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News archive

This is an archive containing every news story ever posted on the BDT website. If you’re looking for a specific article, try the search box at the top right hand side of this page. Otherwise you can just browse the archive by selecting a year and month below.

June, 2010

Cold weather no problem

Originally published: Wednesday, 30th June, 2010

The recent cold weather would be enough to keep most travellers indoors, but it hasn't been a problem for the Bloch family from Melbourne.

Despite yesterday's maximum reaching just 13 degrees, Adrian and Kylie Bloch and their children were rugged up and visiting a number of the city's sites including the Miners' Memorial and the sculptures.
"It's been fantastic so far, even though it has been very cold," said Mrs Bloch.
"But it's not too different to what we get in Melbourne."
The family are visiting the city as part of a trip that will take them through Innamincka and the Flinders Ranges, and said they have found their stay enjoyable.
"We've only been in town since yesterday but we've had a chance to have a good look around and we'll be going out to the sculptures next," said Mrs Bloch.
"There's a lot of fabulous architecture - wonderful old buildings that have been preserved, the wide streets - the city has kept a lot of its past mining history.
"We came here once before and visited all the galleries. That was probably around ten years ago, and we hope to come back again.
"It really is a wonderful place to come and visit, it's very unique. And we've met a lot of great people, everyone has been really helpful and hospitable."
Locals and visitors alike can expect more cold weather in the coming week, with temperatures set to drop as low as five degrees tomorrow and rain forecast for Friday.

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Broken Hill released soon

Originally published: Wednesday, 30th June, 2010

A film shot in the city two years ago is set to be launched in September.

"Broken Hill" was shot in and around the city and interstate will open in 300 theatres around Australia in the first week of the month.
After extensive negotiations, the movie has been selected as the inaugural film for a major new national educational initiative in Australia aimed at schools, families and communities. The details of this will be announced next month.
"Broken Hill" follows the story of teenage composer Tommy, who lives on a sheep station with his father and dreams of getting into the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.
Producer Chris Wyatt said the film has similarities to "Billy Elliot" and has a "School of Rock" component to it.
A range of Australian talent is also seen in "Broken Hill". Tommy is played by actor Luke Arnold (McLeod's Daughters) and Rhys Wakefield has been cast as Tommy's best friend, Scott. Rhys is recognisable from his role in Home and Away.
Tommy's love interest, the role of American teenager Kat, was given to American star Alexa Vega who stars in the Spy Kids films.

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Rainwater a lifeline for washing day

Originally published: Wednesday, 30th June, 2010

Lifeline will use a government grant to install a large rainwater tank in the back yard of its Argent Street shop.

Its manager, Richard Lines, said they had found just the right spot because  there was a lot of roofing on the storage sheds for the run-off.
Mr Lines said that the rainwater would be used to wash donated clothes and for all the sinks.
"The toilets from the shop will also be plumbed," he said.
The money for the work will come from the NSW Government.
The Minister for Climate Change and the Environment, Frank Sartor, yesterday announced $887,589 for 39 projects around the State.
"Each facility will receive funding to cover the costs of simple, effective upgrades such as lighting retrofits, installing rainwater tanks, replacing electric with solar hot water and installing dual-flush toilets with water efficient fixtures," Mr Sartor said.
"They include upgrades in preschools, early childhood centres, clubs, aged care facilities and neighbourhood centres all across NSW."
The projects are all in facilities used by not-for-profit groups who all have a very important role in their communities, Mr Sartor said.
"By demonstrating the simple and practical ways we can all save water and energy, these projects have a crucial multiplier effect to encourage further savings among the facility users."

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Tight contest predicted in KO Cup finals tonight

Originally published: Wednesday, 30th June, 2010

The KO Cup finals will be staged tonight at 6.30pm at the Soccer Grounds. With the World Cup fever building the locals will be out to grab the silverware tonight.

In the MEN'S A-GRADE final Alma defeated Celtic to advance whilst St Josephs defeated perennial favourites West last Wednesday to advance.
In their two meetings this year, Round 3 was a 1-1 draw whilst in round 6 St Josephs prevailed 2-0. These stats point to a very close match with the team that takes their chances most likely to be holding the Cup at 10pm tonight.
Last week St Josephs had several red hot chances to score a comfortable win but sprayed their shots wide, and a repeat performance will open the door for Alma who have three kick strikers in Dale Dowling, Wayne VanKemenade and Tristian Symonds ready to pounce.
Alma has a brilliant back four led by Daniel McInerney and Laurence Hebbard whilst Hayden Lyall is rapidly improving as a fearless keeper. Alma will be relying on its four juniors Ned Pollitt, Sam Lines, Codey Ralph and Thomas Barlow to stamp their class on this match.  
For the double blues they were back to their best against West with a powerful hard running game which they backed up on Sunday with a 7-1 win over Celtic.
The return of Dylan Trebilcock as sweeper has allowed Justin Ellice to move to left back and use his strong running game to good effect. Stars from last week, Jyh Stubing and Ashley Christos, have given the Blues some extra midfield strength whilst their trump card could well be veteran Jimmy Wilkins who has a great turn of speed to unsettle the Alma defence.
Looking for the X factor it could well come from Bryce Bessell who returned to his brilliant best last Sunday with numerous perfect crosses that resulted in several Joey goals.
Prediction: St Josephs to retain its 2009 Cup with a 2-1 win
In the MEN'S B GRADE final Alma and St Josephs clash again and this game also promises to be very close based on 2010 form.
In round 3 Alma won 4-3 and in round 4 St Josephs won 4-1. A closer look points to most of the goals being scored by players now only playing in the A grade game, so both clubs start even money for tonight's Cup decider.
St Josephs have the veterans in playing Coach Ray Christos and Tony Robins to set up the game plan whilst the McDonald boys, Adrian and Joseph, have many years of A grade experience also to bring to the table. Throw in a four goal performance from Joseph Bennett last weekend, the pace of Michael Spencer down the left and the brilliance of 15-year-old Rylie McInnes down the right and the Blues will be quietly confident.
The major worry for Alma will be Barry Balman who scored in the KO Cup qualifier. In goals Clint Pearce was very solid last week and will need to be on his game again to keep Alma out. The quiet achievers for St Josephs, Jake Picton, Julian Mann and Sam Muscat make up a very reliable defence that is anchored by Lukas Muscat, who at just 17 displays remarkable calmness as sweeper.
Alma will turn to veterans Tom Lyle, Jorge Oviedo, Mark Halliday and Stuart Brain to organise its younger players. Andrew Henry and Lyle scored in their 3-2 win over Celtic to qualify for the final.
On that night Alma started short on players but will be ready this week and have both Nathan Harvey and Harley Rawle available as goalies. William Hebbard, the A grade coach, will be a key player in defence for Alma and will be looking for strong support from Jarrad Hurley and Keradyn Turley to turn this game Alma's way.
Prediction: St Josephs 3-1.
The LADIES final promises to be a classic contest at 6.45pm between the Celtic Cougars and the West Panthers.
Celtic have had wins in both games 4-3 and 5-0 but West did get to half time at nil all before Elle Gepp scored five times in the 2nd half of that game.
Expect West Coach George Bugeja to have a plan hatched for Gepp, but he also needs one for Amee Hogarth who is in career best form for Celtic and Gemma Varcoe who can be lethal down the right.  Add the class of Millicent and Annabelle Walker and Celtic hold plenty of aces.
Celtic's defence is also first class with Jo Smith brilliant last weekend at right back and Narelle Crabb equally impressive at left back. Add the class and experience of Jacquie Passlow, Rachael Wheatley and Giuliana Passlow and with three keepers to choose from its hard to see Celtic not going back to back in the Ladies KO Cup.
West will make a huge contest of this game with Jasmine Mitchell back scoring goals every week and Linda Bugeja also a regular goal scorer. West's strength all season has been its defence where Stacey Carter-Ray and Logan Cooper have been outstanding along with Tania Roberts and Shae Neville in goals.
This will be a quick game and could get very physical given the experience of players on both teams so patrons need to get their seats reserved early for this epic.
Prediction: Celtic 2-1.
Canteen facilities will be available, entry is just $3, and a reminder that no alcohol will be allowed into the venue. Jumpers, rugs and beanies will be all the go and, yes, you can leave them noisy horn things home! 

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Art message

Originally published: Tuesday, 29th June, 2010

Maari Ma Health is holding an art competition to let people know about the danger of alcohol and drug abuse.

Artists have four weeks to get their entry in to the $1,000 Indigenous art competition which opened this month.
There are three prizes. First prize is a $550 gift voucher from Leading Edge Computers and Electronics. Second prize is a $300 Big W voucher and the third prize is a $150 voucher from Outback Artz and Crafts.
Lisa Kickett, an Aboriginal Mental Health trainee at Maari Ma, said the winners will have their work printed on drug and alcohol information booklets meant for Aboriginal communities.
The competition is open to anyone in Wilcannia, Menindee and Broken Hill and there is no age limit.
Ms Kickett said competition would let people know about drug and alcohol services and the help that is available.
"People can learn more about Maari Ma's services and where to get help," she said.
"The competition will hopefully draw people in and get the community involved."
Ms Kickett is encouraging local participation and is hoping to see lots of entries.
Entries must include full name and contact details on the back of artwork.

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Silverton explained

Originally published: Tuesday, 29th June, 2010

Silverton's village committee has already begun to put up the signs which use historic photos and information to explain the history of Silverton and its people.
Committee secretary Helen Murray said the signs would be supported by a new brochure which would make it easier for visitors to access all the history and information on the attractions the area has to offer.
"It has taken some months to complete the signs, with Heritage Advisor Ron Hellyer guiding the Silverton Village Committee on colours and text and coming up with the final design," she said.
The signs were funded by a $30,000 grant from the Commonwealth Government's Regional and Local Community Infrastructure Program (RLCIP).
Ms Murray said that while the signs showed the history of particular buildings and sites, they were just the first stage of a major project.
A series of story boards and a town map would soon be attached to a shade area at the rear of the Municipal Chambers so visitors can read the Silverton story and plan their tour of the area.
The committee has also appointed a Maintenance Coordinator as a result of the projects it has been able to complete through the RLCIP packages.
Victorian couple Alan and Linda Moloney were the first people to put Silverton's new interpretive signs to the test on Friday.
The Golden Beach couple arrived at Silverton just as Heritage Advisor Ron Hellyer and Ms Murray were installing the first of the signs.
The couple gave the signs the thumbs up and thought they would be a great idea for their home town.

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Kicking in for charity

Originally published: Tuesday, 29th June, 2010

Sixteen teams will battle it out for charity tonight in the WHK-BDT Charity Cup.

The fun-focussed soccer competition has been called as a way of celebrating the World Cup andhelping charities.
A range of workplaces have signed up, with teams hailing from schools, the RSPCA, banks, the Flying Doctors and all over the city.
Each team will play two games tonight at the soccer grounds, with the high scorers moving through to a final. Prize money will be awarded to a local charity of the winning team's choice.
WHK and the BDT have chipped in to start a $500 prize pot, with nomination fees from each team adding to that total.
Entry to tonight's tussle is free, but a donation bucket will be passed around, and those proceeds will also go to the winning charity.
WHK planned the event as a fun night with workmates to get into the World Cup spirit and raise money for a good cause.
Tonight's teams have been divided into two groups of eight. Group one's games kick off at 6pm and group two's at 6.40pm.
All games will start at the same time so players are asked to be prompt.
The emphasis is on a good time. Matches will be played on half fields and last 30 minutes. Unlimited substitutions are allowed with no offside rule or referees.
Hot food and drink will be available from the canteen.
For more information contact WHK on 8088 5011.
The draw for the first round of matches is below.

Group One - 6pm kick off.
The Referees v The Arsonists
Shinglebacks v Transformers
The Teachers v ANZ
Torpy's Ripcurl Ring Ins v The Base Unit.

Group two - 6.40pm kick-off
WHK United v BDTeam
Sampson's Misfits v UDRH Family
Morgie Milan FC v Palace Queenies
Central Strikers v BH TAFE

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Students face the future

Originally published: Monday, 28th June, 2010

High school students were learning about careers at West State Training's Careers Expo yesterday.

West State Training held the Expo for students in Years 9, 10, 11 and 12.
Students from Broken Hill High School, Willyama High School and Wilcannia Central School attended the Expo at the Memorial Oval.
Co-ordinator, Helen Sims, said it offered a great opportunity for students to gain information from local and visiting industry representatives as well as further education providers.
A range of employers were there including mining companies, health services, universities and TAFE, education services, emergency services and employment agencies.
Students were encouraged to discuss jobs, traineeships, apprenticeships, cadetships, course requirements, enrolments and scholarships.
The Career Expo is an informal affair where students can talk with the representatives of their choice.
Helen Sims said that she received a great response from local and visiting people.
"Some of our exhibitors will be visiting from Adelaide and regional NSW with over 50 in total," she said.
"A lot of industry people recognise the need to promote their industry and plant the seeds so as to encourage new blood as many industries have an ageing work force."
About 600 students attended, Mrs Sims said, and apart for the weather the day went pretty well.
"The rain was a drama but the kids were well-behaved," she said.
"The kids were enthusiastic and got involved and asked questions."

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Art show is a lifeline for counselling services

Originally published: Monday, 28th June, 2010

Lifeline's 21st annual art exhibition opened last night with more than 40 artists showing their works to invited guests.

Fundraising officer Trevor Odgers said at last year's art show about a third of the works sold and that Lifeline was hoping to do at least as good this time.
The exhibition offers up and coming artists the chance to hang their work among those of the more established names.
"It's a major fundraiser for Lifeline services which is a 24-hour seven day a week counselling service," said Mr Odgers.
This year 119 works are being shown by 43 local artists including Sue Coffey, Diedre Edwards, Robert Groves and Colin Radford.
The show will run until Sunday, July 11 at the Albert Kersten Mining and Mineral Museum. Entry is free entry for locals.
Opening hours are from 10am to 5pm weekdays and 1pm-5pm on weekends.

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Wrapped in donation

Originally published: Monday, 28th June, 2010

A local group of ex-service men have donated linen to St Vincent de Paul's Winter Appeal.

The Australian Legion of Ex-Service Men and Women Broken Hill sub-branch donated $500 worth of bed sheets and pillow slips to St Vinnies local branch.
"We do this every year, we give them 'x' amount of dollars worth of goods, usually to the value of $500 a couple of times a year," Legion president Bill Graham said.
Regional president of Vinnies, Phil Sky, said he was thankful for the many donations that had been made.
"We wish to thank the Legion of ex-service men and women for their donation in excess of $500 of linen which will be of great use to complement our blanket appeal and to be used in helping out our clients," Mr Sky said.
He also thanked the public and other clubs and service clubs for their generous donations and told people to "keep them coming!"
Mr Sky said that Vinnies also needed pots and pans for their many clients.
"Anybody having a cupboard full of these items may like to dispose of them by donating good quality saucepans and fry pans to help out with our clients."
He said that they may be dropped off to the Vinnies shop in Argent Street.

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Hard work pays off

Originally published: Monday, 28th June, 2010

Hours of training and travel have paid off for basketballer Heath Harris after he was selected to compete at the Australian Junior Championships.

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Red Nose Day

Originally published: Friday, 25th June, 2010

Locals will be looking a little red around the nose today when they come out to do their bit in the fight against Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Red Nose Day, which is charity "Sids for Kids" major fundraiser, has helped cut the rate of SIDS deaths by 85 per cent over the last 20-odd years.
Now nine children under the age of four die every day from SIDS, still-birth and fatal sleeping accidents, and Sids for Kids hopes to change that ratio.
Business's in the city are selling Red Nose Day items such as pins, noses and novelties.
Local organiser Debbie Higgs said that she has handed out 60 boxes of goods across town since the start of this month.
Ms Higgs also said that locals had been very supportive of the cause over the 23 years she has run it.
"Last year we raised almost $10,000. I'd like to equal that," she said.
Ms Higgs said she got involved with Sids for Kids when her nephew died from the syndrome.
She and other Red Nose Day volunteers will be setting up a stall outside ANZ in Argent Street today to help raise money for the cause.
The stall will open at 9:30am.

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Film studio weeks from completion

Originally published: Friday, 25th June, 2010

What's been mooted as the world's first desert film studio is just weeks away from completion.

Another important milestone was reached on the $2 million project this week when City Council moved to accept an independent report agreeing that it would be good for the city.
Bankstown City Services measured the redevelopment of the old Central Power Station into the Broken Hill Film Studio against provisions under State Planning regulations including heritage development and the management of lead contamination.
The assessment found that the development of the Eyre Street complex was in the public interest and would be a good move for the city.
"Council granted approval for the change of use from the Central Power Station to the Film Studio," said City Council's general manager Mr Zaknich.
"It's one of the key milestone for the film studio development."
While Ccouncil could grant the re-use of the site for the multi-million dollar development to itself, it opted to have the independent body assess it to remain open and accountable.
"Council can grant it to itself but (to keep the process open and unbiased) it was done by the independent body," Mr Zaknich said.
The site had been proposed as a film studio due to the size of the buildings on it and their good condition.
Power to the Perilya mine which had been coming from the old CPS has since been relocated, and the Bankstown report noted that only minor work, like cleaning, painting and concreting, had to be done to get the place up to scratch.
The transfer of the site's ownership from Perilya to City Council, at the cost of $1, would happen within weeks, allowing for the remainder of the work to begin, Mr Zaknich said.
"The Perilya mine supply is now operating outside the building (and) we are finishing the rest of the cable relocation," he said.
"Once the sale contract is finalised we can concrete the floor and repair the roof."
Mr Zaknich said the project was on time to be ready for the filming of the new Mad Max movie, Fury Road, due to begin in August.
"August was always our target and it still is."
The film's producers have said the new studio will add another element to the city's desert location.
City Council will invest $1 million in the project while the NSW Government will contribute a further $1 million.

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Outback Car Trek success

Originally published: Friday, 25th June, 2010

Despite some bumps along the road the Royal Flying Doctor Service's 21st anniversary Outback Car Trek has ended successfully.

More than 330 people in pre-1971 cars took in some of the most remote parts of eastern Australia, travelling 3,741 kilometres in this year's event.
It began in Hay on June 6 and wound its way through outback South Australia and Queensland, before ending on June 12 on Hamilton Island, the destination of the first car trek.
Since it began back in 1990, the trek has raised more than $15 million for the RFDS.
While this year's tally has not yet been finalised, an RFDS spokesman said the goal of raising more than $1 million had been reached.
The final total will not be known for a couple of weeks because donations were still trickling in.
Trek organiser Bill Patrick said this year's event was "excellent".
"There was a large turnout and the country has never looked so good," Mr Patrick said.
He said despite the niggling mechanical breakdowns, the ingenuity of drivers was fantastic.
Travelling through Broken Hill was a highlight for Mr Patrick, even with the cold weather.
"A good time was had by all," he said.
Funds raised from previous car treks had helped the RFDS deliver emergency aeromedical and primary health care to communities in rural, regional and remote Australia.

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Keith Stanford a serious contendor

Originally published: Friday, 25th June, 2010

He may only compete for laughs but local motocross rider Keith Stanford has had a seriously good result in the recent Finke Desert Race.

 Competing in his fourth "Finke", the 22-year-old, riding a 2008 Honda CRF450R, finished an impressive 24th in his class and 40th overall - by far his best ever result.
 More than 500 riders and drivers took part in this year's race, described as the toughest in the Southern Hemisphere.
 Over two days and following the Old Ghan Railway track, competitors raced 230km from Alice Springs to the small town of Finke and back again.
 Its reputation as a tough event is justified, according to Stanford, who said several riders suffered broken arms and legs during the pre-race prologue stage.
 Stanford, who reached speeds of 170km/h during the race which was held over the June long weekend, completed the first day in just over 2hrs and 43min.
 His return trip was even faster, taking just over 2hrs 39min to return to Alice Springs, for a total time of 5hrs 23min, or 1hr 20min behind overall winner, Toby Price from Singleton.
 He put his good performance down to a "well-prepared" new bike.
 The result is even more impressive given his rather casual approach to the sport. The diesel mechanic's last competition race before entering the Finke was back in September last year at Mildura.
 But Stanford, who achieved his goal of finishing in the top 50, is serious about not taking racing "too seriously".
 Among other reasons, he says that it ensures he never gets too disappointed with his results.
 So he hasn't set the bar too high next year when he will compete in his fifth Finke with his father, Mark, who acted as crew chief and refueller for his son this year.
 "We'll see how we go. I'm not going to make any promises just yet," said Stanford, who had some help making it to the race.
 "I'd like to thank all the sponsors who helped out this year."
 Another local who competed in the event, Scott Dalby, said his team overcame an early setback to finish 14th in the pro-buggy class.
 Dalby and partner James Madden of Razorback Racing were last out of 94 competitors to begin the race, after their buggy broke a CV.
 The team still managed to finish 14th in their class and 27th overall, in a time of 4hrs 13min, just outside their target time of less than four hours.
 "A flat rear tyre added another 10 minutes onto the return time," said Dalby.


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Tributes flow in

Originally published: Thursday, 24th June, 2010

Tributes are flowing in for well-known local grazier Rob Seekamp after he was tragically killed in a plane crash.
Mr Seekamp has been remembered as a quiet but tireless worker, a voice for graziers in the western region and a loving father and husband of five children.
The close-knit Pastoralists Association of West Darling (PAWD), AgFair and the local member, John Williams, have all expressed sadness and shock at the death of Mr Seekamp, a third generation grazier.
The body of Mr Seekamp, 57, was found in a lake on his property, Woolcunda, by South Australia Police divers yesterday afternoon, along with the partially-submerged wreckage of his aircraft, a Cessna 172.
Mr Seekamp was last seen at around 9am on Monday when he took off in the plane from an airstrip on his property, about 120 kilometres south of Broken Hill. When he failed to return later that day an Australian Maritime Safety Authority air search and ground search was started.
The nation's air transport search team, 47 aircraft, including aircraft with night vision capability, scores of State Emergency Service workers, trained spotters, people on motorbikes, police from NSW, SA and VIC, ambulance personnel from SA, NSW and VIC and locals took part in the two-day search which covered more than 1,000 square kilometres centered on Woolcunda.
***
TIRELESS WORKER
Mr Seekamp was the immediate past president of the PAWD and the vice chairman of AgFair.
He was the immediate past president and life member of the Nanua Picnic Race Club and the chairman of the Wentworth Branch of the NSW Farmers Association.
He was an experienced pilot, flying for more than 40 years.
Current PAWD president Sue Andrews said Mr Seekamp was a tireless worker for the grazing community.
"He was very well respected in the district (and) I think he'll be very greatly missed," Mrs Andrews said.
"He was a hard worker for the Western Division and nothing was ever too much for him. He tried his hardest to do everything for everyone."
For three years Mr Seekamp held the PAWD reins, working on issues surrounding the Silverton Wind Farm, graziers rights in relation to mines and drought funding. He was also instrumental in affiliating the PAWD, a 100 year organisation, with Australia's peak national farming body.
"He achieved quite a lot," Mrs Andrews said.
"One of the biggest things he did I suppose was instigating the affiliation with
the National Farmers Federation.
"It's a big thing for the PAWD. It gives us top level support."
***
COMMITTED TO THE WEST
The Member for Murray-Darling, John Williams, said Mr Seekamp was a committed parent and husband and his death was a tragedy and a great loss.
"The death of Rob Seekamp will leave a huge hole in the grazing community in Western NSW," Mr Williams said.
"Rob had been an active supporter for graziers in remote areas and spent a lot of time with the ICPA.
"He has been a voice for graziers in Western NSW.
"He's been a committed parent and committed to the education of his children.
"My sympathy goes out to his wife, Vicky, and his children who I know will be missing him greatly."
Mr Williams said Mr Seekamp was a wonderful person.
"He was a quiet achiever he was a great guy," Mr Williams said.
"He just took everything in is stride and never missed a beat.
"It's a massive loss - a man of his calibre and his nature  - the loss is even greater."
***
QUIET ACHIEVER
The chairman of AgFair, Kevin Taylor, said Mr Seekamp had been on the committee for two decades and was a great supporter of AgFair.
"Rob will be sorely missed. He was a tireless worker. Rob was a guy that nothing was too much trouble for him," Mr Taylor said.
"He attended all the (AgFair) meetings and it was a fair way for him to come but he always made a point of it.
"It is an absolutely tragedy and it's pretty hard to come to terms with at the moment."
Mr Taylor said he was a quiet but great achiever.
"He didn't say very much but you could rely on him. He was very much a quiet achiever," he said.
"He was a guy that used to nothing was too much trouble. He always made sure he was right in there giving a hand.
"We just wish his family all the best and it's pretty obvious what they would be going through. Whatever we can do we will and we wish them all the very best."
***
CHILDREN'S EDUCATION ADVOCATE
Ross Andrews, a fellow grazier and long time friend of Mr Seekamp, was invovled in the search since Monday and said it had been emotionally tough.
"I felt it was heartfelt duty to spend the time looking for Rob," Mr Andrews said.
"It was very tough. I had to step aside today as I was emotionally taxed."
Mr Andrews said Mr Seekamp had children's education at heart.
He was the co-ordinator of the Volunteers for Isolated Children's Education (VICE), past president of the Broken Hill branch of the Isolated Children's Parents' Association (ICPA), past president of the NSW State Council ICPA, life member of the NSW branch of the ICPA and past council member of the Federal Council of the ICPA.
Mr Andrews said Mr Seekamp was also the chairman of the Allison House management committee and the Allison House Association and was a progressive grazier.
"He worked tirelessly for Allison House, the bush children's hostel, being its current chairman at the time of his passing," Mr Andrews said.
"It was a passion for him to assist in educating the children of the Western Division that never had daily access to school.
"He was a wonderful man who had the Western Division at heart and worked tirelessly for all that lived in it.
"He wasn't afraid to tackle new ventures with his grazing enterprise. He saw merit in moving into dorper sheep production and was very successful. He also appreciated the value of harvesting the local goats.
"Fellow graziers have been telephoning me for updates on the search and rescue.
"They had been hoping for good news and staying positive and we were eventually devastated at the loss."
NSW Police divers are expected to arrive at the scene today to assist in the salvage and recovery operation, police said.
Four investigators from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau will also arrive at the scene to try to determine to cause of the crash, police said.

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Training to combat airport terrorism

Originally published: Thursday, 24th June, 2010

The Police Counter Terrorism and Special Tactics Command were
in the city yesterday to conduct training exercises for local airport
security.
Twenty-four country airports will be tested in the 2009-10 Regional
Airport Training and Exercise (RATE) program, police said.
The NSW Police Force Counter Terriorism and Special Tactics Command co-ordinated the training which involves a specialist team visiting each of the airports to undertake a range of activities.
The training team comprises officers from the Counter Terrorism and
Special Tactics Command
Co-ordinated Response
Group which includes Fire
Brigade and Ambulance
Service officers and representatives
of the Office of
Transport Security,
Department of
Infrastructure, Transport,
Regional Development
and Local Government.
The Counter Terrorism
and Special Tactics
Command Terrorism
Intelligence Unit, and
Australian Federal Police
Aviation Intelligence
teams also attended.
Sergeant Peter Ray,
from the Counter
Terrorism and Special
Tactics Co-ordinated
Response Group, said that
despite the extremely low
threat an upgrade in awarness
was needed.
“Enhancing security is
constantly looked at,” said
Sergeant Ray.
He said the program
also addressed normal
domestic airport problems.

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St John's church parade

Originally published: Thursday, 24th June, 2010

The St John’s Ambulance team held their annual church parade on Sunday.
The parade is always held on the closest Sunday to the 24th of June, which is St John the Baptist Day.
“It is for all St John
members and goes right
through from cadets to first
aid services and the training
branch,” said secretary and
training member Merrilyn
Pedergnana.
Each year they choose a
church and are included in
the church’s service. This
year they picked St James’
Church on Wilson Street.
“The reason we chose
that church was because
one of our cadets Jusara
Capel was the Cadet of the
Year, and it is her church.”
Jusara also did a reading
at the service, along with
chairman Jim Daly who
gave a short talk on the
history of St John’s which
goes right back to the
Crusade.
Anyone wishing to
volunteer or undergo
one of St John’s first aid
courses may contact Ms
Pedergnana on 0435 104
575.

+ Read article

Karl showing his support

Originally published: Thursday, 24th June, 2010

South resident Karl “Otto” Hahn, a selfconfessed sports fanatic,
was desperately hoping yesterday for the Socceroos to win.
The 67-year-old, who has lived in Broken Hill since 2008, decorated the front of his house for the game that was to be played against Serbia this morning.
“I thought I’d do something
for South Broken
Hill,” said Mr Hahn.
“How good is it that?
I’m 67 and I can still do
this. You have to have fire
in your belly.”
Mr Hahn, originally
from Austria, said he
thought that with the city
being such an Aussie
Rules town he could bring
some soccer excitement
into other people’s lives.

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Locals on show

Originally published: Wednesday, 23rd June, 2010

Selected local artists
will have their
works exhibited at the
Broken Hill Regional
Art Gallery next year in
a move to develop the
local art scene.
The gallery has put aside
six exhibition periods next
year to help encourage artists.
Regional Art Gallery
manager Bruce Tindale
said the measure, in its
second year, would have
many benefits for the artists,
including having their
work hung and viewed in
the gallery and through the
application process.
“It’s quite a valuable
thing,” Mr Tindale said.
“We get roughly 2000
people through every exhibition
period. We also take
out ads in the media, getting
their name out there.
“We have a lot of visitors
from away so they’re
not just exposed to the
local market.
“It can help assist with
their economic position -
if the works are for sale
it’s a chance to retail their
works.
“There are excellent
benefits for the artist.”
To apply, artists must
submit a proposal to the
gallery which includes
copies of their works and
a background of their proposed
exhibition.
Mr Tindale said the
process would be similar
to that of larger galleries
in other centres.
“This process has been
developed to ensure equity
in encouraging regional
artists to experience the
professional environment
of a regional gallery,” he
said.
“The application process
is similar to some
commercial galleries and
will provide the applicants
with useful professional
experience in developing
an exhibition proposal.”
Mr Tindale said both
individuals and groups
would be considered in the
selection process. A panel,
including members of City
Council’s Art Advisory
Committee, would decide
on the winners.
The six artists, or
groups of artists, will have
their work hung for about
six weeks and would be
shown with two other exhibitions,
possibly including
high quality art on touring
exhibitions.
Proposals must be
received no later than
Friday, September 3, and
artists will be advised of
the outcome by September
30.
Contact the Broken Hill
Regional Art Gallery on
08 8080 3440 or artgallery@
brokenhill.nsw.gov.
au for a copy of the guidelines
or to discuss your
proposal.

+ Read article

The dangers of drink

Originally published: Wednesday, 23rd June, 2010

Year 10 and 11 students
have been shown the effects
of excessive drinking
during a two-day forum
held as part of National
Drug Action Week.
Local students as
well as students from
Wilcannia, Menindee
and Ivanhoe attended the
forum conducted by the
Community Drug Action
Team (CDAT) on Monday
and yesterday.
One activity involved
students wearing “beer
goggles,” and trying to
manoevure around cones
while holding a tray of
drinks.
The beer goggles show
the students what drinking
does to their motor skills
and balance.
“It simulates the
intoxication level in six
different levels,” said
the secretary of CDAT,
Geraldine Kaczmarek.
Guest speaker Chris
Raine is the creator of a
blog titled “Hello Sunday
Morning”.
The blog detailed how
Mr Raine stopped drinking
for 12 months and the good
things he got out of it.
“The forum is aimed at
educating and increasing
awareness of the dangers
of excessive drug and
alcohol use and harm
minimisation,” said
CDAT chairman Scott
Hammond.
“This year we will pay
particular attention to
encouraging young people
to look at the alternatives
in lifestyle.
“This will complement
Chris Raine’s Hello
Sunday Morning project,
what could we be doing
on our Sunday mornings
instead of lying in bed
or lounging around with
a hangover, what are the
alternatives on a Saturday
night and what role can
the community play in all
this.
“These are just some of
the challenging questions
that will be put to our
young participants.”
Close to 400 students
attended the forum.

+ Read article

After-hours replacement

Originally published: Wednesday, 23rd June, 2010

The Outback Family Practice will run an after-hours GP clinic in Broken Hill after receiving $100,000 in funding from the Federal Government. The clinic will begin operating on Monday and will help ease the workload from the impending closure of the after-hours clinic operating at the hospital. “The contract we signed with the Department of Health and Ageing is for $100,000 over two years to run an after-hours clinic for our practice,” said the co-owner and director of the practice, Dr Ros Menzies. “The money is to go towards the receptionist wages and ... toward the doctors’ salaries as an incentive,” Dr Menzies said yesterday. The funding allocation comes just one week before the hospital’s after-hours clinic is due to close. That clinic, which has run on the weekends for the past two years, will close next Wednesday due to a shortage of staff. The Riverina Division of General Practice’s chief executive officer, Nancy Piercy, said last month that local GPs had not been willing to staff the clinic. But Dr Menzies said her co-owner and director Dr Funmi Komolafe and the four other general practitioners at the Outback Family Practice would be more motivated to work the extra hours given it was for their own practice. “We’ve all been really, really working hard anyway and it was really difficult to contemplate (working at the afterhours clinic),” she said. “(But) we’ve made the commitment, it’s our own practice, we are used to the systems, we’ll have a nurse most of the time - it’s more functional. “You’re not picking yourself up and going into a new environment.” Dr Menzies said the work burden would be eased for doctors working late because they would begin their shifts in the afternoon. She said GPs from other practices in town would be welcome to work on the roster. The after-hours clinic will operate from Monday to Friday from 6pm to 9pm and will be for emergency GP-type complaints like children with sore throats or other non-life threatening emergencies. Duty Senator for Farrer, Mark Arbib, yesterday welcomed the funding by the Minister for Health Nicola Roxon. “The Government’s investment will make it easier for the community to find a doctor after hours,” Senator Arbib said. “Good primary care in local communities means people stay healthier, manage chronic disease and illness more effectively, and stay out of hospital. “The Government’s General Practice After Hours Program is helping to build and strengthen after-hours care by general practitioners across Australia.” Appointments can be made by calling the clinic on 80887044.

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Draw for Barrier at State carnival

Originally published: Wednesday, 23rd June, 2010

The Barrier Boys Football side headed across to Nowra on the NSW south coast from the 8th to the 10th of June to play in the PSSA Football State carnival.

+ Read article

Couple following the sun

Originally published: Tuesday, 22nd June, 2010

A Brisbane couple who won an all-expenses paid road trip around Australia arrived in Broken Hill at the weekend.

Tony Johnson and Sue Hammond entered a competition called "Follow the Sun", in which three couples each win $35,000 in prizes.
The prize includes a 13-week all expenses paid road trip around Australia, as well as a complete make-over for the winners' caravan.
Each winner takes one of three routes, and Tony and Sue are the only ones to travel through Broken Hill.
The Winnebago that the couple have had for more than two years had a new fridge and inside shower installed as part of their prize.
"We use to have an outdoor shower, which from a design point of view is a stupid idea," Mr Johnson said.
The couple have been on the road for just under a week, stopping at Gundagai, Narrabri, and Dubbo along the way.
"We left on the 16th of this month, and we travel through to the 15th of September," Mr Johnson said.
The couple have been "motor-homing" for 32 years, and this is their first visit to town.
Every caravan park they visit, the couple hold a "Happy Hour" where people staying at the park can meet them and share a drink.
Mr Johnson said it was good because it meant they had some other people to talk to about motor homing and travelling.
During their stay, the couple visited the Flying Doctor's and the School of the Air, and managed to fit in time to look at Peter Anderson and Pro Hart's Art Galleries.
"We could easily spend a weekend here," Ms Hammond said.
Mr Johnson said that the town had a lot of surprises in it.
"I think it's a surprising town, we didn't expect it to look like this.
"The heritage is just superb."
The couple will leave town today and stop over in Adelaide before heading on through Victoria.

+ Read article

Jason goes to the printer

Originally published: Tuesday, 22nd June, 2010

Jason McCarthur has realised his life-long dream of writing a children's picture book.

He has put pen to paper and finally published a story about his best mate.
After moving to Broken Hill eight years ago, Jason came up with an idea for a story after he saved his greyhound Kane, from drowning.
Jason and Kane were on the River Murray and Kane ran into the water, but he didn't know how to swim.
the incident inspired Jason to put pen to paper and he came up with the story "Kane goes to the beach". The book follows Kane as he has an enjoyable day at the beach.
He held on to the story for five years until his mother found it and encouraged him to get it published.
Jason asked Robert Groves to illustrate the book. When Robert coined the first pictures of Kane the greyhound, Jason knew he had chosen the "right person for the job".
"Kane was a fun-loving greyhound and Bob brought that out in the book," said Jason.
After about 15 months of work on the illustration then another two years to raise enough money to self-publish the book, "Kane goes to the beach" is now finally hitting the shelves.
"Everyone who has seen it is happy with it," said Jason.
This book has also helped others, with Jason providing the book to charities such as Lifeline and the Liberty Church and using it to raise awareness about the Greyhound Adoption Program.
Jason said he didn't write the book to make money and he was happy to be giving back.
The book can be found at Browsers Bookstore and South Newsagency.
Unfortunately Kane passed away three months ago and never got to see the final copy.

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Sunny Boy Love upto the challenge

Originally published: Tuesday, 22nd June, 2010

Short-priced favourite Sunny Boy Love took out Saturday's GRNSW Country Challenge at the Newmarket Raceway with a devastating burst of speed from the boxes.

The Kenneth Gill-trained and Scott Slater owned dog was a couple of lengths in front by the time they reached the first line the first time, and was never headed.
Mildura Hoon chased him hard and got to within about a length coming off the back but the favourite clicked up another gear and burst away to record a five-and-a-half length win from kennelmate Uno Blackjack, who made good ground over the concluding stages. Mildura Hoon finished third two-and-a-quarter lengths away.
The time was quite quick - 30.44 - after running a blistering 30.30 in the heat last week.
The other feature event of the day was the Sturt Club Maiden which went to the Fred Sweet-trained Fifth Gear who began a little slowly but railed up brilliantly in the straight to score by two-and-a-half lengths from Brett's Boy with Lego Man third. Full results on page 14.

+ Read article

Students take to the stage

Originally published: Monday, 21st June, 2010

The annual Willyama High School concert is being held at the Entertainment Centre on June 29 and everyone is invited to attend.

The concert, which is one of four performed by the school each year, will see students from year seven through to 12 take to the stage.
It will feature a range of solo, group, instrumental and vocal performances.
Tickets cost $7.70 and are available from the school office.
All locals are encouraged to come and watch the students perform at their very best, according to music teacher Velko Gavranich.
Mr Gavranich hopes to see as many people attend as possible and hopefully Willyama can match last year's numbers, which saw about 700 people attending.



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Fundraiser far from trivial

Originally published: Monday, 21st June, 2010

A trivia night aimed at raising money for two Willyama High School students to attend a leaders conference in the US was a surprising success on Friday night.

Year 10 students Hayden Zammit and Cassie McEvoy and English teacher Jo Hirst organised the fundraiser aimed at raising money for the two to attend the Global Youth Leaders Conference in Washington DC and New York City next month.
The event was held in the Musicians Club hall which was provided free of charge for the night by the club.
Organisers said over 150 participants attended the night that proved to be very successful.
19 teams of five or more worked through ten rounds of questions based on geography, entertainment, and sport; which were read by local radio announcer Andrew Schmidt.
Teacher Joanne Hirst was overwhelmed with the support from the community.
“We’re absolutely delighted because so many people have given things and provided donations,” Ms Hirst said.
Hayden Zammit was also surprised at the turn out and thanked the community.
“We’ve had great support from all people who have come to the Trivia Night tonight, especially with our auction that we’ve held,” Hayden said.
Art works from various Broken Hill artists were auctioned off by Nic McNamara at the half way point of the night, and caused some competition between the crowd.
John Dynon, Wendy Martin, Ian Lewis and Howard Steer prints earned over $700 collectively.
Julie Hart, who donated a framed print from her art gallery was bought for $230, and a Pro Hart original etching donated by his wife Raylee was bought for $500.
“We’ve estimated to have raised well over $1000 which is definelty a fantastic effort and a great contribution to our trip,” Hayden said.
A “Heads or Tails” competition was held along with bonus games which had players naming certain famous faces and flags from around the world.
MC Andrew Schmidt said it’s one of the biggest turn outs he’s seen for a trivia night.
“I’ve been involved with probably 100 quiz nights and trivia nights over the years and in terms of response this is the biggest one I’ve ever seen.”
“It was a great cause, raised quite a bit of money but at the end of the day the main thing is they’ve all had a little bit of fun.”
Hayden said currently, he does not know how much money was collectively raised.

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Range of pets for sale at Vet Clinic

Originally published: Monday, 21st June, 2010

The Broken Hill Veterinary Clinic is urging people to think about adopting an animal.

The clinic has 14 animals available including kittens, pups, cats and dogs.
Karen Savage, a veterinary nurse assistant, said a lot of people might not know that the BH Vet Clinic has pets for sale.
The six to eight-week-old pups include a Staffordshire bull terrier-cross, a labrador-cross, a chihuahua-cross and a border collie-cross.
The male short-haired kittens are about the same age as the pups.
The pets at the BH Vet Clinic cost $60 which includes micro-chipping.
Ms Savage said they also get a lot of strays and if anyone was looking for a lost pet they should visit the clinic in Rakow Street.

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Truckie's miraculous escape

Originally published: Friday, 18th June, 2010

Police are investigating whether a suspension malfunction caused a semi-trailer loaded with potatoes to overturn in the early hours of yesterday morning.

The 33-year-old driver suffered only minor injuries when his single trailer truck rolled onto the passenger's side and skidded along the side of the Barrier Highway before slamming into a creek.
Police said the truck driver, from Berri in South Australia, suspected some part of the suspension on his Kenworth truck failed as he negotiated a left hand band about 30 kilometres from Broken Hill.
They said passing motorists contacted police and that emergency services also attended the scene.
The driver, who did not need medical attention after the accident, did not appear to be at fault, said police.

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Airways pilot on a sentimental journey

Originally published: Friday, 18th June, 2010

The co-pilot of the first Silver City Airways Lancastrian that arrived in Broken Hill in 1946 has returned to the city.

Roy Day, a former Royal Air Force pilot during World War II, turned 23 when he first arrived in Australia from England.
He is now 86 years old and has come back to reminisce.
"Just after the war I decided there was nothing for me in aviation so I decided to fall on my father's profession of a dentist. But when I found myself sitting amongst school kids who hadn't had a four-year break in their education, it was all a bit over my head," Mr Day said.
He said that he could see from the aviation magazines in England that they were "crying out for pilots," so he got his pilot's licence.
In the first week he was offered three different jobs, one of which was with Silver City Airlines.
"I went up for the interview on the Monday and they said 'can you fly on Friday?," Mr Day said.
He remembers that they drove him out to Heathrow Airport the day before when the airport "was a marquee and there was so much mud about."
The plane he was flying was a converted Lancaster Bomber that seated 13 people, and Mr Day said that they had removed the turrets and put metal in its place.
They left London and stopped over in Malta, Cairo and Khartoum.
The crew spent several weeks in Johannesburg and then flew out to pick up a team of six geologists enroute to Broken Hill.
Mr Day said he arrived here on November 30, 1946 and enjoyed a lavish dinner at a local hotel.
"We had dinner at the Royal Exchange, and all the top brass from the mine were there, and it was quite a formal occasion."
Mr Day said that the crew was taken on a tour of a mine and later flew back to Sydney.
He said this week that coming back to town gave him a "nostalgia kick," although he didn't remember a great deal from his first visit.
Roy Day is a resident of Cornwall in the UK and has three children and eight grandchildren.
He was looking forward to riding the Indian Pacific train when he leaves for Sydney today.

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Council seeks to renew ties with Chinese city

Originally published: Friday, 18th June, 2010

City Council representatives met with a delegation from Taixing City, China, this week in a bid to revitalise the Sister City relationship between the two.

Councillors met with the Taixing delegation, now visiting Australia and New Zealand, on Wednesday in Sydney.
The delegation included Mayor Gao Yazi and Vice Mayor Huang Hongqi of Taixing Municipal People's Government and representatives of the Taixing Municipal Government Administration and Jiangsu Taixing Economic Development Zone.
The Sister City relationship between Broken Hill and Taixing was formed in 1998.
It aimed to freely exchange people, ideas and cultures to enhance the friendship and mutual understanding and goodwill of the residents of the two cities.
Councillor Bob Algate said the lunch meeting had gone well.
"During the meeting the City of Broken Hill progressed its earlier invitation to the City of Taixing for consideration of revitalising all aspects of this friendly relationship and that all avenues of economic development, trade opportunities, friendship and cultural exchange be explored to the mutual advantage of both communities" said Clr Bob Algate.
"Council has taken the first important steps to do so."

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Slater's Boy one to beat

Originally published: Friday, 18th June, 2010

Coulta Colleen's 525m track record has stood the test of time - nine years to be exact - but will come under fire when a locally-owned pup headlines the local Greyhound Racing NSW Country Challenge final tomorrow.

The Scott Slater-owned Sunny Boy Love appears to have a mortgage on the $3,000 winner's purse after coming within just 0.02s of breaking Coulta Colleen's long-standing mark of 30.33s in his heat run last week.
Sunny Boy Love, drawn a little awkwardly in box five for the final, has already amassed more than $40,000 in prizemoney, having predominantly raced at Adelaide's Angle Park.
But he faces a situation similar to 2009 when he was a raging hot favourite for the Broken Hill final, but bungled the start.
One who will be keen to take advantage of any chink in Sunny Boy Love's armour will be hometown hero Sheza Glamour, prepared by the husband and wife training team of Donna and Terry Gaiter.
The local Country Challenge final is one of the few feature events in town to elude the successful duo, and Terry Gaiter is hoping that can be rectified.
"It'd be good to win," he said.
"My wife has won the trainer's premiership out here recently and we've won just about every feature race here apart from this one and the McLeods Traditional, which is a big race held here on Melbourne Cup day.
"She's (Sheza Glamour) pretty well bred and it's a great achievement to be the only Broken Hill dog in the final."
One thing working in Sheza Glamour's favour is the coveted box one. The Where's Pedro bitch, boasting an edge in track experience on her rivals having had all but one of her 17 starts here, has never been beaten in four attempts with the red rug, a record sure to come under scrutiny in the final.
"I don't think she can beat Sunny Boy Love, but she's had four starts off the red for four wins," Terry said.
"You take Sunny Boy Love out of the final and she's right in it and off the red she's got to be a chance.
"She's an inside dog and she drew on the wrong side of the track (in the heats). We paid $500 for a half share in her and got her up from Melbourne and she has already won two feature races here at Broken Hill."
Such is the diverse nature of the field for the final that greyhounds based in NSW, Victoria and South Australia make up the top eight slated for the final on Broken Hill's biggest day of greyhound racing.
The Country Challenge final will start at 2.35pm.

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Footy fans line up to meet local hero

Originally published: Thursday, 17th June, 2010

Adelaide Crows’ forward Taylor Walker was in the town square yesterday to meet fans and sign autographs.
Taylor is home to catch up with family and friends and support a few local businesses.
This week of football is a split round and Adelaide will be up against Melbourne on Sunday.
Taylor will also be catching up with his old football team North.
So is there any chance of him lining up with the Bulldogs on Saturday?
“No, I fly out on Friday, but I will get out to see them train,” he said.
Taylor acknowledged that while this season hasn’t been one of the Crows’ best, he hoped that they might turn it around soon.
“This hasn’t been the best season. Hopefully we can get a few more wins.”
Local businesses are also getting behind the AFL rising star.
“He’s giving something back to the local kids,” said local shop owner Lyn Carthew.
Taylor will be at the Toyota dealership today from 3pm to 5pm to meet fans and have a chat.

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Bid to lengthen mine’s life

Originally published: Thursday, 17th June, 2010

Drilling has begun at a known deposit near the White Dam gold mine in an attempt to extend its mine life.

Just days after the official opening of the gold mine, 80 kilometres west of Broken Hill, drill rigs moved in to test other deposits.
Polymetals' chief operating officer Tim Dobson said now the mine was making money it was time to look to the future.
"Now that we have cash flow we are able to aggressively test the near-mine other deposits that we're aware of," Mr Dobson said.
"(Last) week we start(ed) our first sampling campaign so we're going to do some ... trenching. Our drill rigs are coming from the White Dam pit and they'll move directly onto the exploration drilling at the end of that."
The five-week drilling program will target Vertigo, which Mr Dobson said was the deposit they knew most about.
"It's the most well defined of our near-mine targets so we're going for that first."
This would be followed by other deposits located within five kilometres of the White Dam pit, including White Dam North and Ambush.
Mr Dobson said while White Dam's mine life was two years, a 1.5 year mine life extension had already been flagged.
"Potentially (there is) a one-and-a-half-year extension and we have to prove that with drilling and that's what we're going to start to do right now."
Mr Dobson said he hoped that a good drilling result could mean no gap between the end of mining on the current pit and the beginning of mining on the new targets.
"That will allow us to turn them into the next deposit with the ambition of not having a gap in production so that our earth movers can go straight from one pit to the next pit," he said.
"That's no mean feat. We have approvals to get through with government and we also have to do the technical engineering around bringing those other pits into production.
"That will take a little bit of time to figure out and come up with what is a resource statement for that deposit, turn that into a pit design, a haul road, go to the government and get permission to mine it and make sure we can fit it into our processing facility at White Dam."
The Polymetals Group and Exco Resources are in a joint venture to mine White Dam, which is expected to produce around 50,000 ounce of gold annually.

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Trevor finds everything works out in the long run

Originally published: Thursday, 17th June, 2010

Good things come in threes, but local railwayman Trevor Rudd will have to settle for two for the moment.

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Sam ready for next test

Originally published: Thursday, 17th June, 2010

Talented local cricketer Samantha Betts is among 29 girls chosen for the South Australian under 18s cricket squad.

The 14-year-old, who plays cricket locally for West and for Adelaide's Tea Tree Gully in the SA A-grade competition, learned she was picked in the youth squad late last month.
Sam, the youngest girl in the squad, said she was probably chosen for her bowling skills.
"I got marked on my A-grade season and I was mainly a bowler there," she said yesterday.
"I feel pretty confident because I've looked at all the figures of all the other girls in the squad and I'm up with them."
The all-rounder, who regularly bowls at 96 kilometres per hour, had a good season in the SA competition, despite her team losing the semi-finals to Sturt District.
In that game Sam claimed the scalp of one of her cricketing heroes, Australian women's team member and all rounder Shelley Nitschke, who this year won her second Women's International Cricketer of the Year award in a row.
Sam said it was the highlight of her career so far.
"I did an outswinger ball and it came into her because she's a left hander. Bowled her - yes, middle stump," she said.
"I jumped up in the air and ran over to my team mates.
"She's a great batsman and she's been voted the best all-rounder and that just puts my confidence up being able to get a great batter like that out."
Sam said after the game Shelley congratulated her.
"She shook my hand and told me that I bowled well."
Sam will soon begin training and has a long wait until November to see if she will make the final team.
She has also been selected in the SA under 15 youth squad.

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Iron ore mine the target

Originally published: Wednesday, 16th June, 2010

It is no surprise that Perilya has decided to shelve the reopening of its Potosi mine, according to a resource analyst.

James Wilson from DJ Carmichael said with zinc prices at five-year lows, zinc stockpiles at five-year highs and the world economy looking shaky, mining companies were considering their positions.
"Looking at the five-year trend for zinc we are at record lows - around $1100/tonne. Don't forget the price has been as high as $4600, so it's not surprising that they've gone and hedged their bets," Mr Wilson said.
The majority-owned Chinese mining company, Perilya, flagged the shelving of Potosi early this month in a presentation to the UBS Australian Resources Conference.
At that conference Perilya said there were three drivers to the mine going ahead: metal prices, approvals and the resources super profits tax.
It told the conference that the "project does not generate adequate returns at current metal prices".
But Perilya's Broken Hill mine manager Andrew Lord said he could not say at what price zinc would need to be to bring Potosi off the shelf.
"There isn't an easy answer to that - it depends on the exchange rates and the price," he said.
The zinc price has plunged by around 40 per cent this year, placing in doubt emerging zinc prospects, not just in Australia but globally, including the world's largest zinc mine in Alaska.
The price of zinc, which is used for galvanising steel, reached a high this year back in early January when it reached around US$1.20 per pound. It had slumped to about US$0.73 in early June.
Mr Wilson said commodity prices, including zinc prices, were affected by the EU debt crisis, growth in China and slower demand for metals in the United States.
"It's not surprising that zinc prices have come off," he said.
Mr Wilson said an oversupply of zinc was also having a bearing on price.
"We have quite high stockpiles of zinc - it's at five year high," he said.
"There's 617,350 tonnes of ore (currently stockpiled and), yes it's having an effect, oversupply.
"We need to whittle that down before we see better prices."
Meanwhile Mr Lord said two things were saving the local mine in the current climate; silver prices and their human resources.
"Our employees have worked pretty hard and very safely," Mr Lord said.
"Our Chinese majority shareholder has been a great partner and some time ago they were able to help us by providing a loan."
That loan enabled them to buy their way out of a silver contract meaning Perilya could sell their silver on the market.
"We now have full exposure today," Mr Lord said.
He said before the deal Perilya was getting around US$2.40 per ounce of silver whereas now the price was US$18.41 per ounce.
"We don't get all of that .... but we're still along way ahead than before."
Mr Lord said at this stage there will be no changes to Perilya's Broken Hill mining operations.
"At this stage we have no plans to cut back at our operation at Broken Hill," he said.
"But we're not looking at expanding our operations either."
Perilya also said approvals needed to be gained in particular with "respect to ore haulage routes" before Potosi could get off the ground.
The development application associated with that is before City Council and has received around 80 submission, mostly related to the trucking route.
"I'm neither confident nor pessimistic about the approval," Mr Lord said.
"If we don't get the DA approved we cannot go ahead."
The company also said the uncertainty surrounding the resources super profits tax "makes investment decisions difficult".
Mr Lord said he did not know if their Chinese partner, Shenzhen Zhongjin Lingnan Nonfemet, had any concerns over the RSPT but that projects would be put on hold until the outcome of that was certain.
"One only enters into any business for making money for their shareholders," Mr Lord said.
"While that uncertainty is around we and other mining companies are putting projects on hold."

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MP lends his support to weir pool petition

Originally published: Wednesday, 16th June, 2010

A 500-signature petition calling for the relocation of the Wilcannia weir will be tabled in NSW Parliament next week.

The Darling River Action Group handed the petition to the Member for Murray-Darling, John Williams, yesterday in the hope that he could expedite the process of moving the weir from its current location upstream near the hospital to downstream below the bridge.
DRAG's chairman Mark Hutton said the measure would create jobs, tourism opportunities and bring back morale.
"It would be a boon for Wilcannia," Mr Hutton said.
"Hopefully, John can push this through to the relevant authorities as an urgent matter."
Mr Hutton said the petition was organised after he was approached by a cross-section of the Wilcannia community, including Aboriginal elders, who could see that having permanent water would help their community.
"This weir pool would be a tremendous asset to the township and would not only be a reliable source of town water ... it would also be a major draw card for the thousands of tourists that currently pass through Wilcannia without stopping," he said.
"The environmental benefits would include permanent deep water pools for native fish and wildlife. These pools would preserve breeding stock during drought and increasingly long periods between flows that we now experience.
"Native trees and shrubs along the river would also benefit from the permanent water supply."
Mr Hutton said a permanent weir pool would also create employment.
"With permanent water the opportunity for industries such as a paddle steamer  for cruises on the Darling, walking trails along the river, camp and picnic areas, an indigenous cultural centre, paddle steamer museum (would flourish)," he said.
Mr Williams said he supported the petition and would speak on the petition in Parliament next week.
He said he believed it would have a positive impact on the community.
"It would retain a weir pool for the community of Wilcannia (and) no doubt having a full river ... would lift the spirits and the community would be pleased to see that it had some water under the bridge," Mr Williams said.
"It would be good for community moral, for recreational activities which Wilcannia desperately needs to develop."
Mr Hutton said they were not looking at increasing the amount of water the weir held, just relocating it.


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Lend a hand for an arm and a leg

Originally published: Wednesday, 16th June, 2010

The hunt is on for hundreds of pairs of unused borrowed crutches from the hospital's Emergency Department.

In light of the increasing problem of missing crutches, the Broken Hill Health Service is urging people to return them.
"The non-return of loaned crutches means the Health Service is continually purchasing new stock which is an unnecessary cost to the system and unfair to those people who have a genuine need for them," said Briana Bartley, Nurse Unit Manager at the Emergency Department.
"There are potentially hundreds of pairs of crutches scattered across the community, forgotten and unused," Ms Bartley said.
"The hospital distributes more than 20 to 25 sets of crutches in any week and only a miniscule number of them are ever returned.
"So, if you no longer require your crutches, please return them so they can be used by people who genuinely need them."
People may return the crutches to the Emergency Department at any time.

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Jake right up to the mark

Originally published: Wednesday, 16th June, 2010

Junior shooter Jake Lloyd did spectacularly well at a competition in Mildura over the long weekend.

Fifteen-year-old Jake came home with the gold medal in the junior section and finished second overall in the annual North West Victorian Championships against 50 competitors.
The Mildura Smallbore Rifle Club conducted the competition in which Jake, in Benchrest Class Three, came second after winning the 50 metre, 20 metre and overall sub junior comp.
Jake said he was pretty surprised to finish so high up among the older marksmen.
"I am happy with how I did," he said.
Jake's love of shooting was nurtured by his grandfather who has given him plenty of encouragement.
"It's just something I like doing.
"I would like to go to the Olympics or compete overseas."
Jake started shooting at the age of 12 and showed promise from the first day when he entered Benchrest at the Silver City Smallbore Rifle Club.
Over the past 12 months, he has travelled to South Australia and Victoria to take part in Nationals and Open Prize shoots.

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Sheila has a Lion's heart

Originally published: Tuesday, 15th June, 2010

Western Australian Sheila Howard has decided that planes, trains and automobiles are way too relaxing to travel from one side of Australia to another, so she's opted to ride her bicycle instead.

Mrs Howard, decided to undertake the 36-day ride when she was invited to the Lions Club Convention in Sydney.
The 69-year-old grandmother, who is riding from Bunbury WA to Sydney with her husband, stopped off in Broken Hill on Sunday for a much needed rest.
It's the second visit the couple have made to the city and they both loved it.
"It's beautiful, very lush and green," Mrs Howard said.
Mr and Mrs Howard enjoyed lunch at Club Legion with local Lions members and were taken around town to local points of interest by Lions member Trevor Odgers and his wife Pam.
Mrs Howard has ridden her bicycle from Darwin to Adelaide, Rockhampton to Darwin, and even from France to Belgium and on to Holland.
She was also one of the torchbearers during the 2000 Sydney Olympics.
"The mental part of it is the hardest. When you get head winds and you're going 14kph its hard to keep going, but I do," Mrs Howard said.
She has faced extreme weather over the years, such as severe hail storms and extreme heat.
"There's no point looking at the weather, because you know you just have to do it no matter what."
Mrs Howard aims to ride close to 190 kilometres a day, which means waking up at 5.30am each morning.
Husband Norm drives along with her, towing their caravan.
"Norm heads off later after he has packed the van, and I've usually done about 40km's by then, then he catches up to me.
"You may as well do it now while you can, because you're a long time dead," he said.
The Lions Cancer Institute that the couple are raising money for, has been performing free skin cancer screenings for WA residents for the past 20 years.
Shortly after arriving in Sydney, Mrs Howard will reach another milestone, turning 70.

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Pro's work for art auction

Originally published: Tuesday, 15th June, 2010

Pro Hart's widow Raylee Hart has made a generous donation to a "once in a lifetime" trip for two local students.

Willyama High School students Cassie McEvoy and Hayden Zammit have had a Pro Hart original, a Julie Hart print, and four Howard Steer paintings donated to the auction which will be held on Friday.
"Some of the various artists in Broken Hill donated such great artworks towards the trivia night, Raylee Hart and the Pro Hart Art Gallery for example, such world known artists making such a huge contribution to the youth of Broken Hill," Hayden said.
Mrs Hart said she was happy to help.
"I'd just like to be able to help. I mean it's good to be able to help your fellow man and your community," Mrs Hart said.
The art works will be auctioned off, along with other items at the trivia night.
"We'll be having an auction at interval on the night which will be at 8:30, for those people not coming to the trivia night but still interested in the auction," Hayden said.
He and Cassie have also received donations such as men's gift packs to be used as small prizes on the night, as well as a yet unknown donation from Retravision.
Hayden also said that Willyama P and C had given them a donation.

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Winter warmers in demand

Originally published: Tuesday, 15th June, 2010

The annual St Vincent de Paul Winter Appeal is on once again, and they are asking the public to give generously to the growing number of needy right here at home.

The Winter Appeal runs from May to August each year to help homeless and disadvantaged people around Australia.
This year's message is "No One Should Have To Know," meaning people shouldn't have to know what living under financial stress and being homeless feels like.
The charity said that Australia wide, the need for assistant has risen to 300%.
The society said that the number is not as high locally, but there has still been an increase due to a rise in rents, power and water bills.
St Vincent de Paul's regional president Phil Sky said that donations had been "a little slower than previous years," but thanked the local clubs, service clubs and public for their generosity.
"Donations to the two local charity bins have slowed, but we would like to see them filled with good clean, warm, pre-loved clothing and blankets thus allowing society to pass them on to those in need," Mr Sky said.
Monetary donations are also helpful to allow clients to purchase general household items.
Mr Sky said that the society is "grateful" to have over 100 volunteers working for St Vincent's, but encourages people in the community that are interested in volunteering to enquire.
"Volunteer numbers are always a little short this time of year due to winter ailements and those travelling north to warmer climates," Mr Sky said.
People wishing to become a volunteer can call the centre to be interviewed, and it is an OH&S requirement that they do manual handling.
All donations may be delivered or posted to the St Vincent's de Paul shop at 93-99 Argent Street.
Clothing bins are also located at the Centro Plaza and near the supermarket in Williams Street.

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White Dam celebrates

Originally published: Friday, 11th June, 2010

It's taken more than 20 years and $50 million but the transformation of a sheep paddock into a gold mine was formally acknowledged yesterday.

The South Australian Minister for Mineral Resources Development, Paul Holloway, cut the ribbon that signalled the White Dam gold mine officially opened in front of about 70 people.
In doing so Minister Holloway acknowledged the benefits the mine would bring to the region.
"Polymetals and Exco Resources are to be congratulated on becoming only the second significant gold mine to open in SA and the state's fourth gold producer," the minister said.
"The White Dam gold mine will bring significant benefits to this region including the employment of local people.
"Forty per cent of Polymetals current work force is local, including staff from Broken Hill, and it (will) generate around $2.8 million in local wages for the life of the project."
Exco Resources has a 75 per cent stake in the project, which is expected to operate for about three years, with Brisbane-based Polymetals Group holding the remaining interest.
Staff, traditional owners, pastoral owners and Exco Resources shareholders were at the mine, 80 kilometres west of Broken Hill, to witness the opening.
The group was given a guided tour of the site with an explanation of how the site had been transformed from a sheep paddock to a mine producing 50,000 ounces of gold per year.
The timing of the mine's production has been impeccable; the gold price reached a new high on Wednesday of $US1251 per ounce as investors looked for safety away from volatile markets.
Exco's managing director Michael Anderson admitted they had been lucky.
"The timing has been superb along the way."
Polymetals chief operating officer Tim Dobson said it had not only been a long time between the discovery of the White Dam deposit, two decades ago, and the first gold pour, back in April, it had at times been a battle against nature.
"A company called Aberfoyle found gold in what's called soil anomalies ... and it's taken 20 years from that point to the point where we had enough confidence to be able to mine it and get a profit out of it," Mr Dobson said.
"It was just 217 days from financing approval to the first gold pour ... (and) in that 217 days we had biblical weather extremes ... through rain, dust and locust plagues, but that didn't stop us and we made a lot of things happen very quickly to get this (mine operational)."
More than $14.3 million has been spent on capital expenditure at White Dam and around five million tonnes of ore will be extracted from the open pit mine over its life.
To date the mine has shifted almost 3.4 million tonnes of ore, stacked almost 900,000 tonnes of material onto the leach pad while 5,765 ounces of gold has been poured.
White Dam uses the heap leach method to extract the precious metal. Microscopic, invisible gold is removed from the ore by irrigating it with a cyanide solution. The gold-infused liquid is then collected in ponds before being treated and made into gold bars weighing about 18 kilograms.

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Way cleared for shopping centre

Originally published: Friday, 11th June, 2010

Leasecorp can go ahead and build its shopping centre in Broken Hill following a decision by the Land and Environment Court yesterday.

The court confirmed that assessment and determination procedures employed by the Broken Hill City Council were consistent with the requirements of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act.
Mayor Wincen Cuy said that Council was now looking forward to the major development and multi-million dollar business investment proceeding.
The proposal, to construct a retail development consisting of a supermarket, department store, discount variety store, 12 specialty shops, kiosk, associated car parking and demolition of existing structures, was granted conditional approval by Council in August 2009.
The development will be on land generally bound by Gossan and Blende streets and South Road.
Centro Plaza's management had lodged an application with the Land and Environment Court seeking to have the consent issued by Council declared invalid.
It also wanted Leasecorp and Broken Hill Developments restrained from acting or relying upon the consent, and had sought costs in the matter.
"It had to be proved to the court that Council had made an error in the manner in which the application was processed or dealt with," said Mayor Cuy.
"Council's processes were placed under intense scrutiny and this decision confirms that those processes were adhered to during the process of this application," he said.
The court has ordered Centro to pay Council's costs.



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Getting together with locals

Originally published: Friday, 11th June, 2010

The GenerationOne project was launched in March and is driving around Australia in a bid to educate the public.
A marquee was set up in the Town Square between 11am and 1pm yesterday, and locals were invited to register their support by putting their details onto a symbolic hand, representing togetherness.
GenerationOne also asked local employers to share their experiences in employing indigenous people and other organisations were being invited to use this as an opportunity to record local successes.
GenerationOne spokesman John McGuire, said the movement was focussed on sustainable employment, education and training for real jobs.
He said indigenous Australians faced poor housing, poor health, short life expectancy and high rates of incarceration.
"We want this to be the last generation that witnesses this disadvantage," he said.
"People have come by this morning and pledged their support. There's been a groundswell of support across the country. The timing is right. People are ready to end the disadvantage," he said.
To register support for the movement visit www.generationone.org.au

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Girl shortage puts ball in jeopardy

Originally published: Thursday, 10th June, 2010

The Civic Ball might be cancelled if more girls wishing to make their debut do not take part.

Planning has started for the 2010 Civic Ball which is scheduled to be held at the Entertainment Centre on September 3.
However unless the required number of girls, a minimum of eight, apply then the ball will not go ahead.
"The Civic Ball is a prestigious event...it would be an absolute disappointment to have it cancelled," said Mayor Wincen Cuy.
Mayor Cuy said that having more girls would create a better atmosphere and that he strongly encouraged more to come forward.
He said there was a lot that goes into being a debutante and that it was something the girls can "look back on and be glad they had done it".
Jusara Caple, a student at Broken Hill High School, hopes to make her debut at the ball and is encouraging other to put their names down.
Jusara said she had wanted to be in a debutante ball ever since she started high school but had not had the chance.
The Civic Ball will be her last chance to become a debutante, she said.
"It's a shame the community can't get behind this event... it may jeopardise future Civic Balls," she said.
Jusara said if girls were interested they should put their names down and see what was involved, because it would be a very enjoyable experience.
Anyone wishing to be a debutante may contact Anne Bransdon at the City Council on 8080 3300.

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Water focus of youth forum

Originally published: Thursday, 10th June, 2010

Environmental sustainability is the main focus of a youth forum which comes to end in the city today.

Senior students from the Willyama and Broken Hill high schools are participating in the two-day event which started yesterday.
It has been organised by the Lower Murray-Darling Catchment Management Authority and the Murray-Darling Association.
The forum will not only identify local environmental concerns but will also seek to gain ideas from the students on how to fix environmental problems in the catchment.
Yesterday the students visited a number of places such as the water treatment plant in Kaolin Street, the Mulga Creek catchment wetlands, the storm water detention basin in Mercury Street and the storm water capture and re-use projects at AJ Keast Park and O'Neill Park.
Forum facilitator, Adrian Wells of the Murray-Darling Association, said the students showed a lot of enthusiasm and interest in environmental issues.
He also said they had a good grasp of the concept of sustainability.
Today the students will take a bus tour to inspect the Darling River, the Menindee Lakes and range lands.
Mr Wells said the CMA had undertaken a new approach towards natural resources management that included the two-day forum and funding given to Broken Hill High School to develop a natural resource management project.
Funding was also given to Menindee Central School to develop a project. Money will also be shared between Wilcannia Central School and Ivanhoe Central School.
With a focus on making an active contribution to the environment, the students will report their findings to the CMA.
Mr Wells said school students had a great deal to offer catchment management.
"The insights, optimism and enthusiasm of students need to be captured and harnessed and used to improve the catchment's natural resources," he said.

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Water fund untapped

Originally published: Thursday, 10th June, 2010

The South Australian politicians who toured the Menindee Lakes this week said they were unaware of some of the intricacies of the system.

But the group's leader, Deputy Opposition Leader Mitch Williams, said their message was still the same: evaporation had to be addressed.
"We do have a better understanding," Mr Williams said.
"I guess one of the things we weren't as aware of before we got there was how the system is managed to stop flooding and water losses.
"The river will overflow out onto the flood plains, into billabongs etc., and (is managed) by putting water into the lakes.
"My biggest concern remains the large sum of money (given for water savings measures) ... and no money has been expended."
The visit was a fact-finding mission for the South Australians who were angry about the handling of the recent floodwaters from Queensland.
It included the Shadow Environment Minister Michelle Lensink, Shadow Agricultural Minister Adrian Pederick, Member for Chaffey Tim Whetstone and Shadow Parliamentary Secretary for the Murray-Darling Basin Simon Birmingham.
State Water hosted the visitors and gave them an overview of the lakes and a tour of the main weir, Lake Pamamaroo and various regulators.
Before the visit, Mr Williams said that $400 million pledged for water savings measures on the lakes had not been spent.
The recent floods saw water flow into the all the lakes, including Lake Menindee, while lakes downstream remained dry.
But he said while it was easy for those in SA to point the finger upstream, he believed that Broken Hill and SA's needs were the same.
"The main message from South Australia's point of view is that our best interests are served by getting the same outcomes as Broken Hill needs," Mr Williams said.
"I'm quite angry that (the money hasn't been spent) because water is evaporating.
"There was $25 million on consultants but we still have no answer.
"We would certainly like the money to be spent so that all of the lakes can be emptied.
"A lot of that water can never be reclaimed; that is dead storage in Lake Menindee."
Mr Williams said the lakes being 80 per cent full was no excuse to not start work and that work could still be done managing water efficiency.
"Planning work could be started. Regulator work ... between Lake Menindee and Lake Cawndilla, some of this work can be started," he said.
"The outlet for Lake Cawndilla could be done and constructed and regulator work can be done next time the lakes are emptied out."
Mr Williams said he did speak to some locals, who were sceptical of their intentions.
But he said South Australia wanted the same thing the locals did; for work to be done on the lakes to minimise water losses.
"Some of the people were a little almost aggro and thought that we held the attitude that all the water should've gone to South Australia," Mr Williams said.
"But the people we've been talking to about what we're calling for are of the same opinion - get that money spent and increase the inefficiency of the system.
"It would provide a win-win for all the stakeholders in the Menindee Lakes, Broken Hill, irrigators."

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Sunraysia footy gathering

Originally published: Thursday, 10th June, 2010

The city's junior footballers will take on a host of interstate rivals this weekend at the Sunraysia Junior AFL Carnival.

Three local teams (Under 11, 13 and 15) will be making the trip to compete at the carnival, and will face off against teams from Riverland, the Mid-Murray district and Mildura.
The Under 11 side was victorious at the carnival last year, and all three teams will be hoping to emulate that success.
The teams will be coached by Terry Mutch (Under 11), Tony Tiziani and Dean Martin (Under 13), and Kym Ferguson (Under 15).
Mr Mutch said the trip would be a great test of skill for all players involved.
"All sides have been in training for the last five weeks, and we should be very competitive in all three grades. It is a great opportunity to represent Broken Hill.
"With some very talented juniors coming through next year the Broken Hill Junior Football Association will hopefully have a lot more representative games which will benefit the juniors.

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Silverlea really helps

Originally published: Wednesday, 9th June, 2010

Local mum Brenda Wylie wants to let everyone know about the work Silverlea does for autistic children after her son's diagnosis last year.

Four-year-old Makay Brooks was diagnosed last year by several doctors in Adelaide and Roxby Downs.
With the services that Silverlea provide, Makay has been able to live quite a normal life and his mother Brenda is grateful for its help.
"We kind of want to lift the stigma on Silverlea and tell people that they are there to help you," Ms Wylie said.
Makay has attended Silverlea since August last year, and also attends North School which has an early intervention program.
Ms Wylie said Leslie Harvey, the co-ordinator of the Silverlea Early Childhood Service had helped both her son and other family members.
Leslie Harvey said she had 17 children in her group that deals with children who have mental delays.
"We have five to six kids between the ages of two and five years who have been diagnosed with autism," she said.
Ms Harvey said she had seen varying results in the children's overall behavior, but nothing dramatically different.
Silverlea also deals with children who have cerebral palsy and other mental delay illnesses.

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Community plans identified

Originally published: Wednesday, 9th June, 2010

Max Potential students yesterday began outlining plans for their community projects which will be presented in September.

Lions Youth of the Year, Hannah Licul, is just one of the students who, with the help of her coach Courtney Malthouse, will be presenting one of the many projects.
Hannah said that one of the benefits of having Ms Malthouse coach her through her project was "having her there to always push me."
Ms Malthouse, who works for Country Energy, is helping Hannah devise a project amed at giving potential army cadets more information on the defence force.
The assignment is based on an interest Hannah would like to pursue in the future.
"I have nothing set as to what I want to do, but I'd like to enter the defence force," she said.
While the coaches help the students during the sessions, coaches also get taught themselves, said Max Potential's project manager Kirsten Brumby.
"And it really benefits them too because they can take what they learn back into their workplace," Ms Brumby said.
Eighteen students from the Broken Hill and Willyama high schools and Menindee Central School have been taking part in the program aimed at teaching students about leadership.
Ms Brumby said that the students had a diverse range of projects that they were drawing up.
"We have one student setting up a self esteem exercise day for year 10s and 11s, as well as another going into a retirement village for the day to learn about the past and lessons those people have learnt."
Students have already engaged in at least five sessions with their coaches since early this year, with each being held at the city's various clubs.

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Beware the big chill

Originally published: Wednesday, 9th June, 2010

The RSPCA is asking locals to remember their pets as the big chill of winter hits home.
Dr Doug Dixon-Hughes, a vet at the RSPCA, said the key to keeping pets warm is to ask “would I feel comfortable in this
temperature?”.
“Get down on their level and make sure it isn’t too cold,” said Dr Dixon-Hughes.
“Have an appropriate amount of bedding...make sure the bed is thick and off the ground.”
He said cat owners should make sure their pets are inside at night or at the very least provided with an enclosed shelter.
He also encouraged dog owners to use kennels as it gave dogs a “warmish place to go”.
Older pets need more care because they struggle to warm themselves in winter and Dr Dixon- Hughes said electric
mattresses were available for older ones.
According to Dr Graham Swinney, President of the Australian Small Animal Veterinary Association, there were a number of
things people could do to help their pets cope with
the cold.
These include making sure they had somewhere warm to sleep, free of draughts and protected from the elements, and keeping pets inside when the temperature drops.
Dr Swinney also stressed the importance of making sure pets with arthritis were well looked after.
During the colder months some are likely to need more food as they burn more energy to stay warm, particularly dogs with short coats.
It’s also important to keep exercising pets throughout winter to keep them moving.
On another note, Dr Dixon-Hughes said the response to the BDT article on June 1 about the RSPCA needing blankets for their animals had been “enormous” and that he wished to thank
everyone who helped with donations.
“People are bringing in lots of good things and it’s nice to see they care,” he said.

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Locals' bold showing

Originally published: Wednesday, 9th June, 2010

The Barrier girls soccer team has gained the attention of State PSSA officials with a spirited showing at the recent NSW PSSA Soccer Carnival in Bateau Bay. The girls travelled 1,200km to take part in the carnival, which got off to an unusual start after days of heavy rain forced games to be moved to a smaller indoor venue. The change in venue resulted in games being played in a reduced format, forcing the girls to adapt to playing an unfamiliar style of soccer. “Most of our girls had never played a game of indoor soccer before,” said team coach Troy Perkins. “Instead of 11 players on a field, we now had only five players on a court. It was a big learning curve but we all adjusted really well.” The Barrier girls competed against primary school teams selected from zones across NSW such as Riverina, South Coast, and various Sydney metropolitan areas. Stand out players for Barrier included the sweeper/centre back combination of Jamie Dickson (Burke Ward) and Anna Vartuli (Baronga), and goalie Ainsley Files (Morgan Street). “Ainsley must have saved over 50 goals with the gloves,” said Mr Perkins. “Together this strong and resilient defence ensured that goals conceded were kept to a minimum.” In attack Sydney King (Morgan Street) had a consistent carnival and scored a memorable goal, while Georgia Pearce (Alma) and Indianna Paull (Burke Ward) impressed through the midfield and demanded respect from their bigger opponents. Barrier’s best player for the carnival was Morgan Street’s Jasmine Simmons, who led the team’s goal scoring tally and produced numerous attacking runs. “Jasmine was our most significant player and team leader for 2010,” said Mr Perkins. “She won the attention and respect of players and coaches from all regions of NSW. “Jasmine scored four classic goals over the tournament and made many explosive breakaways.” The talented youngster’s outstanding carnival caught the eye of selectors, and almost clinched a place in the NSW State team. Jasmine was selected amongst the top 22 players in the State, which were then broken into two teams of 11 to play off in a final selection game. Members of the Barrier team stood in pouring rain to cheer on their teammate in the final game, however Jasmine just missed out on making the final team. Mr Perkins said she was unlucky to have missed out and praised all his players for their consistent application throughout the carnival. The girls’ efforts bolstered Barrier’s standing in the PSSA State competition, and the team’s improvement was noted by rival coaches, Mr Perkins said. “At the PSSA soccer managers’ meeting all parties recognised how the whole Barrier squad has moved forward in leaps and bounds since this time last year. “It just shows how strong girls’ soccer is becoming in our region. “We are so pleased that all our training and hard work paid off, well done to everyone involved.” Mr Perkins thanked Barrier team Manager Helen Files, Skills and Development Coach Grant Smith, and all the local sponsors who made the trip possible.

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Doctor's reality check

Originally published: Tuesday, 8th June, 2010

Wilcannia's school students have been told they can be whatever they want when they grow up by a group of indigenous doctors who did just that.

The board of the Australian Indigenous Doctors' Association (AIDA) met in Wilcannia on Friday. Members took the chance to visit the local school and hospital.
AIDA promotes Aboriginal health and encourages indigenous people to enter the medical professions. As well as working to create more indigenous doctors, AIDA hopes to make non-indigenous doctors more aware of their patients' issues.
AIDA President, Associate Professor Peter O'Mara, said the board travelled for two meetings a year as a way of interacting with the community.
There were about 140 indigenous doctors in Australia at present, he said, and about the same amount of medical students.
"It's important to us to meet with the kids," Prof O'Mara said.
"It sounds like we want to make more doctors, and we do, but we also want to let the kids know that they can be whatever they want," he said.
"When I was a kid no-one came to my school and told me that.
"The indigenous doctors we have now, none of them just said 'I want to be a doctor'. It's not until they learn of another Aboriginal doctor that they even think it's possible.
"I saw two Aboriginal doctors be interviewed on TV and that's when I thought I could do it."
The AIDA board's Student Director Sean White was a part of the visit, and it meant even more to him. His mother was Barkindji and was born and raised in Wilcannia. He attended school there briefly, visited there a number of times and still has strong family ties.
"I caught up with some older people there, as well as the kids," he said.
"While I was there I was wondering what mum would have thought about there being so many Aboriginal doctors there at the same time. It never would have crossed her mind that it could happen."
Mr White said it was important that isolated children be told that they have not been forgotten.
"I was just like these kids and I had the opportunity to choose my career path. They can do it too," he said.
The group also visited the Wilcannia Health Service. Mr White said it was great to see the hospital, where his mother was born, from the other side.
"I've visited family there as patients. This time I got to look at the good work they're doing and the strong relationship they have with Maari Ma," he said.

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Choir anniversary celebrations

Originally published: Tuesday, 8th June, 2010

The Queen's Birthday weekend will be one of music for Broken Hill Community Voices as they celebrate their 10th anniversary.

On Saturday the Community Voices choir will be performing at the Trades Hall and the Palace Hotel.
They will be performing for the public at the Trades Hall from 3pm to 3.30pm and at the Palace in the evening.
It presents a great opportunity to see inside the hall and to listen to the choir singing traditional union songs, amongs others.
Entry to this event is by donation.
Money raised on the weekend will be donated to the Trades Hall Trust to help with the upkeep of the historic building.
In addition to these public events, the choir will be holding reunions for past and present members on Friday night and Sunday afternoon.

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SA wants our water story

Originally published: Tuesday, 8th June, 2010

A group of South Australian Shadow Ministers will tour the Menindee Lakes system today and get the facts from the people on this side of the border.

The group, led by Deputy Leader of the SA Opposition Mitch Williams, are here on an invitation from Broken Hill City Council.
Mr Williams is accompanied by Shadow Minister for Environment and Conservation Michelle Lensink, Opposition Whip and Member for Hammond Adrian Pederick, Member for Chaffey Tim Whetstone, Senator Simon Birmingham and Shadow Parliamentary Secretary for the Murray Darling Basin Leonie Williams.
Yesterday they visited Country Water's treatment plant and yesterday evening were to meet with Council's water resources working group and have dinner with the Mayor.
Mr Williams said Council's invitation came in the middle of the election campaign. With that behind him he gladly accepted.
"I told some people that I was coming and some hands went up, and here we are," he said.
"I guess we're taking up the opportunity to talk to Council and find the relevant issues for Broken Hill's water supply.
Mr Williams said the Menindee Lakes were "very important to us in South Australia".
"They certainly are a political football," he said.
"We in SA are concerned the monies earmarked by the Howard Government and taken as a priority by the Rudd Government are still sitting there.
"We feel the time for major structural works on the lakes were when it was dry. Now it's flooded it's too late. We'll have to wait for the next drought now. That's frustrating."
SA irrigators and farmers were seeing their businesses collapse under the weight of water shortages, he said, and rankled at reports of "hundreds of gigalitres being lost to evaporation and dead storage".
"I want to be on the ground and see it for myself. I question the wisdom of filling Lake Menindee itself, especially given that the water making it down is less than expected," he said.
Mr Williams said he fully appreciated the social and environmental aspects of the lakes for the region - as it mirrored SA's relationship with the lower lakes. But he did not agree that Lake Menindee should have been filled.

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Local ready for Finke challenge

Originally published: Tuesday, 8th June, 2010

Local off-road driver Scott Dalby will join South Australia’s state champion James Madden in the 2010 Finke Challenge. This will be Scott’s second run at the Finke, the first time being in the bike classes. James Madden and the Razorback Racing Team haven’t stopped working since returning from the first round of the Australian Championship at the ARB Pinjarra Engineering Hyden 450 at Easter. Some maintenance was needed in the engine department after the new six cylinder turbo Subaru motor was damaged in the WA race. James has had to refit his trusty 2.7L WRX engine and the team has poured over 200 hours of labour into the number 81 Proclass buggy to return it to “as new” condition for their assault on the Finke Desert Race. James has competed in the event for the past 10 years with mixed results. Last year a shredded cam belt ended the chance to better his 2008 result of 7th outright and 5th in class. This year his aim is to complete each run in under two hours. “We have been close before and with Scott’s help in the navigating duties and the refined package, I hope to finish the event in under four 4 hours total which would get us well in the top ten,” said James. “This year we will have three Pro buggies and two Pro-lites and they are all running in the top fifteen in their classes.” The race will take place this Sunday and Monday in Alice Springs. Live updates will be posted on the race’s official webpage.

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Dumb and Dumber on an outback mission

Originally published: Monday, 7th June, 2010

Dumb and Dumber are on a mission to help the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

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Safe house dilemma

Originally published: Monday, 7th June, 2010

A program that cited Wilcannia’s housing shortage
as a central issue and then promised to supply
two new homes by the end of this month now says
they’ll be a year late because of a “property shortage”.
The Federal Government promised last year that it
would construct or purchase the two ‘safe houses’ so
that people fleeing domestic violence had somewhere
safe to go.
It also said it would build or buy another four houses,
due for completion by July 2011.
The promises were part of the Remote Service
Delivery Program (RSDP), a $300 million plan targeting
Indigenous disadvantage, which identified Wilcannia’s
lack of housing as a central issue for the community.
But work on the two safe houses, that were to be ready
in just three weeks’ time, has not started.
The local RSDP co-ordinator Kevin McNamara told
the BDT recently that he had never heard of the plan,
while Housing NSW, which was to supply the properties,
said on Thursday that a shortage of housing meant the
houses would not be available until next July.
It also appears only three houses will be built instead
of the promised six.
“Due to a property shortage within the Wilcannia
region, Housing NSW will undertake construction of one
safe house and two transition houses to address the stated
intention made in the Co-ordinator General’s report,” a
NSW Housing Department spokesman said.
“The three properties are due for completion in July
2011.”
The co-ordinator general Brian Gleeson said in his
six-month report in December that “two houses will be
purchased in 2009/10 to function as transition housing
for people escaping domestic violence”.
In addition Mr Gleeson said a “new safe house will
be built by the NSW Government by June 2011 ... two
further transition houses will be completed in 2010-11
... and funds under the Remote Indigenous Housing
National partnership will also be used to build one house
in Wilcannia in 2010-11”.
Mr Gleeson said, as a follow up to issues affecting
Wilcannia, “my office will be closely monitoring the
progression of housing as well as housing repairs and
maintenance”.
He also said freehold land would be purchased to
allow for the projected houses by June 30 but that has
not happened as Housing NSW said it was still looking
at options for freehold land purchases.
The RSDP was designed to ‘close the gap’ between
Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.
When Federal Indigenous Affairs Minister Jenny
Macklin announced the program in April last year she
said it would be a revolution in service delivery targeting
disadvantage.

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Big hits as academy tennis camp convenes

Originally published: Monday, 7th June, 2010

A selection of the best young tennis players from around Western NSW converged on the city over the weekend for a Far West Academy of Sport (FWAS) training camp. The tennis squad featured players from Broken Hill and a number of other regional centres including Nyngan, Menindee, Brewarrina and Coonabarabran. Players took part in a number of drills on Saturday with FWAS head coach Ken Wray focusing on shot selection, footwork and agility. A series of trial games were then played yesterday. FWAS development off icer Matthew Thompson said a number of the players had never been to Broken Hill and were relishing the opportunity to play and live in a team environment. The players are all staying together while in the city and undertaking all training and sightseeing as a group. “The training aspect is obviously good for their skill development, but also staying (together) as a squad is good for their personal development,” Mr Thompson said. “Tennis is a very individual sport so it’s always good for the kids to do things as a squad, we’ll also be doing some cultural stuff and sightseeing. “They’re all having a great time and enjoying the chance to catch up with their friends and play some tennis.” Mr Thompson said the FWAS had enjoyed the opportunity to visit Broken Hill, and encouraged any talented juniors who wanted assistance with specialist training in their chosen sport to contact the Academy on (02) 6847 3638. “It’s fantastic to get out to another city that we don’t often get the chance to visit, and we’ll be keeping an eye out for other talented athletes in any other sports. If anyone wants to get involved with the academy they can give us a call.” Broken Hill Tennis Association president Peter Keenan thanked Mr Wray and his team for the visit and predicted a bright future for local junior tennis. “We’re extremely the happy the Academy has come out to Broken Hill and we can participate, and they’re enthusiastic that we’re involved,” Mr Keenan said. “It’s great to see four local kids in the squad, and there’s a number of other kids who are very close to also being making it. “We’ve got some good juniors showing great potential here with tennis, and if any other kids want to play the junior competition will be restarting in September.”

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Lowest paid to get a helping hand

Originally published: Friday, 4th June, 2010

The city’s lowest paid workers will receive a boost in their pay packets from the beginning of next month.
Fair Work Australia announced yesterday that workers on the minimum wage, including those in the childcare, hospitality
and retail sectors, would receive a $26 per week increase.
The change will move the $544 minimum wage to $570 per week effective from July 1.
Tiani Honson, a sales assistant at Sampsons, said the rise was welcome and would put a little extra in her pocket.
“Great. It’ll be good. I can buy more shoes,” the 21-year-old said.
Ms Honson said she had a number of big financial commitments that the extra money would help pay for.
“I’m planning my wedding and any extra will help,” she said.
“I’m also paying off my own home and it will help with the repayments.”
She said any extra money was good, especially with prices of so many things going up.
“Food, electricity, I own a car, petrol, tyres - the
lot.”

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South Football Club Debutante Ball

Originally published: Friday, 4th June, 2010

Eleven young ladies will make their debut at the Entertainment
Centre this weekend.
The South Football Club is holding its annual Debutante Ball tomorrow where the debutantes will be presented to Guest of
Honour, Phillip Neal.

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Evitt's Golden Anniversary

Originally published: Friday, 4th June, 2010

A local couple who met 54 years ago at school are today celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary.
Brian Evitts and Christine Smith met and starting dating while they were both at the Broken Hill High School.
“It was my good looks that attracted her,” Mr Evitts said.
Four years later they were married at the Methodist Church when he was 20 and she was 18.
“One of us fainted three times, and it wasn’t me,” laughed Mrs Evitts.
The couple have two children, Cindy and Brett.
They also have seven grandchildren; Rock, Rhiannon, Siobhan, Brayden, Lyndall, Casey and Luke.
“They are the highlight of our life at the moment, and we are not wealthy people, but our wealth is our family, they are our
riches,” Mrs Evitts said.
“We are currently following one of our grandchildren on Facebook as they travel the world.”
Brian and Christine also revealed the secret to such a lasting relationship.

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North bowlers claim penant

Originally published: Friday, 4th June, 2010

The final round of the pennant season was played on Tuesday at the Zinc Green in fine and sunny conditions, with good sportsmanship prevailing throughout.

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Children's lead level reminder

Originally published: Thursday, 3rd June, 2010

A jump in the lead levels of children in Port Pirie has prompted
health officials to remind local parents to get their kids tested.
While the official blood lead levels (BLL) for children in Broken Hill show that about 80 per cent are in the safe range, the Child
and Family Health Centre want more children to be tested.
“It is a voluntary program
and it’s free,” manager
Dianne Johnson said.
“Our aim is to get all
children to get an annual
lead test from seven
months (to) four years
old.”
The South Australian
government said it was
concerned by a report
released yesterday that
showed a 12 per cent
increase in Port Pirie children
aged between zero
and four years who have
above recommended BLL.
SA Health Minister
John Hill said in the first
quarter of 2010 the percentage
of children in
that age group with a
BLL lower than the World
Health Organisation’s
official level of concern
of 10 5g/dL (micrograms
per decilitre) was 56.6 per
cent. That was down from
68.5 per cent in the corresponding
quarter of 2009.
But Ms Johnson said
kids in Broken Hill would
never have that amount
of lead contamination as
the city does not have a
smelter.
“Port Pirie has a smelter
so the children’s exposure
to lead is in a different
way - it’s airborne,” Ms
Johnson said.
“We won’t have the
same level because we
don’t have a smelter (and)
the smelter is the issue.”
The latest figures for
Broken Hill, data taken
from 2008, show a steady
decrease in the number of
children being tested since
the mid-1990s but that
also corresponded with a
steady decrease in BLL.
In 2008, 108 children
under the age of 12 months
were screened with 99.1
per cent in the safe level,
with a mean BLL of 3.2
g/dL.
The 2007 results showed
that 122 babies were
screened with a mean lead
level of 3.5 g/dL.
Meanwhile 361 children
between one and four
years of age were screened
in 2008 with a mean BLL
of 4.9g/dL, down from
5.8g/dL in 2007 when 458
were screened.
Ms Johnson said the
decrease was probably
attributable to parents
becoming complacent,
believing that lead was not
a major concern, despite it
effecting the child’s brain.
“We’re not sure people
actually see lead as a big
issue,” she said.
“The baby gets a good
result and the (parents)
don’t think they have to
worry.”
She said newcomers
to the city may also not
be aware of lead health
issues.Ms Johnson said in
October 2008 a new lead
test was introduced and
children now only needed
a finger prick with results
available instantly.
“That really helped us
because we increased the
number of babies we were
getting by 60 per cent.”
Ms Johnson said if children
did have a higher than
desired lead level then the
centre would assess their
living environment.
“We talk with the family
about ways to minimise
lead exposure,” she said.
“Diet is very important
for children and their
uptake of lead (and we recommend)
a normal health
environment of five (vegetables)
and two (fruits)
per day.”
Children can have a free
test on Monday from 10-
1pm and Tuesday 1.30pm
to 4.15pm by appointment
at the Child and Family
Health Centre.

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Exhibition opening tomorrow night

Originally published: Thursday, 3rd June, 2010

The BH Regional Art Gallery opens a new exhibition tomorrow
night based around three talented artists.
The exhibition will feature the work of photographers Robert McFarlane and Boris Hlavica, and artist Amanda Johnson.
Since the 1960s, Robert McFarlane has been an influential figure in Australian photography, covering the Beatles arrival in Sydney and the political campaigns of former PM Bob Hawke. McFarlane also creates personal and moving social portraits of
Australian society.
Local Boris Hlavica arrived here in 2003 and set up as an outback photographer, undertaking commercial work in many areas, including commissions for the NSW National Parks and
Wildlife as well as operating a private gallery.
His new exhibition “Changing Places” interprets his journey to Broken Hill from the Czech Republic via Melbourne.
Amanda Johnson has taught and practised as an artist in the city for the past 30 years, while running her own commercial
gallery.
Her new exhibition “Home Town” captures her feelings and impressions of everyday life in this outback city.
“At the moment I am interested in painting the everyday of my life.

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Russian's re-examines roo's

Originally published: Thursday, 3rd June, 2010

The local kangaroo industry could be bolstered as the Russian
Trade Commissioner visits a Queensland kangaroo processing
plant next week.
The co-owner of the city’s meat processing plant, Kaye Brown, said the visit was a positive step for the industry which has been struggling after ‘roo meat exports to Russia were
cancelled following a contamination scare about 12 months ago.
“It’s certainly a positive
step. Every move that
anyone can make to make
... to open up Russia will
be great,” Origin Game
Meats’ Ms Brown said.
The QLD rural lobby
group, AgForce, will host
Commissioner Yuri
Aleshin and hopes to
convince him that
Australian kangaroo meat
is safe to go back onto
Russian plates.
“We want kangaroos
back on the appetite of
the Russians,” AgForce
sheep and wool president
Brett Finlay told AAP.
Mr Finlay said the
industry had introduced
new training regimes, a
new traceability regime
and other measures to
win back the Russians’
confidence.
“The industry has had
a very significant look at
itself, look at the production
system,” he said.
Ms Brown said the
changes made to the
industry were done
across the board.
“The regulations have
been brought in
Australia-wide so the
changes made in QLD
have also been made in
NSW,” she said.
“There is a lot more
monitoring of temperature
controls now, they’re
much stricter about temperature
control.”
Ms Brown said temperature
monitoring was
done both at the chiller
boxes, mobile refrigerated
units located at various
places around the
region, and back in the
meat works.
“Carcasses come down
to temperature within 24
hours and they must
maintain temperature all
the way through. And it’s
quicker now from carcass
to carton.”
The closing of the
Russian market saw the
local meat works, then
owned by a different
company, close its doors
putting more than 50
workers out of a job.
The meat works was
subsequently re-opened
by Origin Game Meats,
which now employs
around 25 people.
Ms Brown said the
reopening of the Russian
market would be a boon
for the industry.
“It would have a significant
positive impact for
our business and the
industry as a whole,” she
said.
“The Russian market is
a huge market.
“Other processors in
the industry would benefit
and that flows through
to the harvesters.
“Prices would pick up
too.”
Ms Brown said recent
rains had not yet seen a
big increase in ‘roo numbers
but that in the medium
to long term the
market was looking good.
“We’re probably aren’t
seeing huge numbers yet,
but the rain will have a
positive impact,” she
said.
“The medium to long
term prospects are excellent.
There are great conditions
for raising big,
healthy animals.”
Meanwhile Ms Brown
said that there had been
no further developments
on a ‘roo trade with
China despite the Federal
Minister for Agriculture,
Tony Burke, signing off
on a deal earlier this year.
“If we can get into
China it would be very
good for us and for the
industry as a whole,” Ms
Brown said.
Currently the local
works is processing kangaroo
and venison for
both the domestic and
overseas market.

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Greyhounds giveaway

Originally published: Thursday, 3rd June, 2010

Local children have a chance to win a new bicycle at the local greyhound racing meeting this weekend.

+ Read article

Explorers dig in

Originally published: Wednesday, 2nd June, 2010

A Queensland exploration company will spend more than $8 million this year trying to scope out one billion tonnes of iron ore south of the city.

Carpentaria Exploration said if drilling on its Hawsons Iron project, 60 kilometres south of Broken Hill, went as planned it could develop a huge magnetite iron mine within four years.
"We are confident of developing this discovery for the benefit of all stakeholders," executive chairman Nick Sheard said.
As part of a $81 million deal with Bonython Metals Group (BMG), Carpentaria announced yesterday that it had received a further $4 million which will be used to explore one tenement at Hawsons - Burta.
Under the Burta agreement, Carpentaria will manage the exploration, resource drilling and pre-feasibility study.
Mr Sheard said the money was part of a six-week $13m staged payment from BMG.
Of that, $8m would be used for exploration, resources drilling and a pre-feasibility study on Burta with a goal of defining up to one billion tonnes of inferred iron ore resources.
"Initial drilling at Burta is targeting the priority magnetite targets to define the prospects for follow up resource drilling," Mr Sheard said.
He said the remaining $5m will be used to explore other interests around the city, including the Euriowie tin discovery, north east of Broken Hill, the Panama Hat gold project and the MacDougalls hematite project, north of the city.
"Carpentaria and its JV partners are committing a record $10 million in exploration spending on Carpentaria's projects this year."
Mr Sheard, who is this week visiting a number of the company's Broken Hill tenements, said yesterday's cash showed further commitment from BMG.
"The funding is an important boost for the project's progression to potential development, adding confidence in the discovery of a new magnetite iron province near Broken Hill," he said.
"BMG has proved a loyal and extremely supportive partner, and we are pleased with the progress made on our joint venture since its formation on April 20, 2010."
Meanwhile Mr Sheard yesterday visited the Euriowie tin deposit, 50km north-east of Broken Hill. The company has applied to have an exploration licence granted at the old mine site.


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Kelly's tales proving popular

Originally published: Wednesday, 2nd June, 2010

Local aspiring children's book author Kellie Coff is now one of the top five short story authors on the popular website "Smories".

Smories holds three competitions over three months and each month a winner is announced.
Last month, Kellie Coff finished in the top from more than 1000 entrants.
Mrs Coff said the website is somewhere kids can safely visit and hear other children read the stories.
"The website is screened by a mum and dad, so it's completely safe," she said.
"The website also doesn't edit out kids' stumbling or making a mistake to make kids aware that it's okay to make mistakes, and it really boosts their confidence."
The people who submit their stories to the webpage also still hold onto the rights, so they still own their work if they want to approach a publisher.
Mrs Coff has links to her video stories on her website, along with information about herself and her work.
The webpage is visit www.kelliecoff.com.


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Spider warning

Originally published: Wednesday, 2nd June, 2010

A local man who was bitten by a white tailed spider three years ago is asking people to be more careful when out in their yards.

John Pope was bitten in October 2007 in his garden. He was wearing overalls and boots and said that he didn't feel it bite him or see it.
But later the pain got worse, he said, and his wife had to wake him up every two hours during the night to apply cream to the sores that had formed on his legs, arms and back.
"It felt like a painful toothache had taken to my body," Mr Pope said.
After trying many different medications, he said the only thing that helped his wounds was a concentrated mixture of water and bleach in his bath tub.
"I just want to make people aware that these things are out there, and there's a lot of others in town who have gone through what I have," Mr Pope said.
He said common surface spray insecticide will kill the spider which is usually found in and around homes.
"One night my wife was about to get into bed and she found a white tail in between the doona and the blanket, but since we've used the surface spray, they haven't been back since."

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Vital match for Central, West

Originally published: Wednesday, 2nd June, 2010

Game one tonight will see West take on Central in a vital match for both clubs.

Let's hope the Magpies can field a side because if they can get over West tonight it will give them a two-game buffer against the Robins on the ladder.
The whole Central Football Club needs to get behind the Under 18 team as their season could unravel if they start forfeiting on a regular basis.
They must get some of the Under 16 players into the squad. The likes of Jake Gepp, Zayden White, Sean Power, Lachlan Jenkin and Ethan Williams, to name a few, have proved they can match it at this level.
The regular Under 18 Magpies have all played well this season with Curtis Jelbert, Jack McInness, Alec Bray, Bryce Bessel, Jesse Coombe, Jack Roberts and Chevez Hocking all in good form. But they need support.
This game could be season-defining for West. Lose this and it will be difficult make the top three and play finals as they will be two games behind.
Scoring goals has been a major concern for West all season and they will need to find someone to stand up and kick some. They have plenty of play in the midfield but just can't convert chances.
Jono Naden, Nathan Kickett, Nick Agius, Brett Martin, Danny Gray and Heath Teelow are all capable of troubling the scorers and will need to get at least 10 to 12 goals between them to keep West's season alive.
With everything on the line and an unpredictable Central line-up I'm tipping West to get the points.
GAME TWO is shaping up as match of the year to date.
North have been in tremendous form in the last month and will take a lot of confidence into this game.
Jordan Tonkin, Dylan Stuart, Justin Spratt, Tobias Hack, Zac Wauchope, Davin Bates and Kale Grundy form the basis of a very good side.
It's no surprise that the Bulldog's resurgence has come from a complete team effort with the likes of Jackson Pryor, Ryan Lehman, Lachlan Hobba and Kyle Schipanski all finding form in the last month.
If the Bulldogs are to cause an upset they will need to shut down South's dominance in the mid-field.
Cody Schorn, Todd Davidson, Marc Purcell and Tom Derham are all stars of this grade. Throw in the ruck work of Aiden Pettit, the brilliance of Heath Caldwell and Riley Elliott plus the versatile Tyson Boland and it's no wonder they are undefeated.
It's hard to find a weakness in the South camp. Maybe the fact that they haven't really been tested might be the key.
If North can somehow manage to be level-pegging come the last term you just never know what might happen. The problem is getting to that stage.
This should be an amazing contest with South hard to tip against.
I encourage the public to head the Jubilee Oval tonight to see the cream of teenage football on display in a game that could be a dress rehearsal for bigger honours later in the season.

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RSPCA wants to keep animals warm

Originally published: Tuesday, 1st June, 2010

The RSPCA is in desperate need of second-hand blankets.

With winter now well and truly here, everyone needs a warm bed and that includes the animals at the South road shelter.
Elaine Colbeck, an animal attendant at the shelter, is asking for donations of any old blankets, towels, sheets or pillows.
Ms Cobeck said anything that will keep animals warm on cold nights would be very welcome.
Over the years locals have donated lots of blankets but, she said, these get destroyed very quickly due to dogs chewing them or playing with them.
All donations would be greatly appreciated and may be dropped off at the RSPCA.


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Hospital volunteers recognised

Originally published: Tuesday, 1st June, 2010

Tribute was paid to local hospital volunteers yesterday.

The Broken Hill Health Service gave thanks to its volunteers with a morning tea to celebrate their efforts.
Health service general manager Mr Rod Wyber-Hughes said the morning tea was about recognising the input and effort of volunteers.
He said without help from about 90 volunteers the health service couldn't provide the services it does.
He said volunteers support staff, run the kiosk and the day care centre, and include official visitors for the mental health service and Telecross.
Mr Wyber-Hughes made special mention of the work of Mrs Pam Lord.
Mrs Lord, who has been volunteering for 45 years, visits patients flown in by the Royal Flying Doctor Service, especially those who are away from their family and friends.
"I do all the things a family member would do, if they were there...this includes shopping, writing letters or just sitting with them," she said.
Mr Wyber-Hughes personally thanked all the volunteers for their work.
He said it benefits the whole community by trying to make the health service the "best it can be".
The volunteers were given a small gift from the health service as a token of thanks.

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New bugles for band

Originally published: Tuesday, 1st June, 2010

The Legion Club has donated three new bugles to the BIU Band so that newcomers may be taught how to play the instrument.

Legion Club president Bill Graham hopes that local children especially will take it up.
"We're hoping that local kids will learn the bugle and be able to play it at Anzac Day both here and in other towns such as Menindee," Mr Graham said.
The secretary of the BIU Band, Ross Mawby, is one of the few buglers still left in town and he is encouraging others to learn.
"Boys and girls and adults as well are welcome to give it a go and see whether or not they like it. I'm happy to teach them," Mr Mawby said.
Anyone wishing to learn may contact Ross Mawby on (08) 8087 9887 or send the band an e-mail to secretary@biuband.com.au.


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