All Broken Hill articles

League back with a bang

Tuesday, 14th May, 2013

The Outback Rugby League season started in the district last weekend and was deemed a success by its president, Dave Gallagher.
“I think the popularity is rising, it showed through a fairly good crowd at every location,” Mr Gallagher said.
The Geebungs went up against the Saints only to draw 24 points each.
Kerry King, Jeffrey Webster, Rickie Whyman and Clint Squire each scored a try for the Geebungs. Willy Webster scored three goals and Robert Young scored one goal.
For the Saints, Mitch McKenny and Matt Kiddle had two tries a piece.
Matt Kiddle then followed up with another two goals with Ash Tucker also scoring two goals.
The Menindee Wedge-Tail Eagles proved too good for the Parntu Warriors winning 56 to 28.
Menindee tries went to Daryl Morris (2), Colin Clark (2), Clint Ferguson, Jason Johnson, Shaun Kemp, Lawrence Philp, Ricky Waters and Cameron Philp.
Curtis Smith went above and beyond with seven goals and one goal went to Daryl Morris.
Colin Whyman, Moe Hokai, Brady Hall, Darren Whyman and Barry Hunter scored tries for the Parntu Warriors and Colin Whyman scored four goals.
The last game was the Wilcannia Boomerangs against the Menindee Yabbies. Wilcannia Boomerangs came away with the win, scoring 54 to 18.
“I think it is excellent, every part of the Broken Hill region, including Menindee and Wilcannia offered a game of rugby,” Mr Gallagher said.
“It goes back to the days when they had it regularly.”
Mr Gallagher said he was impressed by the number of players.
“There were enough to field six sides, it was also good for the juniors,” he said.
“We could tell the crowd enjoyed the greatest game of all.”
Mr Gallagher said he hoped the support would continue into the season.

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Recruiters eye Giants

Tuesday, 14th May, 2013

The Slater and Gordon Under 15 GWS Academy team. The Slater and Gordon Under 15 GWS Academy team.

By Darrin Manuel

Broken Hill’s best under 15 footballers have had a glimpse at top level football during trial games against SANFL club Central Districts.
The Slater and Gordon Under 15 GWS Academy team took on the Bulldogs’ juniors in two games recently, and learned a great deal despite not registering a win.
GWS Academy coach, Dale Tonkin, said his team had shown great improvement between the two outings.
“In the first game we showcased our talent, but our work rate and effort wasn’t quite up to standard,” he said.
“We came back, we regrouped and had feedback as a team and as individuals, and this time we were super competitive.
“Most of the players got to the level required based on work ethic, and we played some really good football.”
Tonkin said by the second game many of the players had started to grasp the fundamentals required for play in higher calibre leagues.
“A lot of the kids started to understand the tools and skill-set you need to compete when you don’t have the football.
“I anticipate that most of the kids learned from the experience and it was good to see them extend themselves and understand what’s required at this higher level.
“Things like running both ways, forwards rolling up the ground, defenders becoming attacking players and midfielders working hard on spreading from the contest.
“From that game I’m sure we’ll see quite a few of our kids competing at the Combined High Schools Carnival in a few weeks, and hopefully Broken Hill will have multiple State representatives.”
The local players also fell under the eye of GWS recruiter Neville Stibbard, who travelled from Sydney to watch the games.
“I came down from Sydney to have a look, most of the boys I knew and they are developing pretty well,” he said.
“The pathway for them now is to play in these type of carnivals to come under notice ahead of the draft in three years’ time.
“It gives them very good exposure to AFL recruiters and... there’s five or six players there that we will certainly monitor really closely.”
Mr Tonkin said he wished to thank the Picton Oval Committee, Central Districts, Heath Caldwell (assistant coach), Jarrad Ruddock (runner) and all the players’ parents for making the trip possible.

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Vandal attack ‘atrocious’

Tuesday, 14th May, 2013

Graffiti aimed at the Mayor. Graffiti aimed at the Mayor.

By Erica Visser

Information bays on the outskirts of the city were graffitied overnight Sunday with spray-painted obscenities aimed at City Council.
The signs on the Adelaide, Mildura and Sydney roads were all covered in white spray paint and in one case, a nearby bin also copped it.
Council employees removed what they could yesterday, however the signs would require repainting.
The estimated cost of the damage was $5000, which Council would be forced to fork out.
Broken Hill Mayor Wincen Cuy said that anti-social behaviour in relation to Council had “reared its ugly head” over the past week.
“I just think it’s atrocious, people can have opinions and dislike people but to deface something like our tourism welcome signs is absolutely atrocious,” Mayor Cuy said.
“People are protesting probably a wastage of money and all those types of issues so it’s absolutely ludicrous that they do these things which cost thousands of dollars to repair.
“This mentality seems to have reared its ugly head over the last week or so.
“This outward abuse and vandalism has materialised recently.”
Mayor Cuy challenged anyone who had an issue with him to take it up directly.
“I just really encourage people to have some courage to come up and speak to me first,” he said.
“If they want to have a conversation with me in the correct environment I’m only too happy, my door is open.”

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Burton bids farewell

Tuesday, 14th May, 2013

Steve Burton is on the move after more than 10 years in the city. PICTURE: Gavin Schmidt Steve Burton is on the move after more than 10 years in the city. PICTURE: Gavin Schmidt

By Kurtis J Eichler

Health advocate Steve Burton is leaving Broken Hill with “mixed feelings”.
The chairman of Active BH and BH Hospital employee has accepted the job of Regional Health Promoter in Albury with the Murrumbidgee Health District.
The district covers one fifth of NSW and includes 14 health facilities - six more than Broken Hill.
Moving to the city with wife Jackie van der Neut in 2002, Mr Burton founded Active BH Inc to promote the city’s many sporting groups.
His passion for the community has stretched further than just physical activity. He’s been a member of the Y’s Men’s Club and could be seen at everything from rodeos to country music festivals in the village of Cockburn.  
“I’ve got very mixed feelings,” Mr Burton told the BDT. “I think Broken Hill is an amazing place.
“In my time here ... I think there’s been an increase in the popularity of sport and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.
“The biggest achievement was probably building a database that in time has given free promotion for every sporting, physical education and activity group in Broken Hill.
“It’s slowed the decline in a lot of those groups.”
With the founder of the health advocacy group leaving the city, questions will be raised about its ability to survive but Mr Burton said sustainability was the key.
“The holy grail with this type of work is sustainability.
“Sustainability is a difficult thing to find.”
Mr Burton has outlined a business plan for BH Active BH for the next 12 months and says he hopes to see a shopfront in Argent Street within 10 years.
“If it doesn’t survive that’s three years and lots of money that’s gone down the drain,” he said.
For now, though, he is looking forward to visiting the gourmet areas around Albury as well as doing some skiing at the Falls Creek snowfields.

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Reg restores piece of Aussie history

Tuesday, 14th May, 2013

Reg Pedergnana with his two fully restored Australian outboard motors, the Verity and Hurricane.PICTURE: Emily Roberts Reg Pedergnana with his two fully restored Australian outboard motors, the Verity and Hurricane.PICTURE: Emily Roberts

By Andrew Robertson

A pristine example of post-war Australian ingenuity is about to go on display before its Broken Hill owner gifts it to the Maritime Museum.
Hebbard Street retiree Reg Pedergnana has spent hundreds of dollars and countless hours restoring his latest project - a “Verity” outboard motor.
As Australia’s first offering from what turned out to be a prolific but short-lived outboard motor industry, the Verity’s place in maritime history is assured.
But not much is known about the little motor which was manufactured by Sydney company AV Sale in 1947 using aluminium left in Australia by the American military after the Second World War.
That made restorer and historian Reg’s task of rescuing his Verity - which was given to him by old friend Alan Elder - all the more difficult.
“When Alan delivered it to me, he had removed every bolt, nut, washer, gasket and piston to the extent I had to get a wheelbarrow to bring the dismantled motor into my workshop,” Reg said.
“We’ve got very little history on Australian outboard industry, it was a very short-lived industry.
“Having no drawings or manuals to work from, it was like putting a jigsaw puzzle together.”
The internet was no help and when he lodged a request on the Old Machinery Magazine Forum, Reg received two replies from other Verity owners - who wanted his help.
Months spent restoring and piecing back the motor followed for Reg, who hasn’t let a lack of technical knowledge stop him from restoring a number of outboards and stationary motors over the years.
But the Verity is undoubtedly the jewel in his collection.
“Australia did not have an outboard motor until the end of World War Two,” explained Reg, who believes his Verity, number 273, is likely the best example in Australia.
Reg said he couldn’t put a monetary value on the motor which he plans to show - along with another Aussie outboard he has restored, the “Hurricane” - at Wentworth’s Junction Rally in July.
He’s a regular to the rally which is held every three years and features stationary motors, restored trucks, tractors, motorcycles and vintage cars, among other old machines.
But Broken Hill will eventually lose the unique piece of maritime machinery with Reg deciding to donate his Verity to the Australian Maritime Museum at Darling Harbour in Sydney.
“I believe this motor should not remain in a private collection, as it belongs to the people of Australia, it is our history.”

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