cox kicked a great crumbing goal the margin was again 15. Broken Hill would have been disappointed with the remaining couple of minutes as they allowed Woomera an easy goal through Webb and the difference going into the long break was 9 points. It was a very good term for Broken Hill with Ben Camilleri, Matt Dempster and Chad Ryan all playing well and giving nothing away in defense, while McInnes, Derham, Kelly and O'Brien were all having good games.

Broken Hill 6.8=44 Woomera 5.5=35

The third term is always the most important - the premiership quarter - and it was no different in this contest. Both sides needed to produce in this term, Woomera with the breeze and Broken Hill against. The term started with Broken Hill coach David Ruddock putting Gepp into the ruck and the move had immediate success with Gepp dominating the duels. He gave his midfielders easy access to the footy and their good work was finished off by Kelly and Jamie Keenan in the early stages of the term and all of a sudden the Broken Hill lead was out to 21 points. The AAMI Stadium crowd rose as one when the 'X Factor' Wade Gepp took a screamer and goaled to extend the lead to 28 points. Against the growing momentum Woomera managed a goal when Peek kicked his second, but it was only a minor speed hump as Broken Hill continued to dominate the contest. Ryan found himself down forward and he took full advantage, kicking a super goal to take the margin back to 28 points. With Broken Hill dominating in most positions on the field it seemed inevitable that they would break the hearts of the Woomera players and they did just that in a five minute burst with goals to Heath Caldwell, Justin Heath and Dylan Stuart racing to a 47 point lead. Woomera to their credit kicked a consolation goal late in the term but the damage had been done by a skilful and quick Broken Hill side.

Broken Hill 13.11=89 Woomera 7.6=48

The final term commenced with Broken Hill full of run as they could sense a big win on the cards. When Derham kicked his second and another beauty to extend the lead to 48 points you could sense the white flag being unfolded. Jackson McInnes, who had started in defense, was now up forward and his two goals on the trot had the champagne corks popping as the margin had hit 60 points. With the contest all over Broken Hill was allowed to just run amock and they did with great enjoyment. Brad Mannion, Cox and Caldwell all kicked goals to take the final margin to 76 points. While the midfielders and forwards had a field day the defenders were fantastic, continually repelling the Woomera forward moves and setting attacks from defense. In a game that Broken Hill needed to win and to win so comprehensively it is a credit to the committed players who wore the blue and gold and coach David Ruddock who made them believe.


Best Players
Broken Hill = B. Camilleri, C. Ryan, W. Gepp, J. Kelly, M. Dempster, C. Howard
                       J. Heath
Woomera = B. Cooper, P. Rhodes, S.Peek, L. Scoble, C. Kenny N.Tuthill

Goalkickers
Broken Hill = W. Gepp 3, J. McInnes 2, T. Derham 2, L. Cox 2, J. Kelly 2, H. Caldwell 2, B. Mannion 1, D. Stuart 1, J. Heath 1, C. Ryan 1, J. Keenan 1, B. Perkins 1
Woomera = D.Webb 2, S. Peek 2, S.Montgomery 1, J. Watson 1, P. Rhodes 1.


Broken Hill 19.14=128
Woomera = 7.10=52

Woomera Trophy = J. Ruddock
Broken Hill Trophy = B. Cooper

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