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News archive

This is an archive containing every news story ever posted on the BDT website. If you’re looking for a specific article, try the search box at the top right hand side of this page. Otherwise you can just browse the archive by selecting a year and month below.

May, 2010

Tips from a world champion

Originally published: Monday, 31st May, 2010

Local clay target shooter, Darryn Nicholls visited Burke Ward Primary School recently to talk about his return home from South Africa where he was crowned world champion.

The BH Gun Club member spoke to a number of Year 5 and 6 students about the World Down the Line Championships in Cape Town.
The students are currently learning about Australian identities and significant Australians throughout history, and Mr Nicholls is a seen as a significant Australian.
Lindy Robins, the teacher of 6R, thought it was a great idea to have Mr Nicholls speak to the class; especially since his children attend Burke Ward.
Mrs Robins said when Mr Nicholls went overseas to compete, his twin son and daughter; Jarred and Hannah, would discuss how the trip was going.
"The whole class was getting excited... I thought it would be great to get him in," she said.
"It made it all the more special that he was a world champion from Broken Hill."
Mrs Robins said it was something the children could aspire to.
She said Mr Nicholls was very unassuming and he was teaching the kids to just follow their dreams.
"He is like our own Jessica Watson," said Mrs Robins.
Mr Nicholls started his overseas campaign with dual gold medals in the separate South African Grand competition, taking out the double barrel and single barrel categories.
He competed against shooters from countries including England, Ireland and Germany.
Mr Nicholls made sure to show his trophy and medals to the students as well as answering their questions.

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Outback Trek revs up for the 21st anniversary

Originally published: Monday, 31st May, 2010

Outback Car Trek celebrates 21 years and $15 million for the Flying Doctor.

The annual Royal Flying Doctor Service fundraiser, the Outback Car Trek, will celebrate its 21st anniversary in 2010, with more than 300 participants driving from Hay to Hamilton Island, via Broken Hill.

The Trek, which has raised more than $15 million for the Flying Doctor since its inception in 1990, starts in Hay in south-western NSW on Sunday, June 6.
The theme for this year's event is old friends, but there is a new face at the helm with Bill Patrick preparing for his first year as event organiser.
"The Outback Trek has established itself as the major fundraiser for the Flying Doctor, and I am delighted to see it come of age," Bill said.
"Each year, participants in the Trek take their much-loved pre-1971 cars across almost 4,000km of the most rugged and remote terrain in Australia - all in the name of charity.
This year the goal is to raise $1 million more. The funds raised go to the RFDS to help them deliver emergency aeromedical and essential health care to communities in rural, regional and remote Australia.
"And although we love fundraising for the Flying Doctor, we just hope we don't have to call for their assistance at any time during the Trek!" Bill said.
Participants in the 2010 Trek will travel through Broken Hill, Copley in northern South Australia and Birdsville, Stonehenge, Barcaldine and Ravenswood in Queensland before arriving at their final destination of Hamilton Island on Saturday, June 12, averaging 530km per day.
A feature of this year's Trek will be navigating the flood affected regions of north western NSW and southern Queensland.
"For the most part, the Trek is synonymous with dirt, dust and dry conditions. This year will be a very welcome change; we might even get our feet wet," Bill said.
"But whatever the conditions, we'll be on the road, 'doing it for the doctor'.
"While we're only in the outback for seven days, the Flying Doctor is out there 24 hours, seven days a week.
"The communities we'll be visiting rely on the medical services provided by the Flying Doctor, and that's why the Trek is so important; we're helping the RFDS take the care to where it's needed the most," Bill said.
To keep up to date with the Trek as it progresses or to make a donation, visit www.outbackcartrek.com.au or www.flyingdoctor.org.au.

* The "glorious" Rocky Bull, a 1968 Chevvy Impala - one of many colourful entries in the Outback Car Trek in its 20 years.

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Pub culture sadly missed

Originally published: Monday, 31st May, 2010

I have received several prompts to write this article - Brother Brian Anderson, a bus driver, and most recently the daughter of Prof. Stanley Livingston (of inorganic chemistry fame, adjunct to the W.S. and L.B. Robinson University College) and former wife of Jules DeBrenni Junior, who during a visit to the Labor Doyen at the War Vets Home stated she was a teacher at Railwaytown School (1967/68), that she "did not drink before coming to Broken Hill, and hasn't since she left".
I arrived in Broken Hill in February 1969 care of the Forbes Mail and the five-car Silver City Comet. It was suggested that I should visit the Pig and Whistle Hotel, home of the local teachers, all of whom were under the strict control of 'Nana' Norah Forde, publican and triple certificated nurse. I discovered a pub culture that had reached extinction in Sydney and elsewhere long before.
The 'pub' was especially 'home' to many old High School teachers, the Saints Football Club was based there, as were union activities. It boasted quoits and darts nights, Saturday was crib day. Friday nights were special, the odd guitar (the late K.C. Dodd) would emerge, there was no need for 'entertainment' licences, uniformed police visits did not happen (if police were there they were our friends, off duty), sniffer dogs were unheard of.
Of course the Pig and Whistle Hotel was far from the only pub patronised by teachers; every second week (pay was then by cheque) on Friday over 200 teachers would descend on Argent Street to do whatever with the cheques, and then gather in the vast rear bar of the Exchange Hotel where the feared Infants' Mistresses would zealously guard their brood, just as Matron Wade then guarded her trainee nurses.
The young and otherwise would then retreat to the 'Pig', many were younger than I (I was 25, and had been too old for the Vietnam Barrel of Death) and had had numbers of their peer group conscripted; the music of the day was very much Woodstock style peace songs - with of course Australian ballads thrown in.
Other pubs frequented by teachers included during the week the Junction where the North School held sway, and the Rising Sun, where "Molly" (Mary) Crosby kept order, and where the union held in the dining room its first executive meeting each year.
Other sections of the public service had their pubs, the police (the United Services Football Club) held sway at the Musos, and had the Freemasons Hotel painted red and white in their Club colours, the Geebungs Football Club (bankers and mine engineers) had the Silver King and the Southern Cross.
That the pub culture of Broken Hill was a steadying force on Broken Hill's social mores is beyond question - pubs such as the Pig were marriage factories (I can think of three teachers in one year). We as a community did not lock back doors, there was no breathaliser and surprisingly few accidents. Keys were left in ignition locks for safe keeping.
Was it always thus?
The short answer is no - for most of Broken Hill's existence there were no beer gardens, and women in bars was not on. Pubs were very much a working man's retreat, and a focus for sport (Sunday football, quoits, darts, euchre; a number had billiard tables next door) and S.P. betting on Saturdays.
Mining began in 1885 with two pubs. By 1888 that number had become 50 with a further eight in the 10 mile (Sunday drinking limit).
The number peaked in 1892 with 63, with another seven in the 10 mile limit. In 1923 the numbers were 59 and five. In 1924 however 18 city hotels were delicensed by the State Government.
Women in hotels were accommodated in parlours; the Labor Doyen recalls living with his parents at the Cable Hotel, made famous on New Year's day 1915 when bullets from Turk Rocks (named much later 'White Rocks') fired by two 'Afghans' were flying around it - it was on the southern corner of Oxide and Brown, a house now occupies the site. When I first saw it the corner door contained bullet holes which long ago had been puttied up.
Max Stewart describes the pub as having a front bar on Oxide Street with a cross hall and two large rooms behind it, a 'parlour' (also on Oxide Street linked to the bar with a slide or 'hatch'. A central hall went through to the rear with accommodation rooms to the left. There was a slide in the Pig and Whistle, a remnant from earlier days, other 'slides' no doubt existed.
In 1969 there were three early (6am) openers in the city, on Fridays the Sydney Club ceased serving at 4am with all out by 5am.
Sunday trading then was of course illegal, which meant that if you wanted to take a bottle (stubbies were yet to be invented) or beer with you, you took it out the side door in a brown paper bag. At the Pig, as with most of the then hotels, there was only two beers on tap, West End and Southwark. Cans were steel, requiring a triangular tool to open them. I had a Wolfram Street neighbour who took his kids to Sunday School, and then went to his pub, picking the kids up on the way home.
In 1969, keg beer outsold packaged beer 4 to 1, not all kegs however were consumed in pubs and clubs. In the early 70's Pud Tonkin (Junction Hotel) had over 30 'Puddies Goodies' (keg, tap, gas bottle) kits available for hire for 'private' functions.
Again in 1969, the per capita consumption of beer in Broken Hill was four times the S.A. State average.
Today, much has changed. Beer prices are no longer controlled by the BIC (I recall having to drink in the clubs for a week before the publicans agreed to bring their prices back down) with the result that packaged liquor is far cheaper than keg beer, and now outsells it.
Consider: Last week a popular beer at the Desert Oasis sold at $1.30 a can, the same beer was $4.80 a schooner at my regular pub.
In 1969 young people went for a drink, especially on Fridays, after knock-off and perhaps a change of clothes. Now they venture out much later, after apparently warming up on packaged product. Clearly, the practice of regular visits by uniformed police to our hotels is counter productive. It most assuredly has damaged community relations.
Similar with the so-called 'Liquor Accord'; elected people properly are those who should make the laws, and interpret them. Enough. What has occurred is vexacious; our young citizens can only listen and envy 'what was'.
Footnotes:
1) In 1969 our pubs had no legal poker machines, and no objectionable noisy video machines.
2) Popular Willyama High School teacher Brian McCarthy has retired from teaching, and is leaving Broken Hill for the Central Coast. Brian arrived in Broken Hill in 1975, one year after Willyama was opened. He has been a tower of strength in the Saints Football Club and has served two terms as president of the Broken Hill Lions Service Club. Broken Hill will be much the poorer without him.
THE PUBS
In February 1969 there were 36 hotels in Broken Hill, with a further three in the 10 mile limit (Rockwell, Mt Gipps, Stephens Creek) and a further four in the Broken Hill district (Border Gate, Quondong, Yanco Glen, Topar), and 11 licenced clubs.
The city hotels were: The All Nations; The Alma; The Baylyn; The Caledonian X; The Centennial X; The Astra X; The Crown X; The Duke Of Cornwall X; The Excelsior, Theatre Royal; The Federal (now Black Lion); The Freemasons (now West Darling); The Gasworks X; The Hillside X; Hotel Northern; The Imperial X; The Junction; Mario's X; The Mulga Hill; The Newmarket X; The Palace; The Pig And Whistle X; The Rising Sun; The Royal; The Royal Exchange X; The Silver King X; The Criterion (now Silver Spade); The South Australian; The Southern Cross; The Sportsman Arms (the 'Farm') X; The Sydney Club (became the Daydream) X; The Merthyr Tydvil ('Tydvil'); The Union Club X ; The Victorian X; The Wilcannia Club X; The Willyama.
Since 1969, 18 of these hotels (those marked X) have closed; 18 remain open. Five of the 11, 1969 licensed clubs have closed: Alma Sporting (the 'Billies'), Broken Hill, Broken Hill Bowling, Freemasons, RSL.
Acknowlegement: Papers held in the City Archives, K.L. Dansie, 1986.

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South too strong in the wet

Originally published: Monday, 31st May, 2010

South attacked strongly from the start, and the Bulldogs found it hard to counteract the run and tenacity of the young and enthusiastic Roos.
Heath Caldwell and Cody Schorn were power houses for the red and whites, Caldwell especially with many hard ball wins, quick thinking and evasion and excellent disposal.
North's dangerous forward Chris Billings was making position for his centre ball winners in Brett Johnson and Jayden Kelly but South's defence held strong led by Thomas Derham, Marcus O'Brien and his brother Simon.
South kicked five goals in the first quarter, two to Cody Schorn and one each to Heath Caldwell, Mark Purcell, and Jayson Higgins.
It was their abundance of run and direct kicking which troubled the Bulldogs, who were goalless at the first quarter break.
South held a 32-point lead as North tried to lift with Johnson, Schipanski, Henderson and Kelly trying hard to win the ball out of centre.
Heath Caldwell continued to get leather poisoning kicking two goals, and Mackney one.
Chris Billing kicked a 50 metre goal from the scoreboard pocket, North's only goal for the quarter, and they went into the rooms with South holding a 39-point lead.
It was Jayden Kelly, Wes Burton and Brett Johnson keeping North from a further deficit, and one has to mention the efforts of North full back Luke Reynolds. His tenacity and endeavour certainly didn't go unnoticed.
It was catch-up football now for the Bulldogs and they had their backs to the wall.
In the second half North lifted and kicked three quick goals. Kelly, Clare and Henderson were the contributors. Henderson seemed to shake the shackles put on by Degoumois.
Jayden Kelly was the instigator of North's revival but they found it hard to close the gap with South replying with two goals.
The weather continued to trouble the players of both team, as kicking and finding a target were hard to meet.
North kicked a goal through Anthony Henderson, and the dogged Bulldog defence led by Luke Reynolds and Tobias Hack kept South from scoring a goal.
It was South's early lead which North found hard to peg back. Both teams had standout players in Jayden Kelly for North and Heath Caldwell for South. The conditions didn't seem to concern these two skilled players.
Overall it was an entertaining match, fought out in hard conditions, with winter just around the corner; it was maybe a taste of things to come.
As mentioned, South got the jump on North and held it to win by 28 points.
Players to watch in coming years are Kyle Schipanski, Tobias Hack and Kurtis Bevan for North, and Cody Schorn, Riley Elliott and Aiden Pettitt for South.
Scoreboard:
South 5-3 7-6 9-7 9-8 (62)
North 0-1 1-3 4-4 5-4 (34)
Best players:
South - H Caldwell, C Schorn, B Degoumois, D Stephens, S O'Brien, M O'Brien.
North - J Kelly, W Burton, B Johnson, L Reynolds, C Billings.
Goalkickers:
South - H Caldwell 2, C Schorn 2, J Higgins 2, M Purcell, M Mackney, R Elliott.  
North - A. Henderson 2, C Billings, B Clare, J Kelly.   
B Grade:
South 7-14 d North 2-4

* Marc Purcell breaks a tackle in Saturday's game against North.

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Old stories come to life

Originally published: Friday, 28th May, 2010

Dynamique Music and Dance will present a ballet production this weekend at Theatre 44 that is bound to entertain young and old.

The production will feature junior ballet students aged 5 to 12 years old.
There will be two short stories - "Little Red Riding Hood" and "A Child's Dream".
The first is the traditional story of Little Red who is going to visit her grandmother. On the way she meets the cunning wolf and a hunter.
Throughout the journey there are also appearances from forest fairies, animals, and Little Red's friends.
The second story is about a young girl who is tucked into bed by her older sister and whilst asleep, all her toys come to life.
This has harlequin dolls, clowns, jacks in the box, Raggedy Anne dolls and toy soldiers.
The production is a wonderful opportunity for the Dynamique Music and Dance students to experience an enjoyable aspect of ballet through playing various characters, said Le'Neta Edwards, the principal of Dynamique Music and Dance.
She said the children had thoroughly enjoyed the rehearsals.
"It's going to be a lively performance with lots of action, colour and wonderful costumes," she said.
"It really is a production for the whole family as children will love the variety of characters.
"The show will also be a wonderful way of introducing younger children to the wonderful world of ballet."
The performance will be held at Theatre 44 on Saturday at 7pm and Sunday at 2pm.
Tickets are now available from BH Music for $15 and $10 for concession card holders.
Tickets will also be available at the door, although Saturday night's show is almost sold out. Refreshments will be available at interval.

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Celtic kicks in for fundraiser

Originally published: Friday, 28th May, 2010

The Celtic soccer club is one of many local organisations that took part in the fight against cystic fibrosis this week.

Today the president of the club, Margaret Symes, is getting her leg permanently tattooed to raise money for the cause.
"The total cost of my tattoo is $250, and all of that will go into a research fund for cystic fibrosis in Adelaide," Ms Symes said.
The soccer club will also have donation tins for supporters from today until Sunday at the O'Neill Park soccer grounds.
"My family and friends have already said that they are going to contribute, which is great," Ms Symes said.
She will also help the cause by opening her home from 2.30 to 4:30pm today for coffee and cakes.
Like many people getting "inked", Ms Symes has a personal link to the disease.
"We have a nine-year-old boy who has cystic fibrosis at our soccer club, and his parents specifically asked for the money to go to the research facility in Adelaide."

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Water sustainability under investigation

Originally published: Friday, 28th May, 2010

Murdoch University Professor Glenn Albrecht is in Broken
Hill to investigate whether the city’s water supply will remain sustainable.
The University is conducting a research project exploring the
capacity for people to adapt to the impending challenges of climate change and water security.
The project is being
undertaken on behalf
of the National Climate
Change Adaptation
Research Facility.
It is focussed on Broken
Hill and Kalgoorlie - two
of Australia’s largest
inland cities.
Despite being on
opposite sides of the
continent, the cities share
semi-arid environments,
mining histories, similar
populations and limited
water supplies.
Professor Albrecht is
in the city this week to
talk to water suppliers
and stakeholders. He is
accompanied by Neville
Ellis.
Prof Albrecht said he
was examining the city’s
history of engineering
and innovation in its bid
to retain a water supply.
He believes examining
the efforts of the past will
inform the city’s ability to
survive climate change.
On Thursday, June 24,
Prof Albrecht will return
to Broken Hill for a
Community Water Expo.
He will invite residents
to provide their visions of
the future of the city in
light of climate change.
Several options will
be presented, including
a future where climate
remains steady and the
city unchanged; one
where rising temperatures
require more expensive
water delivery solutions
that prices some out of
the city; and a scenario
where heat and water
scarcity have rendered
the city uninhabitable.
Attendees will be asked
to pick which scenario
they think most likely as a
way of gauging the city’s
opinion on the issue.
“We anticipate that
the Water Expo will be a
fantastic opportunity for
the citizens of the region
to come together to
discuss these important
issues and begin the
journey of finding out
about and planning for
their future,” said Prof
Albrecht.
The project is funded
by a Commonwealth
grant and is under a
tight deadline. Prof
Albrecht said the
speed of the exercise
was a symptom of the
Government’s eagerness
to gather solid research.
Murdoch University is
independent.

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World cup tipsters

Originally published: Friday, 28th May, 2010

The Broken Hill Soccer Association will run a fundraising footy tipping competition during the FIFA World Cup
tournament.
The World Cup is being held in South Africa and runs from
June 11 until July 12.
There are 48 group matches followed by the round of 16 finals.
The association hopes the proceeds from the competition will fund a volunteers shed for the city’s four soccer clubs to store
their equipment in.
Entry costs 50 cents per match, making a total of $32. Prizes have been donated by local businesses and include cash, accommodation and fuel vouchers.
The competition will be split into five rounds and there will
be prizes for the best and worst tipster of the round.

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Big fundraiser for church

Originally published: Thursday, 27th May, 2010

The St James Parish Church will hold its annual fete on Saturday.

Pots and pans, books and music, and lots of brick-a-brack will be on sale at the church from 8:30am until 1pm.
Parishioner Pam White says the fete's proceeds will go towards much needed modifications on the church.
"We have just recovered from a white ant infestation, and we also intend to pay for a few more reverse cycle air conditioners," Ms White said.
Fete organiser Graham Howe said that this was the church's main fundraiser for year.
"It's a chance for the community to support the church," he said.
"It's the only surviving church in the South at the moment."
A sausage sizzle, cake stall and a kiddies corner will be just some of the stalls there on Saturday.
The fete and garage sale is on at 143 Wilson Street, opposite Patton St Park.

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Kidney health in the spotlight

Originally published: Thursday, 27th May, 2010

Locals are being urged to check the health of their kidneys and whether they may be at risk of disease.

Kidney Health Week is running this week with the theme, "Are you at risk of Kidney Disease?" which is aimed at increasing the number of people having regular kidney health checks with their GPs.
As part of Kidney Health Week the hospital has an information display in the the foyer.
The display offered blood pressure and blood sugar monitoring, as well as information and advice about kidney health and reducing risk factors.
"We want to promote awareness of kidney disease which can be silent and deadly. You can lose 80 per cent to 90 per cent of kidney function before you start feeling unwell," said Penny Griffin, Clinical Nurse Consultant from Renal Services.
"Common causes or risk factors can be reduced to reduce the severity and progression of kidney disease," she said.
"Early detection has become a vital strategy in intervention in the management of all forms of chronic kidney disease which is growing rapidly."
Fifty people die each day in Australia from kidney related diseases and there are over 18,000 being treated for end stage kidney disease (dialysis or transplantation).
Peter Prime, a private diabetes educator, was on hand to raise diabetes and kidney disease awareness which he believes go "hand-in-hand".
"The leading cause of kidney failure is diabetes," said Mr Prime.
Adults are at risk of chronic kidney disease if they have high blood pressure (hypertension), diabetes, smoke cigarettes, are obese, have a family history of chronic kidney disease, are of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent or are over 50 years old.
For more information call the Kidney Health Australia Help Line on 1800 4543 639 or visit www.kidney.org.au or www.checkmykidneys.com.au.

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The Salvos need your help

Originally published: Thursday, 27th May, 2010

Volunteer collectors are desperately needed for this weekend's Red Shield Appeal.

This year the Salvation Army hopes to raise $9.7 million nationally, but it will only happen if more people volunteer to door knock.
Peter Keenan, the chairman and door knock organiser of the local Red Shield Appeal, said this year things were not looking good.
"Some years I struggle to have volunteers," he said.
"This year I've had two people respond to ads in the paper. We need them now more than ever.
"At the moment I've got 40 areas to cover in Broken Hill and only 13 areas have been covered."
Mr Keenan is hoping the schools will come to the Salvation Army's assistance.
"But there are 27 areas we haven't covered. We need at least another 150 door knockers."
Locals have been taking part in the door knock for more than 20 years.
Last year Mr Keenan said $18,227.40 was raised in the door knock, while in total the city contributed $20,702.25.
"All the money we raise stays in Broken Hill to help run the Salvation Army in town to help with Algate House and its facilities," he said.
"The national appeal then supplements our efforts with up to $50,000 so our local services can run."
The money also helps provide crisis support accommodation, youth support, employment services, addiction recovery and emergency services.
Mr Keenan said collectors would be clearly identified with 2010 identification tags around their necks and would carry receipt books in white plastic bags showing The Salvation Army Shield.
Anyone who can help on Sunday from 9.30am is asked to contact Mr Keenan on 8087 2354, Major Kelvin Stace from The Salvation Army on 8087 5114 or be at the Salvation Army Hall in Wolfram Street at 9.15am.
All donations are tax deductible.

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Reading goes to the dogs

Originally published: Wednesday, 26th May, 2010

National Simultaneous Story Time, Australia's biggest single storytelling session, which reaches more than 120,000 children, will take place today.

The local library is inviting parents and children to come down to listen to stories about dogs which start at 10:30am.
The annual event is organised by the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) and the book chosen for this year is "Little White Dogs Can't Jump," by Bruce Whatley and Rosie Smith.
The is about Smudge, a dog whose legs are too short to let him jump in the car.
"The event is basically librarians or ordinary people reading one selected book at the exact same time as everyone else around Australia," said librarian Denise Orr.
"One of the best things about creating children's books is the thought of making kids smile and if possible laugh out loud," said authors Mr Whatley and Ms Smith.
"The thought of thousands of kids reading our book at the same moment and simultaneously laughing out loud is very cool!"

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Award night for IT students

Originally published: Wednesday, 26th May, 2010

Computer students will have their hard-earned skills recognised tonight when the Information Technology Section of the local TAFE holds its Presentation Night at the Musician's Club Auditorium.

The purpose of the evening is to acknowledge the efforts and achievements of the 72 students who completed computing courses in 2009.
In addition to presenting the graduating students with certificates and graduation pins, a number of special awards will also be presented.
These awards reflect the wide range of computing study options available at TAFE, including Web Design, Networking, Hardware, Digital Imaging and Software Applications.
Two students who will be receiving awards are Jade Manly and Jamie Carroll.
Jade will be has won the innofx Award for Web Design and Jamie the TechSafe Award for Computer Hardware Skills.
Jamie completed a Certificate three in Networking and Jade did a Certificate four in IT Web Design.
The awards have been made possible through the generous support of local computer businesses.
Many students who study computing at TAFE go on to work in the Information Technology (IT) industry here in Broken Hill, so the presentation evening is also a time to focus on job opportunities.
Many organisations in Broken Hill have been very generous in providing work experience for IT students, and have also taken on IT trainees.
Robynne Sanderson, head teacher of TAFE's Information Technology, said these awards provided encouragement for students who had worked hard in their courses.
"It's good encouragement to do well," she said.

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Local police chip in to end domestic violence

Originally published: Wednesday, 26th May, 2010

Support for Country Rugby League's "Tackling Domestic Violence" program has received a further boost with local police making a significant financial contribution to the program.

The Barrier Local Area Command (BLAC) have been working behind the scenes to secure $10,000 of State police funding for the initiative, which uses Rugby League as a vehicle to combat domestic violence.
"We had a number of meetings with Ken Kennedy regarding the Tackling Domestic Violence program and we saw that the project needed funding," said Local Area Commander Ian Dickson.
Mr Dickson said the funding arrived after a long submissions process with NSW Police's Policy and Program's Department.
The BLAC was able to demonstrate that the program fitted with NSW Police's "Aboriginal Strategic Direction", which aims at creating safer communities for Aboriginal people.
"We felt that the initiative fitted in neatly with our plan to reduce domestic violence within our whole command," said Mr Dickson.
"We hope it will really raise the profile of the program and encourage communities to work together and say that domestic violence isn't part of their game."
The funding will mainly be used for the creation and broadcast of a radio and television campaign that will be aired across the various networks received by Broken Hill, Menindee, Wilcannia and other regional centres.
Outback Rugby League Operations Manager, Ken Kennedy, welcomed the support of local police, and said the funding would ensure the program's message couldn't be ignored.
"It will really highlight the program and make it a big thing within these communities," said Mr Kennedy.
"The advertising will be out there and in people's faces.
"It also shows that the rugby competition itself is very community orientated... and I think the police have been very happy with what we're doing, and keeping people off the street."
A cheque for $10,000 was presented by Mr Dickson to Country Rugby League officials on Monday.
The funding follows an injection of $5,000 to the program by NSW Minister for Community Services Linda Burney on the weekend.

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Henderson's king of the green

Originally published: Wednesday, 26th May, 2010

Trevor Henderson has taken out the BH Golf and Country Club Championships for 2010 by one stroke from Mark Johns.
Henderson, with an aggregate score of 306, managed to birdie the last hole to fend off a very consistent Johns on 307.
Johns could have forced a play off if only he holed a birdie putt on the 18th, but he left it agonisingly short.
Henderson is no stranger to the title, having won this event before, and has been runner-up on numerous occasions.
No doubt Trevor will still be a force to reckon with in the future.
Mark should not be disappointed with his efforts and truly made a champion effort to try and peg Trevor back.
What a championship, coming down to the 72nd hole to decide a winner.
Cameron MacKay won the B grade title, leading all the way over the four rounds and carding 330 after 72 holes to defeat the fast finishing Declan Henderson by two strokes.
Always a difficult grade to win, Cameron virtually set up the run chase after his first round 79, which gave him some breathing space. After a nervous start to the final 18 he was doing enough to stave off a fast finishing Declan, who would be the most improved player in the club.
Declan has consistently broken his handicap in each event played and is one to watch.
Cameron Andrich took out the C grade title in a catch me if you can win on 368, 20 shots ahead of his nearest rival in Trevor Baust on 388.
When you put together four very consistent rounds it makes it very hard for the chasers to catch up, and Cameron had no challengers over the final holes and actually increased his lead.
It was a great championship for him and he more than deserved the win.
Baust had to do it the hard way for the runner-up trophy, having to defeat Stan Goodman in a sudden death play off. He held his composure well, as he did throughout the championships, and will be prominent again next year.
The club also held its veterans' 18 hole championship in conjunction with final round that was won in great style by John "scorcher" Roberts, carding 84 to hold off Wayne Holliday on 86.
It was good to see Roberts get his putter going after a disappointing time over the event, while Holliday would be rueing a couple of costly errors during his round. Without them he would have won this trophy with relative ease.
Although Goodman lost a play-off for a trophy in the championships, he did enough to win the veterans nett award, surviving a countback on 73.
Results: A grade gross: T. Henderson 306, B grade gross: C. MacKay 330, C grade gross: C Andrich 368. A grade gross runner-up: M. Johns 307, B grade gross runner-up: D. Henderson 332, C grade gross runner-up: T. Baust 388 Play-off, A grade nett: C. Jones 289, B grade nett: J. Jeffery 290, C grade nett: A. Bray 284, A grade nett runner-up: A. Ashwood 294, B grade nett runner-up: R. Pryor 291, C grade nett runner-up: M. Payne 304.
First round: Bob Warhurst Memorial Trophy, M. Payne 69 nett (countback); second round: Fosters-Dave Henderson-Wilson Trophy, C. Jones 70 nett; Third round: Barry Jackaman Trophy, Alec Bray 67 nett (countback); Fourth round: Ken Stanley Trophy, A. Ashwood 68 nett (countback). Veterans gross winner: John Roberts 84;
gross runner-up: W. Holliday 86; nett winner: S. Goodman 73 (countback).

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Pictionary Fundraiser for Autism

Originally published: Tuesday, 25th May, 2010

Locals are being invited to "sharpen their pencils" and play pictionary to raise money for autism.

"Drawtism" is a national fundraiser and Stacey Evers, the organiser of the local event, wants to raise money for those living with autism and their families.
There is no known cause or cure for this lifelong developmental disorder.
Autism affects people in three main areas; communication, social interaction and behaviour.
Anyone who has ever played pictionary can relate to the frustration of trying to make your team mates understand your drawings.
This feeling can often be similar to the constant communication challenges faced by Australians living with Autism Spectrum Disorders.
Autism Spectrum Australia (Aspect) and Mattel's Pictionary have come together to create "Drawtism".
The event will be held on June 5 at the St Pat's Hall. Dinner will be provided and the cost is $10 per ticket.
Mrs Evers' son Dylan has autism and she believes the public is not fully aware of how it affects people and their families.
She is encouraging everyone to ring up and book a table.
"It's a bit of fun and it supports a good cause," she said.
For more information contact Stacey Evers on 0409 228 572.

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Council staff get inked for cystic fibrosis

Originally published: Tuesday, 25th May, 2010

"We decided to get behind Warbo," said Judy Parr, the Manager of Community Services. "We are constantly in contact with cystic fibrosis affected people as it's part of our job here," Ms Parr said. Twenty five of her colleagues have taken up getting tattoos for the cause. Mr Warburton said he was getting very strong support from the public, describing it as "unbelievable." "I wasn't expecting this," he said. "I'm currently booked out for the rest of the week." Mr Warburton said that his original goal was to do 65 tattoos by Friday but this was looking like an underestimate. "I'm suspecting by Friday there will be about 100-plus people who have had a tattoo done," he said. The Home and Community Health Service also has a variety of activities on during the week. The day activities centre will be abuzz with around 20 people per day using it and on Thursday it will be the venue for a Biggest Morning Tea, which the public is invited to attend for the cost of a donation.

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Dylan's big effort

Originally published: Tuesday, 25th May, 2010

Twelve-year-old Broken Hill High School student Dylan Stone has raised more than $1000 for the Golden Circle fundraiser this year.

Dylan has been raising money for three weeks, and when he started he told his father Scott that $1000 was his goal.
"When he said he wanted to raise $1000, I didn't believe him and shrugged it off," Mr Stone said.
"But then he reached $400 and he kept going."
Mr Stone said that Dylan sets himself goals and almost always acheives them.
The fundraiser asked students to ask people to sponsor them to run in the cross country race that was recently.
Half of all proceeds go to charity while the other half goes towards the PE department at Broken Hill High.
Dylan also has a keen interest in sport and plays cricket, karate, tennis, skating and basketball.
He also has a passion for hockey and coaches a primary school hockey team in his spare time.
Dylan also hopes to devote some of his free time to the Salvation Army's Red Shield Appeal which is coming up soon.

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Shinglebacks big winners at Jube

Originally published: Tuesday, 25th May, 2010

The local boys were led by Garry Sandy to a convincing 58 point win over the Adelaide Rep team on Saturday.

Coach Tim McGreggor had an extended bench with 26 keen Shinglebacks ready to play, including debutants Jason Cox and Allan Rivett.
Both lizards contributed well, despite their limited background in AFL, with Cox scoring a great goal with a Rex Hunt "up town country mongrel punt kick" that wobbled through.
Friday's BDT pin-up fireman Geoffrey Lehman slammed home two first quarter goals to steer the locals to a 3-5 to nil first time scoreboard, before being banished into defence.
Goals to Clayton Trengove, Nick Pascoe, Wayne Murray and Nashy saw the locals open up a convincing half time lead 7.8 (50) to 1.1 (7).
In third quarter action Sandy streamed through half forward to score a Captain's goal before Trevor Rynne pulled in three strong marks.
After two failed offloads to Brett Morris for drop kick goal attempts Rynne calmly slotted his first major.
The goal of the day (as voted by Jim Hinton) was a 70 metre left leg snap by Hinton after dodging five tackles. A late goal to best on ground performer Dane D'Monte had the locals leading 11.12 (78) to 2.2 (14).
The final quarter saw the game erupt as the famous "Strauchnie" wig made an appearance to the wild cheers from all the visitors.
Richard McLean won the tap and the ball was whisked down to Trengove who pulled in another big grab to convert whilst the visitors were still shaking their heads in disbelief.
The most talked about point came at the 10-minute mark of the final quarter when Morris finally got his drop kick "12 point super goal" on target only for Trengove to touch the ball as it was sailing through.
The dummy spit by number 15 rivalled that of number 9's Wagga effort (when one Mark Grose marked on the goal line, woof woof).
D'Monte capped off a great game with a running goal from the Bulldog bleachers before Maurie Kumm pulled in a huge grab and slotted home the Shinglebacks' 14th major.
The Adelaide boys never gave up and piled on 3 goals to at least break even for the last quarter.
Final scores were 14.13 (97) to 6.3 (39).
For the locals any one of 10 players could have scored BOG honours as was the even contribution.
D'Monte was all class off half back, whilst Morris's five bounce effort in front of the grandstand and pass to his Shingleback "dad" Maurie Hetherton had everyone in awe.
Rynne dominated in the air at CHB and then CHF whilst Nathan Hocking finally got to taste victory.
Our greyhound Thomo just ran the visitors off their legs.
The game was brilliantly umpired by Greg Day (SA Masters Umpires Co co-ordinator) and local Master's whistler Bob Sultana.
A big thank you to the entire off field helpers including Shingleback David Bearman who treated all the injuries including Kling's hammy!
The match was played in great spirit by all players with plenty of laughs and friendships made, and built on at the Sturt Club at the after game function.
Goal scorers: Shinglebacks: Trengove 2.1, Lehman 2.0, D'Monte 2.0, Rynne 1.1, Nash 1.1, Kumm 1.0, Cox 1.0, Pascoe 1.0, Murray 1.0, Sandy 1.0, Hinton 1.0, Todd Stevens 0.2, Brad Pressler 0.2, Hayden Langdon 0.1, McLean 0.1, Craig Thomas 0.1, Justin Roberts 0.1, Morris 0.1, rushed 0.1.
Adelaide: Mick Tomney 4.1, Ian Lee 1.0, Mark Scholl 1.0, Rushed 0.2.
Best players: D'Monte, Morris, Rynne, Nathan Hocking, Thomas, Sandy, Cox, Lehman, Pressler in a great full team effort.
The Shinglebacks attention now turns to the June long weekend where a combined Sydney/Riverina squad is planning to tackle the lizards at the Jube.
The big road trip for 2010 is on July 9-11 when we launch our new Shingleback strip in Noarlunga in front of our Adelaide based sponsors, the Shingleback Winery. Players (and or partners) intending on travelling down for this game against South's AFL Masters need to let Nashy know ASAP so accommodation etc can be organised.
The BHFL should also be congratulated for altering usual game times to accommodate our game between the local footy and the rugby, in what was a very busy day for League officials.

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Action aplenty

Originally published: Monday, 24th May, 2010

Perfect weather and top class drivers made for a great first day to the 4x4 Outback Challenge on Saturday afternoon.

More than 200 spectators set up on the edge of Stephen's Creek to watch the Challenge.
Locals Tony Bright and John Clemens were pleased with their performance, completing the Stephen's Creek track in six minutes and 38 seconds.
Both said their vehicle held up well in terms of what obstacles were on the track and how other competitors pulled up.
"We did well, the car held up well," Bright said.
"Finishing the game is the main goal and I think we handled things well," added  Clemens.
Visiting competitors Peter Mihaloff and Clinton Sharp took out first place on the first day with a time of five minutes and 19 seconds.
New drivers David White and Peter Sayers were the first to face the track, and lost their suspension over one tough jump early in the contest.
The pair travelled faced lengthy repairs before the competition continued yesterday.
Competition this week includes sessions on the sand at Denian, south east of the city.

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Thanks to "super" mum

Originally published: Monday, 24th May, 2010

A local woman and her husband who have cared for 54 vulnerable children over 14 years were yesterday thanked for their efforts.

During a weekend visit to the city NSW Minister for Community Services Linda Burney met foster carer Di Robinson and her husband to thank the couple and send out a call for more foster parents.
Di currently cares for Aboriginal siblings aged 15 and 16, who have been with her for 11 years.
The children have become "so much a part of the family" that they stayed with the family after Di suffered a debilitating stroke several years ago.
"We just couldn't bear to let them go, they are family," said Di, who also has two biological daughters aged 20 and 22.
Di was inspired to become a carer after meeting a group of foster children who were out with their foster family. She said that fostering has changed her outlook on life - made her more understanding.
"I have had to learn sign language and medical terminology to help my foster daughter who has hearing problems. Every child brings his or her particular challenges. It is hard, but rewarding work," she said.
Di celebrated her 44th birthday yesterday.
Ms Burney said there was an urgent need for more people in Broken Hill to open up their hearts and homes to vulnerable children.
"Thousands of children every year come into care because they cannot live safely with their own families. These children urgently need safe and loving homes," she said.
"We need more people from all walks of life to come on board now to take on this important role."
Carers can be single, de facto, with or without children and from any religious or cultural background.
"We need people who care about children, people who are responsible, healthy and
have the energy and stamina to look after children.
"People can choose to be a long term carer, or can take in children for a few nights in an emergency, or a respite carer who helps on weekends or a few times a month.
"I encourage people to think about fostering and consider whether they have the patience, compassion and energy to help children and young people in need. Fostering is not for everyone and there are challenges along the way. Many of these children have suffered unimaginable trauma in their short lives, which can have a profound impact on their behaviour.
"But foster carers will receive help every step of the way. They receive training, caseworker support, foster peer group support and an allowance to cover most expenses of raising a foster child."
The website, www.fosteringnsw.com.au, provides a one-stop shop for people wanting to learn more and outlines the steps to apply. For more information interested people can also call 1800 2 367 837).

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Burke Ward Band looking for back to back win

Originally published: Monday, 24th May, 2010

Entries for the 41st annual Eisteddfod end early next month, with instrumental band contestants facing tough competition from a back-to-back winner.

The Burke Ward Band is just one of the local contenders that have been a part of the tradition for many years.
The fife and drum band, which performs at the Anzac Day marches, has won its category of the competition for the past two years.
Sarah Tweedy, the Eisteddfod's instrumental teacher, said she was really proud of the students carrying on the tradition, and hopes the event will match up to last year's.
"The kids do a really good job.
"It's a real tradition for Burke Ward and it's something the kids are really proud to uphold," Ms Tweedy said.
Dance, vocal, instrumental and drama are just some of the other categories that people are being invited to perform in.
Entries close on June 4.
The Eisteddfod will be held from August 21 to 25.

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River claims League Cup

Originally published: Monday, 24th May, 2010

Close to 600 spectators and NSW Minister for Community Services Linda Burney braved the cold for the launch of the Tackling Domestic Violence Cup on Saturday night at the Jubilee Oval.

Outback Rugby League's (CRL) River took on City for the second annual representative sides match which saw the Wilcannia-Menindee combination claim the match - 46 to 24.
The new competition recognises the League's involvement in Tackling Violence, the NSW Government's anti-domestic violence program, which provides sponsorship to participating regional Rugby League clubs to run local campaigns aimed at reducing domestic violence.
"It is going to be hard for some people, because we all have to confront what domestic violence is, but at the end of the day, this is about children," Ms Burney told league fans on Saturday night.
"This is about making homes safe, loving places for children to go to sleep and wake up not worrying what they're going to find when they get out of bed," Ms Burney said.
Ms Burney was joined by local MP John Williams, CRL's Operations Manager Ken Kennedy, Councillor Tom Kennedy and former NRL player Ricky Walford.
City Council's general manager, Mr Frank Zaknich also acknowledged the importance of the program.
"It's vitally important, and rugby league has a great following in Broken Hill so this will definitely raise some awareness," he said.
A stall was also set up at the oval, with pamphlets and brochures on helping Aboriginal families raise their families.
The River side had a strong following and came out strongly in the first half.
River's Thomas Whyman and Brendan Jones scored the first tries for the match, both with excellent ball work.
Chris Nicholls scored for City, giving his side its first try for the match, a third of the way through the game.
Leonard Whyman made a great tackle, while Ike Williams scored River's third try for the evening.
City's star import, Robbie O'Davis, of Newcastle Knights fame, had the ball all to himself in an open half, but put his foot out of bounds, causing a commotion on and off field.
O'Davis' NRL opponent, former Cronulla and Rabbitohs player David Peachey, cleaned up towards the final half as River turned defense into attack.
Reggie Shepherd scored the fourth try for River with six minutes left on the clock.
At the beginning of the second half River led by 20 points, but City fought back in the first five minutes, scoring a much needed try.
Commentator Steve Baker said City had too much frustration and needed discipline.
Shawn Kemp scored the final try for City, for a 34 to 24 scoreline.
Fan favourite Reggie Shepherd turned up the heat as he scored the game's last try for River. River 46 beat City 24.
Outback Rugby League President Dave Gallagher commended spectators on their behaviour.
"It shows that an event without alcohol can become a great family night out, and I'm very happy with the crowd's behaviour."
The Man of the Match award was presented by Mr Ken Kennedy and Ms Burney to River's Kevin Newman.

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Max fan builds a museum piece

Originally published: Friday, 21st May, 2010

A die-hard fan of the Mad Max movies has built a replica of the original "evil" car and has added it to the museum in Silverton.

The museum, owned and run by Silverton local Adrian Bennett, will house the car indefinitely.
The Ford Landau was replicated by Sydney man George Kritty who said that it cost him more than $5000 to build.
"When I came out of the first Mad Max, I said 'what a film!'" Mr Kritts said.
"The characters were amazing and the cars themselves were also the characters."
It took Mr Kritty two years to get the parts, some of which he had shipped from the US.
"The detail is not 100 per cent but it's pretty close," he said.
For the last couple of days, the car has been parked outside the Silverton pub, and is already a hit with locals, many stopping by to take photos and have a look.
Mr Kritty is also looking forward to the fourth edition of the Mad Max series.
"I'm really looking forward to it, but it's a shame they couldn't get Mel Gibson back.
Mr Kritty now has plans to replicate another of the film's cars, but this time he says it will be one of the "goody's" cars.

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$5m to fund pool upgrade

Originally published: Friday, 21st May, 2010

New additions to the Broken Hill Regional Aquatic centre will now go ahead and local jobs will be created with the help of $5 million from the Federal Government.

About 210 people will be employed during construction and another 50 over the long term, according to the Federal Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government, Anthony Albanese, who came to the city yesterday to make the welcome announcement.
There was also the lasting benefit to the community, Mr Albanese said.
City Council has already contributed $5 million to the expansion of the pool.
The extra facilities at the aquatic centre include a new hydrotherapy pool for the elderly and disabled.
City Council's Manager for Infrastructure, Paul DeLisio, said the funding will go towards stages two and three of the pool development project.
Stage two will see the 25 metre pool, which has already had a new ramp installed, receive new plumbing.
Also included is a water playground for children. This will see the toddlers' pool made into water features for children to play in.
A new amenities block, cafe and kiosk will also built to replace the old toilet and canteen, and a new entry system will be built as well as a new function room.
Stage three of the project will facilitate the development of the new hydrotherapy pool which will open to everyone.
City Council had submitted an application for more infrastructure funding to help develop the pool and Mayor Wincen Cuy said yesterday that he was pleasantly surprised to receive the money.
He congratulated the Rudd government for the much-needed funding and said that the previous Council and its administrator, Ken Boyle, also deserved credit for having the new pool built in the first place.
The funding, according to Mr Cuy, showed Broken Hill was still on the map.
"This town isn't lost or forgotten," he said.
He said Council did not know how long it will take to start the building process but the draft plan was out with all the "bells and whistles" accommodated for.
Along with his visit to the pool yesterday, Mr Albanese also inspected the new Mercury Street Storm Water Detention Basin and the Royal Flying Doctor Service base, both of which have previously received funding from the government.

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Far west rail upgrade

Originally published: Friday, 21st May, 2010

The railway lines from Broken Hill to Whyalla and Parkes will get new concrete sleepers and rails that will cut travel times and permit the use of heavier trains.

The upgrade, costing $312 million, was announced in the city yesterday by the Federal Transport Minister, Anthony Albanese.
Mr Albanese said the upgrade was part of an "unprecedented" $565 million investment in rail infrastructure in Far Western NSW.
"This investment will not only greatly improve the capacity and reliability of the interstate rail network; it will deliver real jobs and inject new money into communities across the region," he said.
The $312m will allow the Australian Rail Track Corporation (ARTC) to re-rail the lines between Whyalla and Broken Hill, and Parkes and Broken Hill.
This will not only allow both lines to be used by heavier trains but will support 275 jobs and take about 25 months to complete, the minister said.
Replacing the old wooden sleepers on the line between Parkes and Broken Hill with one million new concrete sleepers will greatly improve its capacity as well as reduce transit times and the need for temporary speed restrictions during summer.
Replacing the wooden sleepers will cost $253 million and will support up to 370 jobs and take about 13 months to finish, Mr Albanese said.
He said he expected work on both projects to begin later this year.
The ARTC is the government-owned entity responsible for managing the nation's interstate rail network.
The Government was putting an extra $1 billion into the ARTC, bringing the total investment in this "vital piece of infrastructure" to $3.4 billion over six years, Mr Albanese said.
"Compared to our predecessors, this is twice as much in half the time - yet another example of this Government using the dividends of today's prosperity to build an even stronger and more prosperous Australia for the future."
Mr Albanese said that while the federal opposition would call it a "spending spree", the funding will provide hundreds of jobs and boost efficiency in the national rail network.

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Jube to host major league

Originally published: Friday, 21st May, 2010

The River v City blockbuster Rugby
League match will be played at the Jubilee
Oval on Saturday with two star players lending
a hand.
It will be the first time that Rugby League has
been played on the Jube.
The River-City match was originally played in
the late 1980s to early 1990s, but started again
last year.
Project Manager of Country Rugby League
NSW, Ken Kennedy, said it was a “good concept
to pick up again.”
Two teams from Wilcannia and Menindee
will combine to make the River side. The City
side will have the Geebungs and the Saints join
forces.
Two former NRL stars will also play in the
match.
Former Cronulla player David Peachey will
join the Rivers side, and Robbie O’Davis from
Newcastle Knights will play with City.
“Both teams look very strong, it’ll be a close
game,” said Mr Kennedy.
River has a strong backline, with Thomas
Whyman from Wilcannia taking charge.
Michael Kennedy from Wilcannia and Mel
Williamson from Menindee make for a strong
centre combination.
Up front, Ike Williams and Gerald Quayle from
Menindee and Paul Marriott from Wilcannia are
players to watch.
Coaches have done well in pairing up the two
star players, Robbie O’Davis and David Peachey
at fullback.
The City side has a strong forward pack with
Chris Nichols and Clint Kemp from the Saints.
The Geebung trio of Clint Squires, Robert
Young and Michael Tree are another group of
players that spectators should keep an eye on.
Mr Kennedy expects the match to be a lot
closer than last season’s game.
In 2009, the Rivers opened the flood gates on
City, winning by more than 70 points.
The night starts at 6pm with Willyama High
School taking on Wilcannia Central School.
This will be followed by the Outback Academy
and Development Squad match at 6.30pm as
the curtainraiser to the River v City Match at
7.30pm.

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Mayor's trucks u-turn

Originally published: Thursday, 20th May, 2010

Mayor Wincen Cuy has conceded that Perilya's development application does request permission to run up to 108 trucks daily from a restarted Potosi mine.

Mr Cuy told ABC radio on Monday that he and other councillors were told in a Perilya briefing that the company wanted to run about one truck per hour from the mine to the Southern Operations.
He also said that he did not know where the "100" truck figure had come from.
The comments came after Perilya's managing director Paul Arndt last week told ABC Radio that a suggestion it wanted to move more than 100 trucks per day, as highlighted by the BDT, was "nonsense".
Despite the BDT seeking clarification from Perilya on a number of occasions the company still refuses to say anything other than that their comment is "no comment".
Mr Arndt's claim directly contradicts Perilya's Potosi mine development application, lodged with City Council and which closed for public comment yesterday.
It seeks approval to move on average of 48 B-double trucks per 24 hour period, and no more than 108 B-doubles per 24 hour period, seven days per week.
Mayor Cuy yesterday admitted the DA did contain a request to run as many as 108 B-double trucks in a day.
"The 108 is in Perilya's DA but there are issues to be clarified before this comes before Council's deliberation such as RTA, EPA and all the other governing and regulatory bodies," he said.
"It's up to 108 trucks per day during peak production."
Perilya said it wants to use road transport to cart ore from Potosi as it would be cheaper and quicker than the alternatives.
The company said the railway line from the North mine to the South was not up to standard and that there was not enough room on the tracks to make it viable.
They also said building a haulage road around the city would be too expensive, too time consuming and would result in traffic using it as an unofficial bypass "imposing unreasonable road maintenance costs on Perilya".
The mayor said that no Council decision would be made until all the usual steps in considering and approving a DA had been taken, including consideration by each of the city's councillors.
"Public submissions are a major input into this whole process," Mr Cuy said.
"Each individual councillor will make up their own mind based on the evidence provided to them at the time."
Mr Cuy also moved to silence critics who accused him of not living on the proposed trucking route and therefore not being able to understand their frustrations.
"This will affect me to some extent because I actually own a motel on Argent Street," he said.
Potosi is under care and maintenance but if reopened would produce around 400,000 of tonnes of ore per year for four to five years.

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Spreading diabetes message

Originally published: Thursday, 20th May, 2010

Burke Ward School students have gone all out for an awareness week about type 1 juvenile diabetes.

The school's student representative council (SRC) organised the week dedicated to the disease which affects one student from the school. Joshua Niarros, in year one, has juvenile diabetes.
Kristie Pascoe, the SRC director and year one teacher, said that Joshua's mother asked if this type of diabetes could be the focus of the school's disease awareness week.
"This week's message is 'put some jelly in your belly," Ms Pascoe said.
The SRC held a "guess how many jelly babies are in the jar" game and a poster design competition. They also sold wrist bands with diabetes messages on them.
A lunchtime disco and casual clothes day added to the day's entertainment, with a gold coin donation from each student going to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.
As well as the fun, local diabetes educator Peter Prime spoke to the students  about how to live a healthy life.

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Area stars in TV series

Originally published: Thursday, 20th May, 2010

The arid country around Broken Hill will feature in a new TV show starting in July.

The show "Miracles" contrasts the visual beauty of the Broken Hill region with a "brutal journey of survival".
The three-part series includes three titles: Miracle in the Storm, Miracle in the Desert and Miracle in the Jungle.
Miracle in the Desert was filmed locally in April last year.
Each episode tells the story of one person's fight against the elements, against time and against death.
City Council's General Manager, Frank Zaknich, commended the Film Broken Hill (FBH) team for the support they gave the cast and crew during their filming.
"Film Broken Hill provided a number of services to the company, ensuring that they had access appropriate information and locations during the pre and post filming stages. The organisation has an excellent record in providing support services to the film industry," Mr Zaknich said.
Film BH is a joint initiative of the Far Western Regional Development Board, the NSW Department of State and Regional Development, City Council and local freelance technicians.
The organisation works with local authorities, technicians and the NSW Film & Television Office.
FBH provides an information and referral service to filmmakers and commercial photographers about all aspects of shooting in Far Western NSW.


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Set your sights on shoot

Originally published: Thursday, 20th May, 2010

Broken Hill's shooting fellowship is being invited to attend the Diggers' Day Shoot this weekend.

Anyone who is interested in rifle shooting can test their skills on Sunday, May 23 at the annual event.
The shoot raises funds for Legacy and will be held at the rifle range on the Tibooburra Road.
This will be followed by a 300 yard Centrefire shoot which will be open to sporting and 303 rifles.
A nomination fee of $20 applies to all shooters and a fee of $15 for juniors.
Licences must be displayed by all licenced shooters when nominating.
Unlicensed shooters are welcome, but conditions apply.
Anyone seeking further information can contact Paul Reed on 80882512, Peter Jennings on 80882420 or Bill Vickers on 80872932.

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Truck anger grows

Originally published: Wednesday, 19th May, 2010

The group “Residents Against Contaminated Environments” has been inundated with calls following the mayor’s dismissive comments about trucking movements from the Potosi mine.
RACE, formed last year to get a better outcome for residents in relation to mining activities, said members were angry that Mayor Wincen Cuy said a request by Perilya to move up to 108 B-double trucks per day could disrupt “maybe a few people”.
“I have had so many angry people calling me,” said founding member Kathy Holmes.
“The inconvenience of ‘a few people’. The very few residents he’s talking about - and there are quite a few - are all ratepayers and ratepayers voted him and the rest of the Council in.”
On local ABC Radio on Monday, Mr Cuy dismissed claims that Perilya wanted to run more than 100 Bdouble trucks per day through the city.
He was also unsure what hours the mining company intended to run trucks from their Potosi mine through the city to their mine in South Broken Hill.
Mr Cuy was not challenged on the figures by the ABC’s announcer and is yet to return the BDT’s requests for an interview.
“It’s not 100 trucks,” Mr Cuy told the ABC.
“The briefing that we’ve been ... given it’ll be about one an hour on a 24 hour - but they don’t want to be ... hauling 24 hours neither.
“That’s the briefing we’ve been given and I don’t see where 100 trucks come into it.”
Mr Cuy said while the impact should be minimised where possible, jobs should be considered before the disruption to “a few people”.

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Fundraiser that's sure to leave its (ink) mark

Originally published: Wednesday, 19th May, 2010

Stephen “Warbo” Warburton and his wife Belinda are raising
money for Cystic Fibrosis by selling 65 rose tattoos.
The couple said they were browsing the internet when they came across the website for Cystic Fibrosis.
“It just tore at our heart strings,” said Belinda.
Cystic Fibrosis is the most common life-threatening, recessive
genetic condition affecting children in Australia. It affects a number of organs in the body (especially the lungs and pancreas) by clogging them with thick, sticky mucus.
It is often called “65 Roses”, which comes from a story of a little boy’s efforts to pronounce his sister’s life. The rose is the national symbol of Cystic Fibrosis.
To raise money for 65 Roses Day (May 28), Warbo will be selling rose tattoos starting from $30 and temporary tattoos for $5.
“The majority of the money raised will go to Cystic Fibrosis Australia,” said Belinda.
Priceline is also donating aftercare cream to put on the tattoos
which will help cover the costs.
The Warburtons are registered with Cystic Fibrosis Australia and are encouraging people to help in any way, even by just getting a temporary tattoo.
For more information contact Warbo or Belinda on 80882703.

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Plan to ensure studio viable beyond Mad Max

Originally published: Wednesday, 19th May, 2010

A consultancy group will be helping City Council to run the city’s new film studio after filming for Mad Max 4 is completed.
Business consultants from AECOM will attend several workshops at the Royal Exchange Hotel with the aim of finalising a business plan for the Broken Hill Film, Studio and Precinct.
“We’ll be helping the Council make a product commercially viable,” consultant Stephen Bargwanna said.
“It’s an ideal location for shooting.”

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South will roll West

Originally published: Wednesday, 19th May, 2010

Game one tonight will see West take on the all-conquering South.
It is hard to make a case for the Robins who have unfortunately not followed up their promising efforts from the first two rounds.
The West runners have been in good form with Nick Agius leading the way.
Agius is a quality player with a big future and is someone many West teams to come can be built around.
Cynan Smith, Brett Martin, Jono Naden and Nathan Kickett show promising signs but need to find consistency.

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Famous books inspire musical

Originally published: Tuesday, 18th May, 2010

A musical based on the Dr Seuss books and co-written by one of the Monty Python team will be Theatre 44’s next production.

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Ex-local joins exclusive club

Originally published: Tuesday, 18th May, 2010

A former apprentice at the Zinc Corporation has joined an exclusive club of engineers.

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Hockey returns to Norm Fox

Originally published: Tuesday, 18th May, 2010

Game 1: Orange v Blue

The opening match of the 2010 BH Hockey Season saw the Orange Pharmers take on the blue team. Orange started the game short of numbers, but teams were soon evened up with the late arrival of Magill and Liceralde. Orange received the first short corner of the match, with another following immediately. Unfortunately, Blue’s defence was too strong and Orange missed the opportunity to score on both. McEvoy was sterling in defence for Orange, attacking ball and players relentlessly.

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Perilya should look at rail option: ALP

Originally published: Tuesday, 18th May, 2010

The local Australian Labor Party branch said Perilya should consider other options when it comes to truck movements from the Potosi mine.

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Veterans remember battle at reunion

Originally published: Monday, 17th May, 2010

Hundreds of Vietnam Veterans marched through the city streets on Saturday afternoon for the “Coral in the Hill” reunion. A small number of onlookers clapped andcheered as the men made their way to a memorial service at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Argent Street.

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Vintage cars cruise on through

Originally published: Monday, 17th May, 2010

Three couples from NSW and Queensland have made the drive to Broken Hill for a meet and greet with fellow car enthusiasts.

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RSPCA worker notches up 30 years' service

Originally published: Monday, 17th May, 2010

She started at the RSPCA as a volunteer and, 30 years later, Catherine Hyde is still caring for creatures great and small.

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Pies flying high

Originally published: Monday, 17th May, 2010

Centrals have opened up a 3 game buffer over North’s and remain undefeated for season 2010, after 5 rounds, with a strong four quarter team effort.

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Nature throws up new challenge to 4x4

Originally published: Friday, 14th May, 2010

Australia’s toughest four-wheel-drive event revs up again next week. Pitting man and machine against the wild, the 12th Outback 4x4 Challenge will fire up next Friday, with 26 modified vehicles vying for the title of Australia’s toughest vehicle/driver combination. The local team of Tony Bright and John Clemens are back in action along with a second-time Venezuelan team and 24 other national competitors from Victoria, SA, NSWand Western Australia. Competition manager Paul Vanderhorst said the recent rain would bring some special challenges to the event. “In the mud, yes. The water coming out of the Darling will have an effect on the lagoons,” Mr Vanderhorst said. “Dry creeks will be wet and muddy and some of the water holes will be deep.” He said the event was not for the faint-hearted. “Have you ever dangled off the end of your winch cable vertically while your navigator instructs you with the recovery?
It’s awesome!” Drivers must be able to drive or winch up and down walls that are almost vertical, they must be able to drive and navigate treacherous cross country areas where there are no roads or towns for many miles, and show excellent mechanical, first aid, orienteering and general knowledge skills.
But Mr Vanderhorst said it was safe as the vehicles were built
tough. “All the vehicles are fitting out with vehicle harnesses, roll bars and all that stuff,” he said.
“Cars are built to be able to cope with a rollover. They are all
using high-tech winches and high-tech gear.
“They are built very tough. These are not your standard four-wheeldrives.” The event will begin at the racecourse with team scrutineering and vehicle checks before the cars and crews go bush bashing. Mr Vanderhorst said the course would take in three properties around Menindee and Broken Hill so that drivers encountered sand, mud and rocks. “There’s a good
diversity of terrain.” A special stage will also be held at Stephens Creek on Saturday, May 22.

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Silver City stars in new kid's novel

Originally published: Friday, 14th May, 2010

Broken Hill is among a number of country towns that will appear in a new series of novels for primary school children.
The students are learning more about country Australia thanks to a new fiction series by author Phil Kettle and the
Australian Geographic magazine.
The series “Our Australia”, launched in February, is being introduced into schools and sold in book stores nationally. Broken Hill is featured and other towns in the series include Mildura, Longreach and Alice Springs.
“It’s compelling, it’s fun, and it’s relevant to our current curriculum,” said the author.
“These books teach all children about the rich and precious diversity of our country.”
Mr Kettle has travelled around Australia and said he found that children lacked knowledge about the bush. He said he hoped the part-fiction, partfact stories might entice them to learn more about their own country. Each of the eight books in the series explores the nation through the eyes of Taha, a young boy who is being taken on a voyage of discovery by his mother.
The series will be followed by another two in 2011 and 2012.
The General Manager of Australian Geographic Education, Jo Runciman, said the company had received a good response to the stories.

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Diabetes big problem in outback towns

Originally published: Friday, 14th May, 2010

Local health workers have been learning about
diabetes in the desert.
“Diabetes in the Desert” is a two-day conference coordinated
by the Maari Ma Aboriginal Health Corporation.
Maari Ma Clinical Health Consultant-Diabetes Educator,
Frith Semmens, said the organisation held a diabetes
conference annually and had worked hard and secured
funding to bring this year’s event to Broken Hill.
Held at the Mulberryvale estate on Wednesday and
yesterday, it has attracted diabetes educators from as far
afield as Melbourne and Adelaide.
Featuring guest speeches from diabetes specialists from
Adelaide, the conference is a chance for health workers to
network and share knowledge.
Ms Semmens said Broken Hill was a ‘perfect location’
for the gathering, given an increase in obesity rates among
the Aboriginal population.
A dinner on Wednesday night had been well attended
by doctors from private practice, the Flying Doctor and
the hospital, as well as professionals from Wilcannia and
Menindee.
“These two days have been really successful, really
relevant,” she said.
Diabetes was a more pronounced issue in country areas,
Ms Semmens said, as it went hand in hand with obesity.
Country people in remote areas had less access to
nutritional foods and exercise options like activity centres
and sporting clubs.
“It makes it very difficult to eat well and to interact and
become more active,” she said.
“We’re very lucky to have these speakers. We’re learning
a lot of things.
“We’ve heard today that it’s better to eat a substantial
meal in the morning and follow it with smaller meals
throughout the day when you’re burning your energy, rather
than going to bed on a full stomach.”

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Dedication pays for West junior

Originally published: Friday, 14th May, 2010

West footballer Nathan Kickett has inched closer
to State representation after being selected in the
NSW/ACT Rams Under 16 State squad.
The 16-year-old earned his place after a strong
performance for the Southern NSW Stingrays team at the
recent Zone Trials in Sydney.
“I was a bit surprised, but I was really happy I made it
- and excited as well,” he said.
Kickett played a number of positions at the Trials,
impressing selectors with his versatility and strong
marking.
“I think I had a pretty good carnival, I felt pretty good
about myself afterward.
“It was harder, faster and more intense than the local
footy. It was really good.”
Local AFL NSW/ACT Development Officer Dale
Tonkin said Kickett’s recent dedication to training had
paid dividends, and would remain a key factor as he
strives to forge a career in football.
“Nathan has elevated himself to a higher standard
through his increased work ethic and fitness levels -
along with his natural footballing ability and smarts.
“His overhead marking, awareness and ability to bring
other players into the make him a potent and versatile
player.
“With his continued effort it should see him playing
football at a higher level.”
Kickett will again travel to Sydney this weekend for
the Rams Camp, where the squad of 40 will be further
trimmed.
Should he make the cut, he will compete at the 2010
NAB Rising Stars National Championships in July.
The National Championships are a pivotal fixture for
the country’s best junior footballers. The carnival will
provide players with vital exposure to the many AFL
scouts who attend

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Volunteer night attracts big crowd

Originally published: Thursday, 13th May, 2010

Tribute was paid to local volunteers on Tuesday evening with a dinner and presentation at the Entertainment Centre.

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Local knowledge could lead you to treasure

Originally published: Thursday, 13th May, 2010

Fancy yourself as an expert on local knowledge? Then the “Jazzy Treasure Hunt via Car” could be just the thing for you.

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A day for the nurses

Originally published: Thursday, 13th May, 2010

The hospital celebrated by displaying nurses' uniforms from different era's in the foyer and also held a free barbecue for all the nursing staff.

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Big field for cross country dash

Originally published: Thursday, 13th May, 2010

The students were allowed to run or walk the 3.3 kilometre track around the race course.

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Truck Highway "danger"

Originally published: Wednesday, 12th May, 2010

South Broken Hill resident Robyn Gould said she wants more people to see and comment on Perilya's development application which, if approved, would see up to 108 trucks a day rumble past some residents' homes.
"I'm sure people aren't aware of what they are proposing and they need to be," Mrs Gould said.
"That's a lot of truck movements. It's an accident waiting to happen."
The majority-owned Chinese company lodged the DA, currently open for public comment, with City Council to restart mining at Potosi.
It wants to transport ore from the mine, 5.5 km north of the city centre, to the Southern Operations concentrator.
If approved up to six B-double trucks every hour for 15 hours per day would drive through the city - that's one truck every 10 minutes.
From 7am to 10pm every day Perilya wants the trucks to rumble from the Potosi mine, down Argent Street, turning left at the Menindee Road then right onto Holten Drive before driving along Eyre Street past the St Anne's Nursing Home and the new film studio, crossing the Eyre and Bonanza street roundabout before entering the south mine entrance.
While Perilya said there would usually be only 48 heavy vehicles movements (24 loads) per 7am to 10pm shift Mrs Gould said that was still too many.
"Does it matter if there's 10 less?"
Perilya also wants to allow two trucks per hour on the same route overnight - between 10pm and 7am.
But Mrs Gould said that's ridiculous and a new option must be found.
"There's the nursing home up there and the film studio. That's not good," she said.
"Build a haul road around the back that's not going to interfere with anyone. Or fix the rail and use that."
The company said it did consider a number of alternatives.
An option to use rail only was deemed unfeasible due to the condition of track and rolling stock and the risk of injury and environmental or property damage from derailment.
But Mrs Gould believes there would be more injury and damage if there was a truck crash or rollover.
"Well what about B-doubles crashing into pedestrians or rolling over on the road - there's a lot more at stake," she said.
"What do they think would happen with a B-double on the road?
"The main aspect is safety. That's seven days a week traffic we're talking about.
"That's a lot of trucks on that road."
Perilya said building a private haul road around the city, using no public roads, was rejected because it would need to buy the land and construct the road which would be cost and time prohibitive.
It also said the road would become "an unofficial by-pass, allowing motorists to avoid travelling through the city of Broken Hill and imposing unreasonable road maintenance costs on Perilya".
"I think it's absolute rubbish. It's an excuse," Mrs Gould said.
"Why would they want to cut across there?
"Turn that around on its head and it's going to be the same thing to lots of people (and council) with the volume of those trucks and other vehicles on that road."
Another option, building a road through the northern operations bypassing the Barrier Highway and Menindee Road, would require road modifications, including constructing a new intersection and that, Perilya said, was likely not to be approved.
That option would also require heavy vehicles to pass under a mill overhead conveyor which Perilya deems unsafe. To remove it or to build a road around it would cost Perilya more.
"They're saying money to everything," Mrs Gould said.
"Everything's going to cost money and they'll make a great deal of money."
The DA also includes a decline, construction of a power line, substation haul road, extension of the Potosi mine office, building a workshop/store area and an unsealed parking lot.
The development application is now open for public comment at the City Council office and residents have until next Wednesday to do so.

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John Hart steps into the light

Originally published: Wednesday, 12th May, 2010

A well-known local artist is profiled in the latest edition of one of Australia's leading art magazines.

John Hart's artwork is included in the May-July edition of Australian Art Review (aAR), a quarterly magazine and one of the foremost publications on art in the nation.
City Council's Regional Art Gallery manager, Bruce Tindale, said this had put John Hart's skills on display and showed that he was more than the son of a famous father.
"His dad was predominantly self-taught but John went off and studied at the Central Art School in Adelaide and undertook a more contemporary, rigorous training," Mr Tindale said.
"It's basically helping John to carve out his own identity within the Australian art world, and being published in a magazine of this quality helps draw him to the attention of institutions and collectors.
"Being published is very good for propelling a national artist and getting some national acclaim."
Mr Tindale said the profile piece on John Hart, titled 'Novel twists and turns,' was written by visual art and art history writer Prue Gibson.
"She is a leading critic and curator and John has been singled out by someone who knows a lot about Australian art," he said.
"You need to be on your way somewhere - they don't just publish anyone. These articles are critical."
The profile displays John's photo realism work. It displays artworks from 'Through a glass darkly,' which was exhibited at the local gallery last year, and from his 'Analogue' series which featured pieces of crumpled paper.
John Hart described his work as a collision of classical painting, photography and digital imaging.
He has been working in this field since the mid 1990s but the advent of modern technology has propelled his work into what it is today.
"Not at this level ... but going back to the start of 1996 on and off and introducing this digital photography really helped."
John Hart is sculptor, photographer and painter. When beginning a work he does not have an end in mind and invents his model, in this case using a standard double white sheet, which can take minutes or days.
He then photographs it using a digital camera and manipulates it using computer programs before painting it on canvas using oil paints.
From start to finish it's a time consuming job.
"My maximum output is 15 paintings per year."
The work looks extraordinarily like a photograph and leads to the question, why?
"It's pushing the boundaries and making people think of things differently," he said.
While the art may look black and white John claims to have never used black paint, instead using a build up of dark tertiary colours and whites.
He said the inclusion in the magazine was a pat on the back.
"I was thrilled. It's great to get the recognition," he said.
"And it has been absolutely no hindrance living in Broken Hill."
Mr Tindale said the profile also helped put the city's changing art community on the map.
"John's chosen to live here now and the fact that he lives here draws the attention to Broken Hill being a lively arts community," he said.
"I think it just puts that little bit of awareness out there and it all helps."

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No shortage of help for young fundraiser

Originally published: Wednesday, 12th May, 2010

Willyama High School student and charity worker, Hayden Zammit, now has the support of several organisations for his trip to the US in July.

Rotary Broken Hill has donated $2000 towards his trip to the Global Young Leaders conference where students aged from 15 to 18 will have the chance to voice their views on world issues.
"Hayden has raised over $30,000 collectively for the community, so it's time to give back to him for his work," said Rotary treasurer Kevin Hind.
Hayden brought his case to Rotary and the organisation decided to donate towards his once in a lifetime trip after hearing of an impressive body of work.
He has also received donations from two other major organisations.
The NSW Department of Education gave $1000 and Rex Airlines donated a return flight from Sydney valued at $600.
Hayden has hosted several Biggest Morning Teas, raised money for Camp Quality and was one of 2009's recipients of the Australia Day Awards.
"It was great to have community support from local regions and state levels," he said.
The 11-day conference runs from July 11 to 22 in Washington D.C. and New York City.

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Young basketballer makes the grade

Originally published: Wednesday, 12th May, 2010

Local boy Isaac Cumming has been selected to play for the NSW State Primary School's Sports Association's (PSSA) basketball team in Darwin this August.

The Morgan Street Public School student was "over the moon" and "looking forward to the challenges coming up", according to his mother Melissa.
Isaac won selection for his perfomance at the NSW PSSA basketball carnival last week in Sydney.
"Isaac played awesomely at the Sydney carnival, and to be one of only ten selected out 140 players is a great achievement," said Barrier Boys Basketball coach Sharon Degoumois.
He is the first local picked for the State side since Heath Caldwell in 2005.
Isaac's family will be holding several small fundraising activites to help with the $1400 cost of the trip.
Two-dollar raffle tickets are on sale at shops around Broken Hill, with prizes ranging from a laptop to a flat screen TV.
The National Championship run from August 7 to 13.

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Zinc Oval worries force junior footy to seek new home

Originally published: Tuesday, 11th May, 2010

Junior football is searching for a new home as it faces the prospect of a future without the Zinc Oval.

President Ray Steer yesterday confirmed the association had begun a process to find another venue for the popular junior football competition.
The move follows a proposal to transfer some of Perilya's non-mining assets to new owners, including City Council.
Mr Steer said that while he understood a decision had not yet been made on the future of the Zinc Ovals, the association was planning for the future.
"We've got to look at other options," he told the BDT.
Almost 550 children play junior football each weekend at the two ovals and Mr Steer said it would be "a big commitment" to move.
A sub-committee has been formed to look at options which include moving games to the Memorial, Jubilee, Picton and Alma ovals.
While he had his own opinion, Mr Steer said that a wide variety of stakeholders, including the league, would be consulted before a final decision was made.
"We won't be able to please everybody ... but at the end of the day there are options," he said.
"I'd like to keep it out the South. The Alma is an under-utilised ground."
The loss of one oval means the association may consider using two different grounds or spreading the competition over three days instead of the current two.
Currently four age groups - under 6s through to under 12s - use the Zinc Ovals on Saturday, while the two oldest groups, under 14s and 16s, play on Sunday.
He said one option being considered would be to hold the Under 6s and 8s games on Friday afternoon.
"We'll be notified in plenty of time and talk to other bodies involved and hopefully make the right decision for junior football in town."
Perilya's mine manager Andrew Lord yesterday said that the company had given a commitment that no action would be taken during the current season.
But he could not say what might happen beyond this year.
"There's no immediate plan to do anything with the ovals just as there's no plan to close the Zinc Lakes," he said.
But Perilya's managing director Paul Arndt has questioned the appropriateness of public facilities being supplied and maintained by a publicly listed company.
He told MP John Williams in a recent letter that maintaining the Zinc Lakes unfairly exposed shareholders to financial liability, and directors and officers to potential criminal sanctions.
City Council's general manager Frank Zaknich has said that any plan to transfer ownership of Perilya's assets to Council would need to include financial support.
Mr Lord said that he was confident any issues regarding transfer of ownership would eventually be worked out between the company and the three levels of government involved.
"I don't think there's anything for the city of Broken Hill to be concerned about," he said.
"We haven't sought to go around and create grief for everybody, quite the opposite.
"I'm optimistic the whole thing will sort itself out and don't for one minute think people will be disadvantaged."


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Sturt Park toilet plans well recieved

Originally published: Tuesday, 11th May, 2010

A grandmother has panned the idea but an information session yesterday failed to flush out any strident critics of a plan to build unisex toilets in Sturt Park.

 In fact, most of the handful of residents who turned up to yesterday morning's public information session at the Council Chambers appeared satisfied with the design of the new lavs.
 That was after staff from City Council assured the mostly female audience that the toilets, which will replace the existing concrete amenities, were designed to deter, not invite, sexual predators.
 Council's Shane Stenhouse said that, unlike the existing toilets which had many blind spots and were dark, the new ones were in plain view of people using the adjacent playground.
 That was important, he said, because an estimated 80 per cent of the people who now used the park were women and children.
 A local grandmother last week slammed the unisex design of the toilets, telling the BDT that they would put children at greater risk of being attacked.
 But yesterday's session was told that minimising crime was a key criteria of any new Council facility, and the toilets were based on Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) planning standards.
 A male resident questioned the size of the new facility, after learning it would provide the same number of adult toilets as the existing block, but without a urinal.
 "Do you think that will cater to Carols by Candlelight and other events," he said.
 In reply, Mr Stenhouse said that Council would have the option of adding portable toilets to the structure whenever large public events were held in the park.
 It was explained that unisex toilets offered greater flexibility over sex-specific toilets, particularly when there was one particular group, male or female, using the park.
 The new toilets, which Mr Stenhouse said could be up by the end of August and looked "much better in the flesh", include a disabled toilet and a child's toilet in a parent's room.
 The old toilet block will come down but Council has not yet decided whether to retain the outside walls which are covered with a mural.



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The Globe Timber Mill - An icon of business in the city

Originally published: Tuesday, 11th May, 2010

In the pioneer town of Broken Hill there was a great need for building timber and in some cases there was a requirement for lavish, hard to get overseas timber and panel wood for the use in the upper social set's new homes of elegance or in top quality hotels of renown.
The main quality timber merchant was the "Willyama" timber mill established around 1885/86.
It was owned by Thomas Stubbins, who would also open a yard in Flinders Street, Adelaide.
The business prospered very well and in 1887 Mr Stubbins needed a quality manager to take the business further, thus he employed Andrew Stenhouse, who came with extensive references and a long list of exceptional work in the timber industry.
Andrew was born in Scotland, and in 1862 at age 26 arrived in Melbourne.
There he got employment in contract rail, wharf and bridge building timber work for a period, before he set sail for New Zealand. For sixteen years he worked on various projects, including the building of the Cathedral in Christchurch. He then was offered the job of manager of the Union Sash and Door Company back in Melbourne.
It was at this time that Mr Thomas Stubbins learned of his long history in the industry; accordingly Stenhouse was invited to Broken Hill and took up the job as the supervisor at the "Willyama" steam saw mills in 1887.
Under this agreement the business really expanded and with Stenhouse's modern thinking and the use of the most up to date equipment available the firm was dealing in hundreds of tons of timber per month. As the town grew and the mines prospered so did the "Willyama" timber mill.
It is mentioned that around 1893 there were timber yards in Iodide Street and a large yard in Blende Street that covered a huge area of the Silverton Tramway siding with rail lines running through and around the mill, and the establishment was now named the Globe Timber Mills. Three years later the archives mention that in 1896 Mr Andrew Stenhouse JP is now the sole proprietor of the company.
In an advert in 1898, Globe mention that the Iodide and Blende Street yards are running at full capacity and that orders can be made on Telephone lines; number 17 in Iodide and 100 in Blende St.
By around 1900/1904 there were 120 men working for the Globe Timber Mills. It is a yardstick of the professional manner in which the business was being run under the leadership of Andrew Stenhouse, who had just opened a branch works in Port Pirie.
When holding their picnic days in the late 1890s and early 1900s, the Globe staff and families would gather at the racecourse to celebrate, and amazingly would fill the main grandstand in their finest picnic clothes.
The Globe was now importing galvanized iron in huge quantities and had the sole rights to sell the beautiful Wunderlich Ceiling tin panels. Andrew was also very committed to the community and was involved in the Masonic Lodge and at one time built a cottage, then presented it to the Broken Hill Cottage Homes Association as a gift.
His term as owner was paramount in its success over many decades and in 1906 the brilliant panorama photo of the Globe Timber Mills was produced, verifying its enormous size. The depiction reads; "The whole of the wood working machinery is under one giant roof, while a separate building takes care of the repair work and a complete fire service with hose and hydrants has been installed. A large dining room is available with heating apparatus for the comfort of all the workers, and twenty five horses are provided with good stables and feed near the blacksmith and wheelwright sheds".
Also it significantly held P.O. Box number 1. In the mist of time the Iodide yard slipped into history, but the property around Blende and Gossan remained a feature over the Silverton Tramway lines for many decades.
The First World War period was very hard, with so many young lads and men signing up for service over five long years. Nineteen men from Globe gave their lives in the war. The business had to rearrange its work schedules and get supplies of timber when possible.
It was dangerous work as well, with James Power being bitten by a redback spider and hospitalized in 1928.
Like other businesses it did survive and picked up well for just over a decade, but then the depression curtailed a lot of work and men were laid off. It was a very difficult time and as it got back on its feet in 1938/39 the worst news came over the wireless once more; "We are at war with Japan".
It created a very stressful time for all business houses and of course for our families once again, as our young men and many women were called into service of our nation.
Globe was instrumental in the building of a magnificent float of the destroyer "Sydney" which was used in a massive parade through the streets. It brought patriotic fervour to the city and above all else gave a boost to our moral in the most difficult of circumstances.
By 1949 the timber yard was back in full swing and benefited from the building boom that covered much of the South area well into the 1950s.
They advertised regularly in the BDT and modernized their equipment and carried a larger array of building materials and new products.
One old codger called Alby remembers the early days, with the giant round saw being used for cutting the mine timbers and wood sleepers for the railway.
"It was huge; you could hear it from many blocks away."
He continued, "A large number of men worked in the mill, it was very heavy work in those days, with tons of timber on carts or train wagons lined up ready to be cut in a cloud of saw dust."
The changes to the layout of the business came with the removal of the Silverton Tramway lines and a new configuration of the site. It was a hurdle that needed to be overcome, and in retrospect they did it very successfully as they entered the modern era of the seventies. A new corporate set up lay ahead.
In 1974 ownership of the Globe went to Gino and Vita La Rovere.                              
They have very successfully traded through the next 31 years, giving the optimum of service and supply to the community.
Today, the owner managers are Gino and Vita's daughter and son in-law, who have been in charge for the last five years. It has also weathered the storms of change during that time, including the economic upheavals and the building boom of two to three years ago.
Now there is a greater change in the wind, and a turning point in the history of Globe Timber Mills lies ahead.
It will surely persevere through these dramatic changes on site and no doubt remains a very much viable business in our community once more, with excellent service and array of timber requirements available.
One hundred and twenty years have past since the original wood yards supplied timber to our then pioneer town, and putting it into context, about 80 per cent of the buildings and most of the mines in this city would have Globe timber in them.
So much has changed in its corporate structure through those years but the Globe remains an icon of business in our city.

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Fantastic field days

Originally published: Monday, 10th May, 2010

Ideal weather conditions, recent rain and some star attractions combined to make the weekend's Agfair a huge success.

The event attracted about 11,000 people - 1,000 up of the 2008 fair - and Agfair chairman Kevin Taylor said stall holders were pleased with the crowds and their sales.
The results were excellent, he said.
"We noticed the numbers were well up on Friday (on the figures for the 2008), and that could be put down to the better conditions on the land."
He said the more positive feeling among graziers was probably the main contributor to the increase.
He agreed that the appearance of cricket-great Glenn McGrath at the Elders stand on Friday would also have been a big influence on the Friday attendances.
Mr Taylor said a good indicator of the more positive feelings were the sales of bulls at Agfair.
"A Santa Gertrudis breeder brought 11 bulls to the event and sold 12 by lunchtime on Friday.
"The cattle yards set up at Agfair were also sold by the end of the two days."
The entertainment was a big contributor, with the operator of the racing car simulator reporting 690 rides on Friday and over 1,000 on Saturday.
The Xtreme Trials motorcycle rider was also well received and celebrity chef Fast Ed packed out the Woolshed for each of his cooking demonstrations.

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Healthy win for Maari Ma

Originally published: Monday, 10th May, 2010

The local Maari Ma Health Aboriginal Corporation has won a national health award for its groundbreaking work in improving the health of Aboriginal children.

It was one of six organisations or individuals to receive an award at the inaugural Healthy for Life and New Directions Mothers and Babies Services Health Awards in Brisbane recently.
Maari Ma won in the category of "Organisational Contribution to Closing the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Outcomes" for their Healthy Start - Antenatal to Five Years program.
Federal Minister for Indigenous Health, Warren Snowdon, said the winners showed the innovation and leadership needed to address the Government's targets to close the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians.
Maari Ma's Chief Executive Officer, Bob Davis, said the award was a very welcome reward for much hard and innovative work.
"It is recognition of the direction Maari Ma's Board of Directors took five years ago, which was to centre Maari Ma's work around preventing chronic disease and taking an integrated, intersectoral and whole of life approach to improving the health of Aboriginal people," Mr Davis said.
"The foundations of many chronic diseases are laid down in utero and early childhood, most notably through low birth weight, growth retardation and repeated childhood infections."
He said the Healthy Start program was designed to encourage children and their families to choose healthier attitudes and habits and thereby reduce the incidence of lifestyle-related chronic diseases later in life.
"We have achieved a significant improvement in the health of children and mothers by engaging women during pregnancy and in the first five years of the child's life.
"Key to this is a schedule of more than 20 health or home visits during the child's first five years which is helping Aboriginal people to access culturally-appropriate health services and improve their health outcomes."
Mr Davis gave as an example the proportion of children who had their height and weight measured and development checks done on them.
He said this had increased from 39 per cent in 2006 to 54 per cent in 2008.
Mr Davis said Maari Ma has worked with a range of child health service providers to develop the program and continued to work with them.
"Child health service delivery is reviewed each year using continuous quality improvement and we have regular contact with other child health providers in the region such as The Broken Hill Health Service Child and Family Health Centre and the Royal Flying Doctor Service to assess improvements of child health.
"We will continue to build on the work we have done and to build positive relationships with families in the early years while children are well so that Aboriginal people in our region will enjoy the good health and longevity that non Aboriginal people enjoy," he said.

+ Read article

Praise for rescue "rookies"

Originally published: Monday, 10th May, 2010

The Perilya mine rescue team has competed in their first mine emergency response competition and arrived home successful.

Teams from mining companies throughout Victoria, SA and NSW pitted their mine rescue skills against each other in the inaugural SA Mines Emergency Response Competition.
It was held recently with the only team to represent NSW being Perilya. The team competed in eight components at the Angus Zinc Mine and Brukunga in Mount Barker.
These included fire fighting, rope rescue, first aid, search and rescue and road crash as well as a theory test and practical skills.
Each test was undertaken in a limited amount of time with a limited amount of equipment.
Perilya received the highest percentage in the road crash rescue component and their captain George Adams won the Captain's Trophy.
The boys said attending this comp had given them a lot of experience and had prepared them for accidents that could occur on the mine.
The mine rescue team is manned by volunteeers and trains once a month. They are all underground operators and consider themselves as rookies.

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Central demolish West

Originally published: Monday, 10th May, 2010

The above heading is nearly
the same as the first encounter
of the season between these
two teams. The only difference
is that on Saturday, West were
defeated by a further 43 points
with Central kicking 31-14 (200)
to West 2-2 (14).
It was a game which didn’t
reach great heights. As the score
indicates, it was all Central. They
had first use of the ball, three to
four players around a contest,
numerous goal kickers, did what
they wanted when they wanted,
and pushed the West players
aside on most occasions.
The only player that stood his
ground against bigger opponents
was the West dynamo Nick
Aguis. He was easily West’s best
with good skills and hard ball
wins.
John Blore, Darren Zanette
and Dion Ferguson were under
immense pressure all match and
tried their hardest.
Central just did what they
wanted with Jamie Berg kicking
seven goals, Brad Mannion, who
played half forward, kicking six
and dangerous forwards Wade
Gepp (2) and Ben Perkins (3)
adding to the tally.
Central are a very good side
but not unbeatable, as West
seemed to think. Central just
seemed to power on, whether
from Jackson McInnes, Justin
Heath or Brenton Zanette.
When West did go forward, if
the ball wasn’t delivered properly
to one particular forward he
refused to chase or even try to
get the ball back; you won’t win
games with this sort of attitude.
In the first half Central led by
66 points but the second quarter
was West’s best as they manned
up strongly in the backlines and
limited Central to 3-6.
But after half time it was all
Central. They kicked 21 goals
and it was mentioned that fillin
Manager Darren Larkin had
added something to their drinks.
In the second quarter Jamie
Berg kicked his first goal, adding
another six in the second half.
It was a just a complete
avalanche of goals by Central
who kicked them under very
little pressure and gave West no
chance of scoring.
Central will play North next
week. The Bulldogs will have
their backs against the wall after
their defeat by South, and we
know what a Bulldog is like
when he is cornered.
West need to keep trying to
improve in whatever way they
can
Score:
Central 7-2 10-8 19-11 31-14
(200)
West 0-1 0-2 1-2 2-2 (14)
Best Players:
Central - B Camilleri, J
McInnes, J Heath, B Mannion,
J Berg, J Paull, J Carapellotti, B
Zanette.
West - N Agius, J Blore, D
Zanette.
Goalkickers:
Central - J Berg 7, B Mannion
6, B Perkins 3, B Camilleri 3, J.
Mc Innes 3, W Gepp 2, J Keenan
2, J Carapellotti, J Paull, J Mc
Clure, B Zanette, M Goodlet.
West - B Malthouse, J Blore.
B Grade:
Central 14-13 d West 2-2.

+ Read article

Agfair begins today

Originally published: Friday, 7th May, 2010

 Thousands of country folk will flock to the racecourse where the region's largest agricultural field day begins today.

 After months of preparation, Agfair 2010 is open for business with more than 250 exhibitors peddling their wares or services during the two-day event.
 Everything from food and fashion to machinery and livestock is for sale.
 Celia Kurtzer and Robert Sullivan from Greenfields Merino and Poll Merino Stud have made the trip again.
 "It's good to come up while the country is looking so good," said Robert, who was setting up his display yesterday afternoon.
 Those not in a buying mood can always take a ride in a helicopter or a race car simulator, or attend one of the many activities scheduled throughout the event.

+ Read article

No easy task

Originally published: Friday, 7th May, 2010

City Council says any
plan to transfer Perilya’s
non-mining assets to the
community will need
to include government
financial support.
General Manager Frank
Zaknich yesterday said that
Perilya was in the process
of reviewing all of its nonmining
assets as part of a
plan to divest them.
The mining company
this week revealed that
it had offered to transfer
ownership of one of those
assets, Zinc Lakes, to
Council for $1.
Perilya’s managing
director Paul Arndt said the
offer was made as part of
discussions it had held with
Council about the present
ownership of the lakes and
Zinc Ovals.
In a letter to State MP
John Williams, Mr Arndt,
responding to fears the
lakes were about to close,
said the company had “no
fixed plan” to shut the lakes
or any other facility at this
stage.
But he outlined a number
of reasons why the company
might want to hand
over responsibility for the
lakes, including the legal
obligations associated with
giving the public access to
a park that is located within
a mining lease.
Mr Zaknich confirmed
Council had held talks
with Perilya “some time
ago” about the lakes, but
he said Perilya had at no
stage made a formal offer
to transfer ownership.
He said the company
owned and maintained a
range of facilities and any
proposal to transfer ownership
would need to be
looked at as a “whole package”.
“It’s a lot broader than
just the Zinc Lakes,” Mr
Zaknich said.
“We wouldn’t be looking
at one asset at a time
because we would be seeking
financial assistance.”
Any plan would need
to outline who was going
to be responsible for funding
the cost of transferring
the facilities over to public
ownership as well as maintenance.

+ Read article

Village not retired

Originally published: Friday, 7th May, 2010

Southern Cross Care
(SCC) says it hasn’t
given up on its plans to
build a retirement village
on the former St
Joseph’s High School
site in Lane Street.
But chief executive
Allan Carter yesterday
said that the project was
now “back to the blank
paper stage” because the
present concept was economically
unviable.
SCC’s proposal
involved putting 24 units
on the Lane Street site
to help meet a shortage
in retirement living-style
accommodation in Broken
Hill.
The aged care provider
has an option to lease
or buy the site from the
Catholic Church.
But the plans were
shelved due to the large
amount of civil works
required on the site to
accommodate the units on
“three or four different
levels”.
Mr Carter said that the
high cost of the initial
development work meant
that SCC couldn’t put the
units on the ground at an
affordable price.
Reducing the number
of units also made the
project economically
unviable.
“The high school site
is on hold,” he said.
“We certainly haven’t
given up on the site but
our original plans don’t
work.”
Despite the setback,
SCC yesterday revealed
it had plans for another,
smaller retirement living
development close to the
school site.
Mr Carter said SCC
may build up to six units
on a residential block it
owns behind the school in
Chapple Street.
He said that its bought
the block around the time
it began working on the St
Joseph’s site, with a view
to developing both sites
as a single project.
Now SCC is investigating
the feasibility of
developing the Chapple
Street site on its own,
with the option of joining
it with any future St
Joseph’s project.
“We’re reasonably confident
we could make
it stand alone with six
units,” Mr Carter said.
He said SCC had
invested a considerable
amount of money on the
St Joseph’s site and had
not yet given up on it.
“We like the site ... it’s
just a difficult site.
“We’ve done a fair
bit of work on that site
so we’d like to continue
there.”
SCC’s major focus
now, however, was completion
of the new Harold
Williams Home in Eyre
Street and changing the
use of the War Veterans’
Hostel.
“They’re our focus at
the moment,” Mr Carter
said.
While the Harold
Williams Home was “a
little behind schedule”,
Mr Carter said SCC was
still confident it would
be occupied by the end of
the year.
He expected the current
War Veterans’ hostel
to be turned into a
retirement village within
three months of it being
vacated by residents.
“By the middle of next
year we’d hope to have
finished both projects.”

+ Read article

Lakes on offer

Originally published: Thursday, 6th May, 2010

Perilya has offered to give the Zinc Lakes to
City Council for a dollar
and says the public will
continue to have access
to the lakes for the near
future.
Local MP John Williams
yesterday received a
response from Perilya to a
letter he wrote to the mining
company about community
concerns about the
future of the “twin lakes”.
“I am grateful for
Perilya’s prompt response
and can assure them the
people of Broken Hill will
continue to value their
access to this great facility,”
Mr Williams said.
The Member for Murray-
Darling said Perilya, who
now own the lakes, told him
that it had no immediate
plans to restrict community
access to the site and that
they had offered to give
the lakes to City Council
for $1.00.
Following is the text of
the letter received by Mr
Williams yesterday:
“Dear Mr Williams, We
refer to your letter dated
16th April, 2010 and
respond as follows:
“We agree with many of
the comments in your letter
and consider that the Zinc
Lakes is an important recreation
facility for the community
of Broken Hill.
“We do however question
that such facilities
are correctly supplied and
maintained by a publicly
listed company.
“Discussions and correspondence
regarding
the present ownership and
future position of the Zinc
Lakes and Zinc Ovals have
been ongoing with the
Broken Hill City Council
since the release of the
BHCC’s ‘plan of management
for open space’
in 2009. As part of these
discussions, Perilya has
offered to transfer the ownership
of the Zinc Lakes to
BHCC for $1.00.
“Recent events surrounding
the proposed heritage
listing of the City of Broken
Hill have reinvigorated discussions
(at state, federal
and local government levels)
around the eventual
ownership of a number of
Perilya assets. These discussions
are ongoing.
“While there have been
no incidents that have highlighted
issues of public
safety, there have been a
number of near misses that
have raised awareness of
exposure to Perilya. Again
these issues have been
raised with local government
and elicited no support.
“Your letter does not
recognise the legal obligations
that is shouldered by
Perilya, its directors and its
officers while our organization
continues to provide
and maintain the Zinc
Lakes’ facilities. As you
will be aware, the obligations
in NSW are particularly
severe and the advice
we have received verbally
from the Department of
Primary Industries is that
the provision of public open
space is not appropriate for
a mining tenement.

+ Read article

Price rise petition

Originally published: Thursday, 6th May, 2010

Local residents are
being urged to sign a
petition urging the State
Government to scale
back its enormous electricity
price rises.
The petition comes as
prices are set to rise by
around 42 per cent over
the next three years to help
pay for network upgrades
and expansions.
The increase will see
Country Energy customers
paying an extra $918 per
year by 2013 for their
electricity.
The rise will force more
people to go without basic
necessities and lead to an
increase in the homeless
rate, according to State
MP John Williams.
Local resident Phyl
Trevilyan agreed.
The pensioner said that
while she would struggle
to pay the extra cost, she
felt sorry for those who
were in an even worse
financial position.
“There’s a lot of elderly
people that won’t be able
to afford it,” she said.
“I feel sorry for pensioners
who don’t really
have anything.”
Mr Williams, who has
launched the petition, said
the NSW Government
approved the increase
despite knowing it would
hurt the most vulnerable.
“This is bad news for
those who are already
struggling to afford basic
utilities and cannot afford
even a small increase in
their electricity, gas or
water bill,” he said.
“The number of pensioners,
small businesses,
landholders, families and
low income earners who
are vulnerable will
increase significantly, and
the number of people
going without basics such
as medication, heating,
cooling and even food, is
going to increase dramatically.
“This is an issue of
major concern, particularly
for residents relying on
an aged pension who
require medication and are
struggling to exist on what
they currently receive.”
Mr Williams said the
number of homeless people
in NSW would
increase as a result of the
rise.
“2006 data shows there
were more than 27,000
homeless NSW residents
with 632 homeless residents
in the Southern side
of the Murray-Darling
electorate and 185 residents
from the Northern
side of the Murray-
Darling electorate.
“While the Murray-
Darling electorate is large,
we make up less than 0.5
per cent of the NSW population
yet hold more than
3 per cent of the State’s
homeless and this number
will increase as more and
more individuals simply
can not afford rent, food or
utilities.
“Even the charities that
assist the vulnerable will
be hit hard by the increase
because they already
struggle to support those
in need and the number of
people needing assistance
will increase significantly
as a result of this electricity
increase.”
Mr Williams urged all
locals to show their support
and sign the petition,
which has been circulated
across the electorate
including Council and
Shire offices.
“We request that the
NSW Government reverse
the approval to increase
electricity costs and we
demand IPART review
these increases to electricity
prices so they are more
realistic.”
Copies of the petition
are available at Mr
Williams’ office in
Bromide Street, and any
individuals or groups who
wish to help collect signatures
may contact his
office on (08) 80873315.

+ Read article

New staff cut wait for speech pathology

Originally published: Thursday, 6th May, 2010

Waiting lists for speech pathology services at
the hospital have been cut after the appointment
of new staff.
Broken Hill Health Service General Manager, Rod
Wyber-Hughes, described the development as an
“exciting result for the Broken Hill community.”
One of several things that enabled the hospital to cut
waiting lists was the appointment six months ago of a
Speech Pathologist/Manager, Diena Grant-Thomson.
Ms Grant-Thomson said that speech pathology
“stays with people for their entire life.”
She also emphasises the importance of early
intervention and says that there are also no age barriers
for this kind of treatment.
Children up to the age of 16 and adults can attend
the therapy which Dawn Myree, a senior speech
pathologist, said was “critical to being able to read and
write and improve people’s literacy skills.”
Newly-appointed part-time speech pathologist, Erin
Wilkins, said that unchecked speech problems limited
a child’s education.
“A child with speech or language difficulties prior
to school is four to five times more likely to encounter
reading and spelling difficulties when they go to
school,” she said.
The speech pathology service at the hospital also
helps people who have suffered strokes, brain injury
or Parkinson’s disease get back to a normal speech
pattern.

+ Read article

Perilya Silent

Originally published: Wednesday, 5th May, 2010

Perilya still won’t say
anything about the future of
the Zinc Lakes. Yesterday
the Mayor joined local MP
John Williams and 1,700
locals in a call for clarity.
While on a media
assignment yesterday,
one of Perilya’s managers
told staff from the Barrier
Daily Truth that the future
of the lakes had nothing
to do with the BDT and
that it was none of our
business.
Perilya’s comments
came following a number
of articles in the BDT
regarding concern from
residents about the future
of the lakes, which are a
popular spot for families,
weddings and days out.

+ Read article

Film studio a world first: MacDonald

Originally published: Wednesday, 5th May, 2010

The world’s first
desert film studio will
pump tens of millions
of dollars and hundreds
of jobs into the local
economy, according to
a NSW Government
Minister.
Earmarked for development
at the old power
station site on Eyre Street,
the Broken Hill Film
Studio could create more
than 1,000 new jobs and
put around $44 million
into the region’s economy.
In the city yesterday to
promote the studio that
the NSW Government will
contribute $1 million to,
the Minister for State and
Regional Development,
Ian Macdonald, said it
would be a world first
and a terrific boost to the
region.
“We believe it will be
the only global desert studio
in the world,” Minister
Macdonald said yesterday.
“We believe it could be,
over the next five years,
a $44 million economic
boost to the region. A lot
of jobs will be created
- 570 each year for two
years.”
Mr Macdonald said
he had been in discussions
with a number of
film makers who had
expressed interest in the
proposed studio.
“I’ve been working with
KMM (Kennedy Miller
Mitchell) for some time
including with Happy
Feet and on Fury Road,”
he said.
“We have been discussing
with them their keenness
to go to Broken Hill
and (the use) of this power
station.

+ Read article

City a good model: Cuy

Originally published: Wednesday, 5th May, 2010

Broken Hill was being
used by other towns as a
case study in economic
diversification, according
to mayor Wincen
Cuy.
While attending the
Community Economic
Development Conference,
which began in the city
yesterday, Mayor Cuy
said the city’s economic
diversification was a
good model for other
communities to follow.
“They are taking us as
a case model. We have
art, film, mining and
we’re even diversifying
into renewable (energy),”
Mayor Cuy said.
“But (the conference)
also gives us a chance
to learn how to manage
economic change for the
future.”
More than 270 delegates
from around NSW have
descended on the city for
the three-day conference
where the changing
economic, cultural and
environmental factors
affecting communities in
NSW will be discussed.
Opening the event, the
NSW Minister for State and
Regional Development, Ian
Macdonald, acknowledged
the city’s liveability, the
rich mining knowledge
and unique geographical
and elemental factors, and
said it was a perfect choice
for the conference.
“The city has a long
mining history and a
thriving artistic and
Indigenous community
and has a fast growing
tourism industry.”
The conference includes
discussions on business
trends, attracting new
residents and positive
communication.
Mr Cuy said the event
would not only share
knowledge and ideas, but
would pump hundreds of
thousands of dollars into
the economy and promote
the city through word of
mouth.
“It’s great for the
economy. The minister
estimates that between
$150,000 and $170,000
will go to the Broken Hill
economy in the next few
days,” Mr Cuy said.
“But more important,
and importantly long term,
people will be talking
about our city - that is
just as important as capital
input.”
Mr Cuy said he was
approached on Monday
by a 70-year-old man who
said he had always wanted
to visit Broken Hill.
“He said to me ‘I’ve
been walking all around
the town and I love it. I
called my wife and said
we’re coming to Broken
Hill for a week’.
“He said ‘you’ve looked
after this city’.

+ Read article

Little impact on local miners: Williams

Originally published: Tuesday, 4th May, 2010

A big tax on miners and a huge infrastructure fund would have little impact locally, according to the Member for Murray-Darling.
John Williams said he expected a 40 per cent super tax on mining companies
to have little impact
on the city and that a State
infrastructure fund built
from that tax would have
an equally limited impact.
“The way I see it I
don’t think this tax will
impact on our local miners
because they’re not in that
category to get the super
taxes,” Mr Williams said.
“It’s aimed fairly and
squarely at those companies
who are (engaged) in
huge profit taking and I
don’t think we fall into
that category.”
Mr Williams’ comments
come following an
announcement by Prime
Minister Kevin Rudd on
Sunday that he would take
one of the recommendations
from the Henry tax
review and create a super
tax on miners.
The Resources Super
Profit Tax would see big
mining companies pay the
Federal Government 40
per cent of their profits,
after exploration and capital
expenditure costs.
The tax will reap $3 billion
in 2012-13 and will
pump $9 billion per year
into the government’s coffers
by 2013-14.
The money would be
used to reduce tax on businesses,
to increase compulsory
superannuation
payments and to pay for
an infrastructure fund to
be used by the states.
But Mr Williams said
it was unlikely the city
would see much of that
fund, expected to be $700
million by 2012, unless
it adopted a scheme like
the one used in Western
Australia where 25 per
cent of its mining and offshore
petroleum royalties
are directed back to country
areas.
“The only way we could
guarantee a fair share is
to adopt a Royalties for
Regions program like they
did in WA.”
Mr Williams said state
governments were historically
underfunded and that
the new infrastructure fund
would only be as good as
those who managed the
millions they got.
But he said any new
money would be welcome
and he has local road
projects in his sights.
“Obviously there’s
demand for more infrastructure
and not enough
money,” he said.
“The fact is it’s down to
NSW to manage the revenue
because as we know
people who can’t manage
money no matter how
much they’ve got there’s
never enough.
“There’s no doubt (an
infrastructure fund would
help and) ... the completion
of the Silver City
Highway is an absolutely
priority.”
While Mr Williams did
not say he supported the
tax, he did say there was
only one chance to reap
what the mining boom was
sowing.
“I guess when you start
thinking of the amount of
income out of Australia
that goes to overseas companies
you’ve only got one
opportunity to get some
benefit,” he said
“Some of those profits
should come back.”
Mr Williams said a cut
in business tax from 30 to
28 per cent was welcomed
but would be all but taken
up by extra superannuation
contributions - rising
in increments from nine
per cent to 12 per cent by
2020.
“While it’s great for the
workers, small businesses
especially (will feel the
pinch),” he said.
“Small business will get
a tax rebate but ... it’s give
in one hand, take with the
other.
“That in my mind
doesn’t produce the true
tax relief.”

+ Read article

Mother's Day stall on the move

Originally published: Tuesday, 4th May, 2010

The Broken Hill Floral Art Club will be holding its Mother’s Day stall at a new spot this year.The club’s biggest fundraiser will be held on Saturday at Centro Westside from 8am.
The venue change is due
to the community markets,
which is usually where the
stall is held, being postponed
until May 15.
The Floral Art Club’s
secretary Barb Gray said
that there were a very
good variety of colours
and styles in silk and fresh
arrangements.
Prices for flowers start
at $5.
Ms Gray said the club
also welcomed new members.
Anyone who is interested
in joining The Broken
Hill Floral Art Club may
phone either 8088 2417 or
8087 6269.

+ Read article

Police on the trail of teenage burglars

Originally published: Tuesday, 4th May, 2010

Police have been
given a description of
two burglars who broke
into a house in Rowe
Street on Sunday morning.
The burglary was one
of four committed over
the weekend, police said
yesterday.
Neighbouring houses
at the northern end of
Beryl Street and two in
Railwaytown were broken
into, they said.
In Rowe Street, the
owner of the house went
out about 11am, leaving
his back door unlocked,
and returned home 15
minutes later to find two
teenage boys inside.
Police said they fled
out the back door with a
digital camera they had
stolen and that the owner
gave chase but lost sight
of them.
He told police that one
of the thieves was about
14 to 15 years old with
fair skin and blonde, curly
hair while the other was
Aboriginal with short dark
hair and about 15 or 16
years old.
Also on Sunday a home
in Wills Street was broken
into while the owner was
attending church, police
said.
The house was entered
through the front door, a
bedroom ransacked and all
the other rooms showed
signs of disturbance, they
said.
The break-in was
committed between
8.30am and 11am and it
was not yet known what, if
anything, had been stolen,
police said.
In Beryl Street on
Sunday thieves smashed
a back window to break
into a house and ransack
the place while the owners
were away.
This happened some
time between 1.30pm and
2pm.
Police said it was yet to
be determined if anything
was missing but that about
$2,000 worth of property
had been stolen from the
house next door earlier in
the day or overnight.
Thieves broke in through
the back window sometime
after 10pm Saturday
and, after ransacking the
house, escaped with cash,
alcoholic drinks, a digital
camera and a luggage
bag.
The theft was discovered
about 11am on Sunday.

+ Read article

“Happy campers” set up on Holten Drive

Originally published: Tuesday, 4th May, 2010

Two “happy campers”
have been spotted
out near the Menindee
road, but their creators
are not the usual suspects.
It looked like the work
of The Phantom Gorilla
Artists, who have created
such displays as the Easter
Bunny on the Line of Lode
and the UFO near the airport.
But the artists said yesterday
that the two “campers”,
constructed out of
wire, buckets and support
poles, were not their creations.
A spokesman for the
Phantom Artists said
that although they were
not responsible this time,
they were nonetheless
“encouraging other people
to construct these displays
around town.”
The two figures, who
have been dubbed the
“happy campers”, can be
seen amongst the trees
on Holten Drive near the
Menindee road.

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Locals get a lot out of trials

Originally published: Tuesday, 4th May, 2010

The Rebels and
Stingrays spent last
week at St Ignatius
College, Riverview
playing in the Under-15
and Under-16 Joss State
Zone Trials.
Both teams played
gallantly throughout
the course of the week
with a number of players
impressing on the field
and others getting a taste
of AFL at another level.
AFL (NSW/ACT) State
Talent Manager said all
players came to the trials
determined to get the most
out of the week.
“The week was
everything we expected
plus more. The standard of
play matched the standard
of player preparation,
recovery and behavior. It
all sits well for where the
program is heading,” he
said.
Fourteen teams came to
Riverview and played in 42
games. The week offered
kids the perfect platform
to show their talents in
front of AFL scouts and
experienced coaches.
With former Carlton
player Nick Stevens joining
the Under-16 RAMS
as an assistant coach,
and dual All-Australia
Rohan Smith coaching
the Under-18 RAMS, the
Talented Player Program
is providing players with
a system to make it on to
AFL lists.
Throughout the week
they were given a rare
insight into the life of an
AFL player and attended
sessions on nutrition,
conditioning, stretching,
stability, umpiring and
what’s expected at the
state level.
Doug Freeman, NSW
talent scout with the
Essendon Bombers, said
there were many benefits
to being a part of the
Talented Player Program.
“To give kids in NSW
a bigger opportunity, the
program is the right way
to go. It’s the right track to
go down to encourage kids
to play the game and to get
top of the line coaching
for 30 to 40 weeks of the
year, which is going to be
a benefit.
“It also means the kids
might not have to travel
out of the state hopefully
and they can now get on
Swans and Team GWS
lists, not that we wouldn’t
mind a few kids. If they
don’t want some, we
will definitely be around
looking to snaffle them
somewhere.”

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Silverlea's golden celebration

Originally published: Monday, 3rd May, 2010

The Silverlea group of disability services is celebrating 50 years of commitment to Broken Hill this year.

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Local golfers a big hit

Originally published: Saturday, 1st May, 2010

Broken Hill golfers
proved they where the
best in three states yesterday
by taking out
first place and runners
up in the West Darling
Ladies Foursome.
Golfers from Victoria,
South Australia and NSW
took part with 46 women
taking to the course.
Locals Judy Edgecumbe
and Gaynor Holliday
paired up to get a score of
92 to win the day, while
teenager Jacqui Walter
paired with Anne Sawzcak
and finished runners up on
94.
Red Cliffs took out both
the nett winner and runner
up positions with Sandra
Morwood and Sue Kircher
winning on 64. Chris
Taylor and Faye Englefield
were runners up.
Broken Hill ladies captain
Lyn Mayne said the
locals were a talented lot.
“Jacqui Walter is only a
teenager and she paired
well with Anne to take out
the gross runner up,” Ms
Mayne said.
“It was a good day, they
had a good score and the
ground was great.
“The girls enjoyed
themselves rather than getting
a good score and came
in with a 92 off the stick.
The girls from away came
in and won the nett.”
Today the ladies will
compete in a 27 hole competition
while tomorrow
there will be a Canadian
mixed foursomes.

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