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News archive

This is an archive containing every news story ever posted on the BDT website. If you’re looking for a specific article, try the search box at the top right hand side of this page. Otherwise you can just browse the archive by selecting a year and month below.

September, 2010

Kebabs kept out of court

Originally published: Thursday, 30th September, 2010

City Council is hoping to sort out its Late Night Kebab problems without resorting to legal action.

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Service remembers fallen officers

Originally published: Thursday, 30th September, 2010

Tribute was paid yesterday to police officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty at the local Remembrance Day Service.

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Creativity of city shaped ‘my passion’

Originally published: Thursday, 30th September, 2010

Melanie Vugich is a Broken Hill woman who has worked with some big fashion names in Italy.

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Peas produce unusual, beautiful blooms

Originally published: Wednesday, 29th September, 2010

Sturt’s Desert Peas usually flower from late spring through to summer and autumn, and this year they are blooming earlier than usual and in full force.

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Work begins on storm damaged park

Originally published: Wednesday, 29th September, 2010

Council has started a redevelopment of the storm damaged Duff Street Park.

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Silverton committee up for state award

Originally published: Wednesday, 29th September, 2010

The Silverton Village Community Reserve Trust is one of three finalists in the running for a major land and property management award next month.

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Another $1.4m for flood repair

Originally published: Wednesday, 29th September, 2010

Flood damaged roads of the Central Darling Shire have been provided with a further $1.4 million to aid repairs.

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State coaching job for local

Originally published: Wednesday, 29th September, 2010

Local basketball coach Grahame Semmens has once again been recognised as one of the best in SA Country.

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Boredom allayed with Aussie fun

Originally published: Tuesday, 28th September, 2010

The local library is making sure no youngster is bored during the break period.

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Guides reunite, celebrate

Originally published: Tuesday, 28th September, 2010

To celebrate their centenary the local Girl Guides will be holding a reunion in conjunction with a national flag flying and promise renewal ceremony.

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Local volunteers in finals race

Originally published: Tuesday, 28th September, 2010

The city’s volunteer community has been selected as one of three finalists in the 2010 NSW/ACT Regional Achievement and Community Awards; Community of the Year category.

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Week of golf a drawcard

Originally published: Tuesday, 28th September, 2010

Golfers from across the country are here this week for the annual Silver City Classic, Veteran Golf Week.

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Police to clamp down on rowdy parties

Originally published: Monday, 27th September, 2010

A rowdy party in Crystal Street ended prematurely on Saturday night when police closed it down, but not before several assaults, between $2,000 and $3,000 damage to a hall, several cases of malicious damage and offensive behaviour.

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Memorable Mad Max

Originally published: Monday, 27th September, 2010

The Silverton Mad Max Museum opened for business at the weekend.

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Water projects near complete

Originally published: Monday, 27th September, 2010

Two major City Council projects are nearing completion. While the projects involved the control of stormwater, they both suffered some delays because of recent wet weather.

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Fun in the sun

Originally published: Monday, 27th September, 2010

The city got a long awaited taste of the warm spring weather at the weekend with an ideal start to the school holidays.

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Restricted view of Kinchega

Originally published: Monday, 27th September, 2010

Visitors and locals are encourged to join one the National Parks and Wildlife Service’s (NPWS) tours to explore Kinchega National Park during the spring school holidays.

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Bush welfare campaigner wins top NSW award

Originally published: Monday, 27th September, 2010

A champion for women and indigenous communities whose welfare service touches more than half of rural NSW has won a Telstra Business Award.

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People ‘hurting’

Originally published: Friday, 24th September, 2010

Thousands can’t pay for power

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Battered prix team rolled with punches

Originally published: Friday, 24th September, 2010

Willyama High students are still recovering after their gruelling 24-hour pedal prix race.

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Waste linked to housing program

Originally published: Friday, 24th September, 2010

Unsatisfactory workmanship, unfinished projects, unliveable conditions and wastage are rife in the far west’s NSW Government Aboriginal Housing Program, according to the Member for Murray-Darling.

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Bown back in the mix

Originally published: Friday, 24th September, 2010

After first year Norwood coach Nathan Bassett announcing Broken Hill export Stewie Bown is in contention to return for Sunday’s SANFL preliminary final clash with the Woodville-West Torrens, the affable big man has done everything in his power to give himself a chance of a recall.

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Heavy-vehicle bypass back on the agenda

Originally published: Thursday, 23rd September, 2010

Miner Perilya said it would help pay for a proposed heavy vehicle bypass which could go right passed a number of its assets.

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Rock show promises to be memorable gig

Originally published: Thursday, 23rd September, 2010

The annual Gem and Mineral Show “Rock-on” is being held tomorrow and aims to educate and entertain locals. 

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Call goes out for village people

Originally published: Thursday, 23rd September, 2010

A new community organisation is being set up in South Broken Hill and organisers are looking for members.

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Channel 9 only weeks away: Southern Cross

Originally published: Wednesday, 22nd September, 2010

Local television viewers will soon receive Channel Nine in a historic first for the region.

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Headframe ‘has to go’

Originally published: Wednesday, 22nd September, 2010

Perilya will have to submit a development application to undertake work at its Southern Operations after Council said it was not easily able to remove some parts of the mine from its new local environmental plan. 

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Service wins award

Originally published: Wednesday, 22nd September, 2010

The area mental health service won two national awards recently.

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Golden beginning

Originally published: Wednesday, 22nd September, 2010

The majority owner of the White Dam gold mine has reported a glittering start to the mine’s two and a half year life.

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Vandals keep busy

Originally published: Wednesday, 22nd September, 2010

Nejaim Steel was targeted by vandals over the weekend. Some time between 4pm Saturday and 11am Sunday, the front window of Iodide Street business wassmashed in an attempt to gain entry, police said. 

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Under the pump

Originally published: Tuesday, 21st September, 2010

Local motorists have been paying more than 20 cents extra per litre at the petrol pump compared to other cities.

University of NSW Competition and Consumer Law expert, Associate Professor Frank Zumbo said Broken Hill motorists were not getting the benefits of falling petrol prices.
Due to the strong Australian dollar, retail prices across the major capital cities and regional centres have seen their prices dramatically fall by more than 15 cents.
He said it was easy to target Broken Hill with high petrol prices because the oil companies could "get away with it".
"It's now cheaper to import refined unleaded into Australia from Singapore," Prof. Zumbo said.
He said with the cheaper price of importing, local prices should be falling.
Fuel prices in Sydney averaged out at $1.12 per litre, Newcastle and Wollongong at $1.15, and Albury at $1.20; according to the Australian Institute of Petroleum (AIP) results released on September 12.
Over the course of two months, whilst other cities prices have decreased, Broken Hill has remained unchanged at around $1.30.
Prof. Zumbo said there were two possible reason for petrol costing more in regional NSW areas such as Broken Hill.
One was that the wholesale price has been kept inflated by the oil companies, he said.
Prof Zumbo said oil companies could be creating what he calls a "cosy club," where they act independently, but shadow each other's prices for mutual benefit.
"The oil companies appear to be playing games across NSW."
He said the prices locally had not moved at all, whilst prices in other centres had decreased dramatically.
Prof Zumbo said it was also possible that local retailers were playing games.
He said petrol stations could also be following one another and keeping their prices high across the city.
Prof Zumbo said transperancy would be the first step in solving the petrol price problem in Broken Hill.
"We need to know what the wholesale price is in Broken Hill, so we can (decide) who really is playing games."
He said it would be difficult to find out wholesale prices as oil companies don't usually reveal them.
"We need an investigation into petrol prices in Broken Hill."
Results from the AIP released yesterday show Adelaide prices increased by 9.5%, and nationally prices have risen on average by 3.6 cents to $1.23, still lower than prices locally.

* Even after the most recent price hikes in metropolitan areas, the cost of petrol in Broken Hill is about 10 cents higher than capital cities and regional centres.

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Searching outback for answers

Originally published: Tuesday, 21st September, 2010

To mark the 150th anniversary of the Burke and Wills expedition a group of environmentalists is taking the same track, but unlike the pioneers they are connecting with locals along the way.

Historians believe that Burke and Wills could well have survived their ill-fated trek had they befriended the Aborigines.
Dr Jonathan King, who is leading the Burke and Wills Environmental Expedition, said yesterday that this trip was about talking to locals about local environmental issues.
"We are asking; "What are the environmental problems?" Dr King said.
He said it was important as the research conducted would help the federal government decide how to spend the $9.9 billion they have pledged for regional Australia.
The expedition from Melbourne to the Gulf of Carpentaria provides a chance to compare the landscape as Burke and Wills saw it in 1860 with today's.
It will also be used to identify ways current land managers and community members are dealing with issues such as the introduction of foreign plants and animals, changed river, soil and vegetation conditions and recognising the value of Aboriginal people's knowledge and skills in caring for the environment.
Dr King expects to cover 42,000 kilometres over the next three months. He is being joined by scientists, students and politicians.
"We are here to talk to people about environmental issues ... and tell the Federal Government how to spend it," Dr King said.
Dr King said the group had been working with indigenous people to ensure they raise important issues on the environment.
After visiting Menindee, the team spent yesterday talking to locals in the city and asking them about their stories and views on the environment.
"People might have stories of their own ... we're here to learn," Dr King said.
Operations Manager for the trip Holger Schumann said the more pressure that is put on the government, the more funding and help that will be given to regional areas.
Dr King said by reaching the locals, information was "coming straight from the horses' mouths".
For more information visit www.cv.vic.gov.au or phone 0419 495 732.


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Victory sweet for 'Pies fan

Originally published: Tuesday, 21st September, 2010

Local man Mark Mitchell cut a fine figure in his pink tutu walking into the Red Robin Deli Monday Afternoon.

Mitchell lost a bet with the Red Robin's Lisa Tonkin-Werch when Collingwood beat Geelong last weekend.
Both agreed that the wager was 'just a bit of fun' with Mitchell admitting he wasn't that confident heading into the game. "I bought the chocolate last Wednesday!" he said.
Lisa Tonkin-Werch is glad Collingwood won, otherwise she would have been wearing a Geelong jumper all day; a fate she couldn't bear.
The diehard Collingwood fan said she probably would have done something drastic.


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Molly can't stay away

Originally published: Tuesday, 21st September, 2010

A former teacher, who left the city in 2001, has returned to check up on her home of more than 80 years.

Molly Warren, 92, taught at North, Alma, Central, Morgan Street and Burke Ward over the 47 years she worked as a teacher here.
Ms Warren retired in 1973, and continued teaching casually for 13 years.
She has returned to visit every second year since and says she has a love for her home town.
"I was here two years ago, and I've been backwards and forwards about every second year since I left in 2001," Ms Warren said.
While here, she caught up with her old boss, Harold Ritch, who was the deputy principal of Alma School.
The two began working together 50 years ago, and Mr Ritch said he still remembered her when she called him recently.
"You couldn't forget her," Mr Ritch said.
"They were the golden days in the late 40's and 50's"
Molly said she loves it in Broken Hill and tells the residents at the hostel where she now lives all about her home town.
"All the water coming down the Darling River and going out to Umberumberka; and seeing the water out there, and going out to Stephens Creek. I just love it."
She also said she loved the Sturt Desert Peas which were currently blooming around the city.
"I just love being here, I'll never forget Broken Hill."
"I live in a nine story hostel, and I've been living there for the past five and a half years.
Molly is currently writing her memoirs so family members can read her stories when she is gone.
"I'm writing it down as far as I can... think back."
"There's lots of things I could write about.
"My son said to me: 'Why don't you write a book Mum?'
"I said if I wrote everything down it might almost be a book."
Ms Warren acknowledged the school yard was a very different place when she was a teacher.
"In my day there were no knives, drugs, and what-have-you.
"When children fell in the play ground and cried you could put your arms around them and commiserate with them.
"You can't do that today."
Molly leaves on the Indian Pacific train for her home in Bankstown on Friday.


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West still the benchmark

Originally published: Tuesday, 21st September, 2010

The West Panthers have capped off a year of domination in men's soccer by winning both the A grade and B grade grand finals on Sunday.

Earlier in the day, Celtic ladies were crowned the team of 2010, winning all three cups on offer in the women's competition.
The men's grand final produced a fitting finale to another year of excellent local soccer, and unlike 2009, thankfully soccer was not page one news yesterday.
Congratulations to all who attended the finals, firstly for braving the cold weather, secondly for adhering to the alcohol ban and thirdly for putting up with the damn noisy "show" hooters. Maybe they can also be banned next year!
The final was everything that was expected of two very passionate clubs hell bent on holding the cup.
West gambled (and won) by playing with only 14, allowing Matt Ali to play in the B grade final.
Adelaide referee Steve Gregan did a fantastic job allowing the game to flow, and being decisive and calm with his decisions, which added to the spectacle.
Both teams played a very defensive game plan with West having Johnny Bugeja very deep in defence, whilst St Joes midfielders Matt Muscat and Craig Stephens were also playing very defensive roles. It was no surprise that the game was nil-all at halftime, with both goalies rarely called into action.
For West defenders Terry Delbridge and Jack Attrill had leather poisoning as neither was pressured on the ball.
For St Josephs Patrick Nash had so many defensive rebound headers in the first half the Panadol was in short supply at half time.
Joeys' captain Justin Ellice also had a huge game at left back, keeping out a rampaging Joey Langdon, Bryant Mitchell and Attrill down the right.
The tempo of the game lifted in the second half with Bugeja spending more time attacking and went close with a series of shots on goal, but from outside the 18.
West continued to dominate field position with Delbridge supplying dangerous long balls from the back which resulted in several half chances from corners.
Around the 70 minute mark St Josephs striker Simon Pedretti found himself one out with West's goalie Matt Lihou, but the soccer gods, were not in the Blues' corner and the Panthers dodged a bullet!.
Despite lots of half chances for both sides Lihou and Nathan Gageler were superb in goals and had good support from there defenders.
As the full time hooter blew the game was still deadlocked and the ref was in danger of missing his plane.
He quickly took control, removing the spectators, and had the game back under way.
The first 15 minute stanza unfolded without a goal and then, as in the 2009 final, and in much the same manor, West scored what was to be the winner.
Delbridge took a free kick from the right, blasted a long ball to the edge of the 18 where West had two unmarked players and bingo, Shane Hayward pounced and clinically slotted home a brilliant goal.
Try as they might the Blues could not find a way through what has been a brilliant West defence all year and as the final siren sounded (and those hooters) West were worthy grand final winners and St Josephs have, as predicted, been beaten by a whisker!
Best players for the winners (in my opinion) were Terry Delbridge, Attrill, Bugeja and Mitchell, whilst for St Josephs Justin Ellice won the Referee's medal, Nash, Dylan Trebilcock and Gageler were outstanding and Matt Muscat had his best game of the year.
I am not sure of the West premiership record, but it is three in row for sure, with wins over Celtic in 2008 (when trailing 1-0 until late in the game) and now two wins over St Joes, both in extra time.
That they have won the last three flags, that all could have been lost, speaks highly of their skill and never say die attitude.
Only hope is that Collingwood can do the same!


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Bumper showtime

Originally published: Monday, 20th September, 2010

While the cool nights during the weekend kept some of the crowds at bay, this year's Silver City Show was yesterday adjudged a success.

Show secretary John Ralph said that gate takings were down somewhat, but otherwise all involved reported a profitable weekend.
He said sideshow alley was busy and there were several big rides this year that were well received.
The traders were happy with the result.
In fact they were so impressed that the show is next year likely to be one of the first to see rides that have yet to appear on the Australian show circuit.
The attractions were spread out further onto the Memorial Oval for the first time this year and the result of that will be reviewed prior to next year.
The animal nursery was again a huge attraction with prizes associated with the exhibits announced yesterday. First was BH High School's sheep, second were Amanda Hamilton's puppies and third were Laine King's rats.
 
* Two great traditions of the Silver City Show, fireworks and dodgem cars, were big attractions over the weekend.

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"Living Memory" exhibition

Originally published: Monday, 20th September, 2010

An exhibition of surviving photographs from the NSW Aborigines Welfare Board is currently showing at the BH Regional Art Gallery.

The exhibition has the support of Maari Ma Health Aboriginal Corporation, which has joined forces with NSW State Records to take a portable version of the In Living Memory exhibition to Menindee and Wilcannia.
The photographs will be on display here until October 17.
A mini version of the exhibition is in Menindee and in Wilcannia.
The In Living Memory exhibition first opened to the public at State Records Gallery in The Rocks in 2006.
It was so well received that it has been extended twice and a separate touring version has been travelling to 18 venues around NSW.
Maari Ma's Manager Primary Health Care and Specialist Services, Justin Files, said the exhibition was be very special.
"We are pleased to be assisting in this event and have organised a viewing together with a luncheon first for Elders in both communities.
"This will provide Elders with private reflection before the mini portable exhibition is opened to the general public.
"It will include 25 x A3 sized images from the Aborigines Welfare Board (AWB) collection, 20 albums with all 1000 photos from the AWB collection and a laptop database with digital copies of all the photos, which people can search by name, place, date or subject.
"Both communities are fortunate to have the opportunity to view a portable version of the exhibition without having to travel to Broken Hill and I would encourage as many residents in both communities to see it as the far west is the final venue of the tour," Mr Files said.

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Celebrity chef adds spice to long lunch

Originally published: Monday, 20th September, 2010

A renowned celebrity chef will be visiting the city to host a lunch to raise funds for the Outback and All that Jazz festival.

The "Jazz, Jazz and More Jazz, Long Lunch" will be hosted by celebrity chef Athol Wark, who has themed the day "Better City, Better Life".
Outback and all that Jazz, Business BH, TAFE and the Desert Knowledge Outback Business Network Program are bringing the "wild food" chef to the city.
Wark, from Alice Springs, specialises in using Australian flavours and local goods.
He is the head chef at the Australian Pavilion in Shanghai and has established an international reputation for creating dishes using wild food seasonings harvested from the Australian bush.
The lunch will be held at the Broken Hill Golf and Country Club on November 22 and tickets will cost $120, which will include wine, beer and a three-course meal.
Promoter Ann Rogers said the event was a the major fundraiser for Outback and All That Jazz and it was good to see someone of Mr Wark's calibre visiting Broken Hill.
"It is not very often we get a celebrity chef ... of this calibre," Ms Rogers said.
A visiting jazz band will be playing during the luncheon and local celebrities will be involved, as well as auctions.
"Come along for the music ... it is not very often we have the opportunity to enjoy good food, good company and to sit back in the outback," Ms Rogers said.
The event will provide an opportunity for local business people and the community to enjoy a feast featuring foods that have been presented on the world stage by the very person who created the menus.
Mr Wark will also hold a master class for students and apprentices on November 19 and for chefs and restaurateurs on November 22 at the TAFE training kitchen.  
"This is a great opportunity for our up and coming chefs and students to see what they can aspire to," Ms Rogers said.
Mr Wark has recently prepared dinner for 40 specially chosen Chinese investors who were invited to the VIP Lounge of the Australian Pavilion for a dinner, hosted by Territory Chief Minister Paul Henderson at the Shanghai Expo.
To book in or find out more information about any of the events phone 8087 2277 or email ann@legionclub.com.au.



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Garden therapy

Originally published: Friday, 17th September, 2010


Results of Silver City Garden Club Competition are as follows.
Best Display of Spring Flowers: 1st Kaye Radford, 480 Union Street; 2nd Lynn McManus, 105 Pell Lane; 3rd Shirley Rayner, 492 Lane Street.
Best Shade House: 1st Ethel Ritter, 114 Wilson Street; 2nd R.& H. Milne, 585 Wyman Street.
Best Senior Citizen Home Garden: 1st Mrs Lillian Cutting, 237 Bromide Street; 2nd R.& H. Milne, 585 Wyman Street; 3rd W. R. Pascoe, 29 Boughtman Street.
Best Garden in Senior Citizen Complexc - Maintained by Resident: 1st Marjorie Dinham, Unit 17 Shorty O'Neil Village; 2nd M. G. Britten, Unit 35 Shorty O'Neil Village.
Best Front Garden, Large Block: Kaye Radford, 480 Union Street; Smaller Block:
W.R. Pascoe, 29 Boughtman Street.
Best Back Garden, Large Block: Michael and Marjorie Raetz, 82 Crystal Street; Shirley Rayner, 492 Lane Street; Smaller Block: Lynn McManus, 105 Pell Lane; W.R. Pascoe, 29 Boughtman Street.
Best Nature Strip: 1st Channing Family, 156 Harris Street.
Best Entertainment Area: Stephen and Darlene Howarth, 2 Pell Lane.
Best Modern Low Maintenance Garden: 1st Lynn McManus, 105 Pell Lane; 2nd V. Wurn, 81 Thomas Street; 3rd Sue Lehman, 324 Thomas Street.
Best Water Feature: Commercial, Fred J. Potter's, Oxide Street; Residental, Lynn McManus, 105 Pell Lane.
Best Commercial Section: 1st Fred J. Potter's, Oxide Street; 2nd War Veterans Hostel, Thomas Street.
Best Native Garden: Beth and Peter Gurney, 240 Hall Street; Michael and Marjorie Gaetz, 82 Crystal Street.
Open Gardens: Lynn McManus, 105 Pell Lane, 11am to 1pm Saturday; Ethel Ritter, 114 Wilson Street, Saturday afternoon; W. R. Pascoe, 29 Boughtman Street, Saturday afternoon.

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Walk to mark dementia week

Originally published: Friday, 17th September, 2010

City Council is conducting a street walk on Sunday to mark National Dementia Awareness Week.

Everyone is invited to join the "Dementia Walk" to raise awareness of dementia in the community.
It starts starts at the Lions Reserve (opposite the Visitors' Information Centre) at 11am and continues to Sturt Park, where a number of support service representatives will be present to talk about dementia and available assistance.
There will also be fun activities, give-aways and a free sausage sizzle.
Organisations available for advice at the Sturt Park include: Far West Dementia Advisory Service, Far West Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre, Digital switchover Liaison Officer, YMCA, NSW Fire Service, NSW police, Centacare, Uniting Care Miraga, Homecare, Sunraysia Residential Services, Lifeline, Robinson College.
Members of the public are encouraged to come along and enjoy a barbecue cooked by Lions Club members. The Y's Men's Club will be entertaining the youngsters with the a merry-go-round and supporters can watch a line dancing display. There will also be an opportunity to sing a karaoke tune.
The Dementia Support Group will meet on Alzheimer's Awareness Day (Tuesday) at the Aged Persons Rest Centre at 10.30am and there will be an information stand at Westside Plaza on Thursday.

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Child pornography charges

Originally published: Friday, 17th September, 2010

A 49-year-old local man has been arrested after allegedly setting up and administering a number of internet sites featuring child pornography.

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It's showtime!

Originally published: Thursday, 16th September, 2010

Anticipation is building as the 121st annual Silver City Show gets ready to open this evening.
With all the signs that everything will be set up and ready to go, gates open at the Memorial Oval from 5pm.
Silver City Show Committee President Bruce McIntosh said everything was "coming up good" and all the rides were back.
Old favourites like the Kamikaze, Sky Diver, ferris wheel, dodgem cars, cha-cha and Tilt-a-whirl will be available as well as "stuff for the kids" according to Mr McIntosh.
The show will also host arts and crafts, jumping castles, the fun factory, animal nursery and show bags on the oval.
Mr McIntosh said with everything looking good for the show, his only hope was that the weather would be nice.
"There is quite a variety (of rides) ... we are hoping for a good weekend," he said.
The fireworks display will take place on Friday and Saturday night at 9pm.
Gates close at 11pm tonight. Hours are 8am until 10pm tomorrow and 8am until 10pm on Saturday. The show rides will not be operating on Sunday but there will horse events underway.

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Ley promoted

Originally published: Thursday, 16th September, 2010

Federal Member for Farrer, Sussan Ley, has been promoted as part of the Coalition's shake-up of cabinet on Tuesday.

Ms Ley has been moved from her position as Shadow Assistant Treasurer, to both Shadow Minister for Employment Services and Shadow Minister for Childcare and Early Childhood Learning.
Speaking about her appointments yesterday, Ms Ley said she was thrilled to have been given responsibility for two critical areas.
"There is nothing more important than getting every child the right start in life," Ms Ley said.
"We need policies that support families with their childcare choices and give children the best possible chances as they begin a lifetime of learning."
She said early intervention for children with special needs and children at risk was an area she was particularly interested in, and explained that access to good quality childcare and pre-school was vital.
"The earlier problems such as Autism Spectrum disorder can be picked up, the faster families can be linked with the services they need."
In the area of employment participation, Ms Ley quoted former UK PM Tony Blair's statement that fairness in life starts with a job, emphasising the need for effective policies that support disadvantaged job seekers back into the workforce.
"The Coalition Green army, to complement the Landcare efforts of farmers is an excellent example of an employment participation initiative that works both for the community and for the individual," she said.
She also said she would take stock of the state of regional and rural Australia as she approached her new role.
Ms Ley noted childcare in some rural areas was far from adequate, and there was scope to provide more opportunity for meaningful employment for people missing out.
"I look forward to holding the Government to account in these important policy areas and welcome the new opportunities for debate that the new Parliament will bring."
Parliament resumes for its first sitting on September 28.


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Flood relief

Originally published: Thursday, 16th September, 2010

The South Rotary Club is lending a hand to the victims of the Pakistan floods by donating much needed supplies.

The local club has donated a shelter box, which contains a ten-man tent, cooking utensils, a water purifier and colouring books - worth $1000.
The club has donated half the cost of the aid kit, with the other half funded by president-elect Margaret Lesjak.
Ms Lesjak has strong ties to Pakistan and said she felt the boxes would help out some displaced people.
Ms Lesjak travelled to Pakistan and worked as a volunteer for two years doing laboratory testing in a hospital.
"It was a place I came to know," she said.
She said as the country works to re-build houses, businesses, electricity and water supplies; every little bit counts.
"You have to start somewhere," she said.
Ms Lesjak said with the lack of supplies available, necessities such as bread and water will increase in price.
"That will make it much harder for everybody."
The recent floods have caused about 14.5 million people to be displaced from their homes.
Rotary international has instigated a relief effort to provide as many shelter boxes as possible to the stricken area.
As a result Rotary Australia has been asking for donations to fund the cost of shelter boxes.
Donations for shelter boxes can be sent in cheque form to Shelter Box Australia, Po Box 2076, Wahroonga NSW.

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Double celebrations

Originally published: Thursday, 16th September, 2010

Double celebrations

There were celebrations one after the other at the BH Golf and Country Club recently after two members scored holes-in-one.

Paul Gepp was playing in a group of four when he reached the 8th hole and lined up his shot with a driver.
Paul said there was a bit of a breeze on the 175 metre stretch, and quite a lead-up to the momentous occasion.
He said he drove the ball and it first went into a creek, onto the green and then finally into the hole.
It was Paul's second hole in one. The last one was four years ago today, on the 16th hole.
Paul Torney scored a hole in one during the Will Kuerschner Memorial Golf Day at the weekend.
"I never buy expensive golf balls, but I bought a $9 golf ball on Sunday," he said.
Paul put the ball away and then brought it back out on the 16th hole.
Using a 9 iron, Paul put the $9 ball in the hole.
"It has only taken 30 years," Paul said.


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Trader defiant

Originally published: Wednesday, 15th September, 2010

The owners of a take-away food shop say they will continue to trade outside their permitted hours on weekends despite being slapped with a $3,000 fine.

The business, Late Night Kebab, received the fine from City Council this week after staying open beyond the hours set out in its development consent.
Council canvassed nearby residents and police before deciding to restrict the shop's hours to 1am on Friday and Saturday as part of a six month trial period.
But since opening eight weeks ago, the Oxide Street business has been operating until 4am on the weekends - and advertising the hours - in flagrant breach of the conditions.
Part-owner Sheldon Marsh yesterday defended the decision, saying that the period after 2am on weekends was the "busiest time of the night" for the business.
He also said that since opening the shop hadn't experienced any of the problems that were raised by Council or the police.
"We've had no fights, no complaints," Mr Marsh said.
A report to Council recommended against the 4am closing time because, it said, the shop was in a residential area and consideration needed to be given to "noise and anti-social behavioural issues".
Police also were not in favour of the hours, telling the council that areas with late night trading food outlets experienced a "significant increase" in alcohol-related crime.
One neighbour also raised concern about the effect the shop's presence would have on residents if it opened past midnight.
But Mr Marsh said the business had hired two security guards to work from 11pm to 4am on Friday, and from midnight to 4am on Saturday.
Other conditions imposed by Council included the installation of security cameras and that no tables or seating be provided for customers.
Mr Marsh said it could even be argued that the shop was completing a service for the community by providing food to intoxicated customers.
He also questioned the timing of the fine, which arrived after police paid the shop a visit last Friday night, and again the next evening, to ask why it was operating outside its permitted hours.
"If Council were so concerned about it we would have got a fine the first time we opened late.
"We plan to take it court. I think Late Night Kebab is doing Broken Hill a service."
Mr Marsh said police were only against the 4am closing because they did not want the "extra duties" of patrolling the area at night and moving people on.
"That's the only reason they (expressed) concern in the first place.
But local Crime Manager, Inspector Mick Stoltenberg, said that recent history showed that smaller centres suffered when shops extended their operating hours.
He said people, particularly those affected by alcohol, tended to "gravitate" to those shops when there was nowhere else to go, and that's when trouble started.
He cited the example of the Shell Memorial Service Station, which used to operate for 24 hours before residents and police complained about the behaviour of the large number of youth who regularly congregated at the service station.
Insp Stoltenberg said that while police were not against anyone trying to start a new business, the wider community needed to be put first.
"Prevention is better than cure," he said.
"It would be neglectful if we did not pay an area which had the potential for being a hotspot any attention."
He pointed out that it was also Council that had imposed the operating hours, not the police.
Council's group manager sustainability, Peter Oldsen, said that before the fine was issued there had been "numerous discussions" and correspondence with the owners regarding their non-compliance with the conditions.
He also said the shop's operating hours were not the only issue concerning Council.
"There are other breaches involved," he said.
The shop is on a six month trial period, with final approval dependent upon a review of the operation including its compliance of all conditions.
Mr Oldsen said Council intended to consider the consent at its next ordinary meeting during a closed session.


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Safari no game park

Originally published: Wednesday, 15th September, 2010

Local rally driving enthusiast Kerry Turley and a team of mechanics and navigators will be competing in the Australian Safari in Western Australia this week.

Turley, who is competing in the safari for the third time, equated the Australian Safari to the most gruelling off-road race in the world, the Paris-Dakar.
"It's basically the same as the Paris-Dakar. It's like the Dakar Down Under," he said.
While the Paris-Dakar traditionally ran from Paris (France) to Dakar (Senegal) the routes have varied in recent years.
This year Team Turley is sending a 6-person contingent for the Australian Safari; Kerry Turley will be the driver of the GQ Nissan Patrol entry and Deborah Turley is a member of the service crew and chef.
Jonathan Oliver is the head mechanic, who according to Mr Turley "fixes all the things we break from Broken Hill".
Jodie Kent is also a service crew member and nurse, while Adelaide's Naomi Tillett will be the navigator. Russell Jones, also from Adelaide, is a mechanic and truck driver.
"Naomi last year won the Targa Tasmania and Targa New Zealand outright ... hopefully this year we can get up there with the top bunch in the Safari," Turley said.
The safari is an eight-day race covering about 4000 kilometres.
"We race against other 4-wheel drives, motorbikes and 4-wheel quad bikes.
"Entrants come from USA, Japan, China, New Zealand, Brazil and South Africa," he said.
"Since last year's event we have rebuilt our current 2003 Safari-winning car and fitted a new Holden six litre V8 engine and a lot of other goodies.
"Jonathan from Silver City 4WD has done a great job and all our testing in the car has been very encouraging."
There is a lot of hype around this year's event with V8 super car driver Craig Lowndes driving a Holden V8 Colorado.
Craig Lowndes' car stopped in the city over the weekend on its way to Mildura for last minute testing before heading across the Nullarbor this weekend.
"Craig's navigator for this year's event is Kees Weel, owner of the Holden off road team," Kerry said.
"Kees is the original owner of my car so he helps out a lot with information and parts," said Turley.
Last year's safari was not without complications, according to Turley.
"Last year we qualified fourth in the prologue and came across five-time Australian Safari winner and Dakar star Bruce Garland stopped in the middle of the track.
"We hit him from behind in dust doing about 80 kilometres per hour and did a fair bit of damage to the car," he said.
"We soldiered on and finished the event in tenth outright," he said.
"For all the latest news and results on the team go to www.australasiansafari.com.au or go to our Facebook site and join up. Type in Team Turley.

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Off-leash off agenda

Originally published: Wednesday, 15th September, 2010

Council is not planning to invest in a dog off-leash area for the city this year, even though they are obliged by law to provide one.

While Council's animal control manager Geoff Laan acknowledges that off-leash areas were "certainly part of this day and age" he said there were no plans to open one.
An inadequately fenced and prickle infested area behind the North Family Play Centre in Murton Street was once ear-marked for a dog off-leash area, but it is currently in the process of being turned into a stormwater retention dam.
Mr Laan said an off-leash area was more suited to a big city environment, where dog owners don't have wide open spaces to walk their animals.
"In the country areas, Broken Hill in particular, there are a number of open spaces"
He said if the council was to go ahead with the plan, certain aspects such as escape proof fencing would need to be built.
Mr Laan said the area would have to be governed by Council, to protect owners and their pets from dog fights.
Shade areas for dogs and people, dog waste bag dispensers and bins would also need to be installed at the site.
He said finding a place for the park in an area where it would get adequate use could be difficult.
Group Manager of Infrastructure, Paul DeLisio, said council had suggested Queen Elizabeth Park and Patton Park become off-leash areas, but he confirmed that work hadn't been budgeted for this year.
A letter to the BDT recently highlighted the frustration locals and visitors are feeling because of the lack of an off-leash area.
A woman, who wished to remain anonymous, said she often visited her family in the city with her two Labradors and had phoned council several times over 12 months and asked which parks were off-leash areas.
Over the period of a year, she was told Council was "discussing" which parks to make leash-free.
On a recent trip to the city the woman said she was told by Council that A. J. Keast Park was an off-leash area, and she took her family and dogs there for the day, only to be told by a member of a local dog obedience club that the area wasn't off-leash.
"When I phoned Council back, after much discussion, I was told that they had made a mistake and that the A. J. Keast Park was not a leash free park, but that I could take my dogs to Penrose Park and exercise them off the lead there," she said.
"It's unfair to have to drive over 20km to Penrose Park to give my dogs a walk off their lead."
The woman said she had considered moving back to the city, but wouldn't because there was no place to exercise her dogs.
The secretary of the Ladies Kennel and Obedience Dog Club, Marion Kemp, said she thought the idea was one worth looking into.
"I think there's so many rules and regulations, the things you can do, the things you can't do; dogs need an area they can run around in," Ms Kemp said.
"(It's) somewhere dogs can go."
Ms Kemp said some dogs mix well and others don't, and it came down to common sense when owners and dogs used it.
Head trainer and president of the BH All Breeds Obedience Dog Club, Darryn Poldrugo, said the park sounded like a good idea.
Mr Poldrugo has more than 12 years experience in dog training, and said behaviour of dogs, a concern amongst some residents, was hard to predict.
"Some people have got their dogs under control and some have not."


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Local star tells kids dreams can come true

Originally published: Wednesday, 15th September, 2010

It's a long way from BH High School's tramway oval to the MCG, but former local Brent Staker has proved it is possible with hard work and the determination to "follow your dreams".

The Australian Football League star was visiting his old high school yesterday to have a talk with students and to help them develop a positive attitude toward hard work.
Brent, the son of West Football Club legend Allen Staker, joined the Brisbane Lions this year after six years with the West Coast Eagles.
He played eight senior games at the local West Football Club before playing in the NSW/ACT Rams in the TAC Cup, at the age of 16. And before that he spent some time kicking a footy with his mates on the school oval.
Brent debuted for the Eagles in 2003 at the age of 19 and at the end of the 2009 football season was traded to the Brisbane Lions.
Brent yesterday told the students that during his time in the AFL he had learnt that believing in yourself and chasing your dreams were important things to remember.
He also spoke about the hard work that went into getting to the AFL and said that being dedicated goes a long way to realising dreams.
"Extra hard work goes a long way ... hard work will pay off in the future," Brent said.
Brent said he hoped the students took his advice and used it to their advantage.
BH High librarian Ros O'Connor organised the visit after finding out he was in town for an engagement and birthday party.
"Ros mentioned to my mum that they (the high school) would love to have me there," Brent said.
"It is great to be back at Broken Hill High School and to see some familiar teachers," he said.
Brent said being at BHHS was a terrific part of his life and he wished all the students the best.

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Big dry ends

Originally published: Tuesday, 14th September, 2010

With the turn of a wheel, water began flowing out of Packer's Crossing regulator yesterday morning bound for the Great Darling River Anabranch.

 By the time the gate is closed again in about two months, 47 gigalitres would have been released from Lake Cawndilla into the 460km-long anabranch.
 It will be enough to see the anabranch flow into the Murray River for the first time in eight years.
 That has people like anabranch landholder Keith Forster and Howard Jones, chairman of the NSW Murray Wetland Working Group, smiling.
 Mr Forster said yesterday the flow would breathe life back into anabranch, which last received a flow from Cawndilla in September 17, 2002.
 Another flow earlier this year - the result of a flooding Darling River - reached about half way down the anabranch.
 Mr Forster said the 41 landholders on the anabranch, who now rely on a pipeline for their domestic and stock supply, weren't allowed to access any of the current flow.
 "It's truly to rejuvenate and give the anabranch a drink," said Mr Forster, who was among a number of people to attend yesterday's gate opening at 11am.
 "There's no downside to it."
 The Murray Darling Basin Authority, which sanctioned the flow, said last week that it would provide a boost for breeding fish, birds and frogs, and regenerate vegetation.
 State Water employee Barry Philp, who was also at yesterday's opening, said releases would start at 300 megalitres per day gradually rising to 1,000ML per day.
 But while water is being drained from the bottom of the lakes, it is entering the top of the system even faster.
 Mr Philp said 9,000Ml was entering the lakes each day as a result of inflows further upstream. As of yesterday, the total storage level of the scheme was 95 per cent, with Cawndilla sitting on 89 per cent capacity.
 Yesterday was the first time the new Packer's Crossing regulator released a flow since its construction, which was done as part of the pipeline project.
 Mr Philp said that on its way to the Murray the flow would have to contend with dense vegetation in both Redbank Creek (which flows into the anabranch) and the anabranch itself.
 While it virtually guarantees water for the anabranch property owners, not every landholder was in favour of the pipeline, which was completed in 2007 at a cost of $28 million.
 Mr Forster, who supported the project and was heavily involved in its planning, said it had proved to be the right choice for landholders.
 "I don't think there's anyone who's not happy with it."
 Mr Jones, who is also chairman of the NSW Environmental Flows Committee, said the NSW and SA governments had to reach approval before the flow could happen, which they did after a case was put forward.
 "South Australia were really good (and) NSW were also good, and the (Murray Darling Basin Authority) helped facilitate it," Mr Jones said.
 Mr Jones said the flow proved "if you prepare a case and the conditions are right you'll get an outcome".
 "I'm pretty happy about today and we proved we could do it."

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City's inspiration endless: artist

Originally published: Tuesday, 14th September, 2010

After 15 years of travelling to the city, artist Sandra Kranz has still got plenty of local subject matter to paint.

Sandra, a portrait artist from Dunkeld in Victoria, loves this time of year in the city.
She normally stays for four days and paints around the Silverton and city areas.
"I never run out of subject matter ... even if I live to be 100 I'll never run out of subject matter here (in Broken Hill)," she said.
Mrs Kranz's paints plein air, or "as it happens" outdoors rather than taking a photo and painting in a studio.
She said it is a rare type of painter who doesn't use a photo.
"I paint direct on sight," she said.
This year Mrs Krantz chose the Mundi Mundi Plains as her subject.
She was surprised when she found out that the new Australian film Fury Road would be filmed there, and how green the landscape was. But she took it in her stride.
"I didn't know Mad Max was being filmed there ... on Monday, I went and had a look and I just couldn't believe how green it was," she said.
She began painting on Wednesday and it took her about an hour to finish the painting.
"I set up at 4pm ... the sky was very dramatic ... I thought I was recording history with the film crew, wild flowers, the contrast of green and red, the horizon and the spectacular sky," she said.
She said the painting came up "beautifully" but to paint it was a quick job.
"You have to be fairly quick ...you have a window of no more than an hour and a half," Mrs Kranz said.
The painting hasn't been retouched either, Mrs Kranz said "what's done is done".
"My old art teacher used to say it (painting) is only as good as your worst mistake," she said.
Mrs Kranz has spent 30 years painting and owns a gallery called Kranz Art Studio. she is also an art teacher and sells her work online.
But she paints because she loves it.
"My goal in life is to pass down what was passed onto me," Mrs Kranz said.
She is planning to paint the local streetscape next year.
"There are gorgeous buildings here ... I did want to do it last year but Broken Hill had those terrible dust storms," she said.
"There were storms the year before that so I just stuck around the Silverton area."
Mrs Kranz also took time to paint the camels at Silverton. She found them really interesting.
To see Sandra's art work visit kranzartstudio.com.



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Strike out stroke

Originally published: Tuesday, 14th September, 2010

A stroke can affect anyone at any age, and several BH Stroke Support Group members hope to shed light on Australia's leading cause of disability.

This week is the National Stroke Foundation's Stroke Awareness Week, and BH Stroke Support Group president Carol Kelland hopes to raise awareness for the cause.
Group member Bev Starkey has witnessed the devastating effects of a stroke first hand, suffering TIA's (transient ischemic attacks) before her major stroke at age 58, 16 years ago.
A TIA is known as a mini-stroke, which can last up to 24 hours before disappearing, and can be followed by a major stroke.
"There's no such thing as a little stroke, they are warnings of a major stroke," Mrs Starkey said.
"No stroke is the same, it affects people in different ways.
"If I had know they were the warning signs, I would have had tests and it wouldn't have happened."
Mrs Starkey plays indoor bowls to keep herself active and says while people may not be able to see physical signs of her stroke, she still had a slight problem with balance.
"There is life after a stroke," she said.
Both Mrs Kelland and group member Josie Hill care for their husbands who have both suffered strokes, and say knowing the symptoms is important.
Symptoms of stroke are numbness, trouble with speech, dizziness and difficulty swallowing.
The ladies will be at the Plaza on Wednesday from 9am selling badges to raise money for local stroke support services.
Ms Hill said the badges represent the brain waves which appear during a stroke.
They also welcomed anyone who was living with someone affected by a stroke to their meetings at 10.30am at the BH Community Inc on the last Friday of every month.


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Donation bin destroyed

Originally published: Tuesday, 14th September, 2010

A clothing donation bin at Cento Westside has been destroyed after police said a car reversed into the metal box.
The St Vincent de Paul Centre clothing bin was reduced to scrap metal as a result of the hit which happened sometime over the weekend.
The centre said donations could be dropped into the Vinnies Centre at 97-99 Argent Street or another clothing bin located at IGA Fresh in Williams Street.
People can also have clothing collected by the centre by phoning 8087 5813.


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Blues into grand finals

Originally published: Tuesday, 14th September, 2010

St Josephs have advanced to the grand finals in both the women's and men's A grade after dominant performances on Sunday.

In the women's semi-final West were dealt a huge blow when key defender Stacey Carter-Ray was forced out through illness. Her loss cannot be underestimated as she plays the pivotal role at sweeper, with her skill and leg speed able to save the day on many occasions.
St Josephs were able to exploit this with Isabella Morris and Cassie Robinson able to mount many dangerous attacks from out wide which resulted in goals to both ladies.
Add goals to "player of the match" Sarah Magill and the excited Stacey Thompson and the Blues were clear winners, leading 4-0 until two late handball penalties saw Stephanie Balman score twice.
West would be disappointed with their effort as they had finished the second half of the year strongly and were favoured to win.
Xanthe Zanon played a strong game when moved into defence, whilst Jasmine Mitchell and Logan Cooper always provide a genuine contest for the full 90 minutes.
The Blues advance to the final against Celtic and will be encouraged by the performance of their back four defenders in Stevie Robinson, Ellie Nilsen, captain Georgia Picton and Serena Prout, who all played excellent games to prevent any goals from being scored.
In the men's A grade semi-final St Josephs and Alma played a tense first half with both sides very compact in defence.
For St Josephs Patrick Nash at centre back and Dylan Trebilcock at sweeper were key players with Lukas Muscat and Justin Ellice also very tight out wide.
For Alma the Hebbard boys, Will and Laurence, were just as dominant, keeping the Blues out.
The highlight of the first half was the continual breaks down the left by Bryce Bessell, who supplied several excellent crosses towards Jimmy Wilkins and Jyh Stubing.
Alma came very close to scoring when Daniel McInerney let rip with a long range rocket that was swerving into the top left corner, but for the brilliance of Nathan Gageler who just managed to tip it over the crossbar.
St Josephs scored within five minutes of the resumption when 15-year-old pocket rocket Rylie McInnes danced through the Alma defence to score a brilliant goal.
McInnes has all the tricks and is super competitive for a lad so young and slight in stature.
Within 15 minutes St Josephs had doubled their lead when key midfielder Alex Pearce supplied a brilliant ball for Aaron Kubiak to slam home from close range.
Alma continued to search for a way back into the game but St Josephs had saved probably their best team performance for the year and will enter next week's final with some degree of confidence, albeit West seem clear favourites.
In the B grade final an epic contest was played out with Alma ultimately advancing to the grand final against West, winning on penalties over St Josephs after the teams were deadlocked at 1-1 at full time and after extra time.
Jorge Oviedo for Alma scored a sensational long range goal on 60 minutes after intercepting an errant pass, whilst Adrian McDonald converted an 89th minute penalty to throw St Josephs a lifeline.
In the end the Alma goalie pulled off two great saves and a further St Josephs shot hit the wood work to hand Alma deserved victory and a place in the final.
In the junior age divisions St Josephs and Celtic will contest the Under 12's, West and Celtic the Under 14's, and West and St Josephs the Under 17's this Friday night after all teams won their qualifying finals.


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Premiere of new movie

Originally published: Monday, 13th September, 2010

The city was the launch pad for the new Australian film, Broken Hill, on Saturday night.
The premiere was screened at the Silver City Cinema after a cocktail party at the BH Regional Art Gallery attended by 130 people.
The functions were attended by a star of the movie, Luke Arnold, plus local dignitaries and representatives of the filmmakers.
The film had its Australia-wide release yesterday.

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Artist's work prized

Originally published: Monday, 13th September, 2010

Luck seems to be on Deirdre Edwards' side lately, after she took out first prize at an inter-state art exhibition and saw her book about the lives of ordinary regional women ride a new wave of success.

The popular local artist, who now spends her time between Broken Hill and Moonta Bay, took out first prize at the Port Pirie Art Prize recently for her piece "Bundaleer Leaf Litter".
The etching takes walking through a forest to another level, illustrating the leaf litter which builds up in the forest, rather than focusing on obvious aspects of the forest such as trees, the sky and the wildlife.
Mrs Edwards said the work was taken right off her workshop wall, and she gave no thought to the prize that she could win.
"It was last minute, I just plucked it off the wall and decided to put it in," she said.
The artist won the Open Prize worth $2500, which is awarded to the artist that best reflects the connection and relevance of the Southern Flinders Ranges and Port Pirie.
"It topped off my year when I won."
The award is her 20th to date since first winning an award for her work 17 years ago.
In conjunction with her award, several major NSW girls' private schools have picked up her new book "Paparazzi in Print" for their school libraries.
Mrs Edwards said the book reflects the "significant contribution" women have made to Broken Hill and the surrounding areas.
The women who were researched in the book were "everyday" women, who had no job and no standing in society.
Mrs Edwards said the book had already been sold out and is currently in its second edition.
"It wasn't meant to be this substantial."
Already the book has been picked up by collectors, libraries and overseas buyers, as well as the city's local library.
Mrs Edwards has donated two copies of the book - one for archives and one for readers - to the Charles Rasp Memorial Library.
Librarian Marvis Schofield said the books were much appreciated.
"Most of our archives are about men and mining, so it's very good to have history about the efforts of women," Ms Schofield said.
Historian Brian Tonkin, who was presented with the book on Friday, also spoke highly of it because it highlighted women in the community.
The local historian said he liked how the book concentrated on the biographies of the regional women.
"It looks at what women have been doing."
Mrs Edwards also donated a copy of her "Parallel 1930 - Broken Hill Women in the 1930's" which was launched in March this year as part of the exhibition of the same name.
The exhibition is open until October 4 at the Port Pirie Regional Art Gallery.


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Magpies never in doubt

Originally published: Monday, 13th September, 2010

The Magpies have claimed the 2010 premiership with a comfortable 64 point victory over a disappointing South side on Saturday.

Central blew the grand final apart with an opening term of superior football that was followed by an excellent second term to have the Magpies 66 points up at the long break, and the grand final in their grasp.
Central won the toss and elected to kick to the city end with a slight breeze going across the ground.
The Magpies were quickly into stride with Wilmore, Heath and Cox getting early touches.
They opened the scoring with Cox kicking a beauty. The Magpies were relentless in the opening stanza and the pressure that was applied soon told on the Roos as Carapellotti with pace kicked the second and the lead was 14 points.
The Magpies were now very confident and another goal to Cox had every Magpie up and about and the confidence was rising.
The Roos just couldn't get their hands on the footy, let alone go forward, and when Gepp snapped truly the margin was out to 26 points and the Roos needed a lift.
Derham, who started in defence, was shifted to attack and it had an immediate impact. He kicked the Roos' first, but that luxury was short lived as Perkins scored two quick goals to extend the lead to 32 points.
As the term drew to a close Perkins had one more opportunity and he capitalised, kicking his third for the quarter and giving his side a handy 39 point lead at the first change.
If this was to stay a contest the Roos needed to lift in the second term and get the scoreboard ticking over.
Unfortunately for the Roos it was the Pies who again came out the aggressor.
An early goal to Carapellotti and again the Roos were left flat-footed as the Magpies just ran the footy from all parts of the ground.
They continued to cause pain when Perkins kicked his fourth and the lead was now 50 points.
Carapellotti, who hasn't been seen for many weeks was making his presence felt when he ran onto a loose ball and kicked his third, and the lead had blown out to 56 points.
The Roos finally kicked their first for the term when Staker, who was in everything, kicked truly.
Even his efforts didn't stop the bleeding as the Magpies had all the answers.
Another two goals to Perkins and a single to Paull and the lead was out to 65 points, and this grand final was all but over.
The Magpies would go into the half time break with a 66 point lead and one hand firmly on the T.C. Gunn Cup.
Stunned patrons could only hope that the Roos would mount a comeback in the third term.
Hopes soon faded as Paull kicked the Magpies' first for the term and in doing so extended the lead to 74 points.
If you can be a little technical of the Magpies performance in the second half, they did switch players around, which seemed pointless as nothing was broken.
The Magpies were already looking to the final siren and not really playing the game out.
They had the Roos on the ropes and to a certain extent they let them off.
To the Roos' credit they did fight hard in the third term.
Westley goaled to reduce the lead to 65 before Perkins kicked his seventh.
The Roos managed to kick two in a row through Marcus O'Brien and Staker to bring the margin to 60 points, but it was a case of too little too late.
The Roos did outscore the Magpies by 6 points to trail by 59 at the last change.
The city's best junior winner, Cody Schorn gave the Roos the perfect start to the final term with first goal inside the opening minute.
But as it was all day, the Magpies had the answers and when Perkins marked strongly and goaled it was just a matter of time.
Power, playing in his first league grand final kicked a great running goal and the margin was 64 points.
The Roos continued to press forward and after a series of behinds they managed two quick goals through Staker and Cohen Caldwell, but the day belonged to the Magpies and goals to Gepp, Keenan and a captain's goal from Heath and the fat sheila was in the building.
At the final siren it was the Magpies who were 65 points up and the 2010 premiers.
It was a fantastic season by the Magpies, who only lost two games, and they deserved to by crowned champions.
Central's winning margin of 64 points was the biggest winning margin in a grand final since the Magpies achieved the identical feat back in 1995.
After half time the Roos kicked 6.14 to the Magpies 7.7 - the damage done in the opening half.
In keeping with tradition you would imagine the celebrations will be long and hard, so keep an eye out for low flying Magpies for the next few days.
Well done Centrals - the Premiers for 2010.

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Police unite to curb drunks and thuggery

Originally published: Friday, 10th September, 2010

Local police will take part in an Australasia crackdown on drunken violence this weekend.

They will join with police from cities and towns in every Australian state and territory, and across New Zealand, for Operation Unite.
The operation targets alcohol misuse, violence and anti-social behaviour, as well as unsafe road usage.
Local police Sergeant Greg McMahon said police were not wowsers but wanted people to enjoy a social occasion sensibly.
"Have a good time but do it responsibly. That's always the message, not just this weekend."
The operation begins at 6pm today with police patrolling licensed venues, conducting random breath tests, drink driving and seat belt offences, and will wind up on Sunday morning.
NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said alcohol was a factor in more than 70 per cent of street-related crime incidents that NSW police respond to.
Sergeant McMahon said when people drank too much, too often it ended badly.
"Accidents in a car or a drunken brawl where people can get assaulted ... and it often continues when they get home with domestic related violence."
He gave these simple warnings.
"Drink responsibly, don't drink and drive, drink lower alcohol drinks or mix them with soft drinks or water, take a designated driver or organise a taxi."


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Anabrach to flow

Originally published: Friday, 10th September, 2010

In the coming weeks 47,000 megalitres of water will be released for the environment of the Great Anabranch of the Darling River, downstream of the Menindee Lakes.

Water will be released from Lake Cawndilla commencing Monday and will be progressively increased to about 1,000 megalitres per day.
NSW Commissioner for Water David Harriss said yesterday that at the same time, releases would be made from Packers Crossing into Redbank Creek that will flow to the Great Anabranch.
He said that the agreement to release flows into the anabranch was a decision of the joint governments under the Murray-Darling Basin Agreement, and followed representations by the Murray-Darling Wetlands Group.
The volumes being released are from The Living Murray, Commonwealth and NSW Government environmental water entitlements.
"There has been no significant flow in the Great Anabranch since September 2002. Since then there has been a lot of vegetation growth that may affect the flow of water through the channel."
Mr Harriss said that the NSW Office of Water would work with State Water and the
Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water in managing the release pattern.
The Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water will monitor the environmental benefits of flows as part of a ten year monitoring program associated with the completion of the Darling Anabranch Stock and Domestic Pipeline in 2009.
Mr Harriss said that high flows in the Darling River during January and February this year had resulted in small flows passing into the Great Anabranch through its natural off-take from the Darling River.
"This has wet up the main channel for about half of its length and it is the perfect opportunity to divert environmental water allocations to build on the initial environmental benefits already achieved," Mr Harriss said.

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Shed some light

Originally published: Friday, 10th September, 2010

On average six people take their own life every day in Australia and Lifeline hopes to shed some light on the problem.

Today is World Suicide Prevention Day, and Lifeline BH is hoping the event will be a catalyst for action on suicide.
The event is organised through the World Health Organisation.
Local Lifeline manager Richard Lines said each day almost 170 people attempt suicide across the country.
"I want everyone to realise that as a community, we all have a role to play in helping to stop these mostly preventable deaths," Mr Lines said.
"We believe that people may see suicide as someone else's problem, something for governments or the not-for-profit sector to deal with, but it's not."
Lifeline answers almost 20,000 calls relating to suicide each year on its 13 11 14 hotline.
"We want people to realise that each and every one of us has the capacity to become 'accidental counsellors', to learn how to recognise the signs that someone might be thinking about suicide and do something about it."
Mr Lines said everyone in the community had the ability to undertake training and up-skill themselves to become part of the bigger picture.
"The solution is in all our hands," he said.
"We have a role to play in building suicide safe communities. Too many Australians are dying from suicide in this country, 2200 a year, that's 40 per cent more than motor vehicle accidents."
Lifeline recently welcomed Prime Minister Julia Gillard's commitment to $276.9 million worth of funding over four years to tackle suicide and mental health.


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Girls ready for State knock-out

Originally published: Friday, 10th September, 2010

Morgan Street Primary have become the first school from Broken Hill to enter the finals of the NSW basketball knock-out competition.

Schools from across the State are involved in the PSSA competition.
Barrier coach Sharon DeGoumois said she was reasonably confident the years 5 and 6 girls could survive the first round.
"It's very different because we have never seen these teams before," Ms DeGoumois said.
The state knock-out competition is held in Bathurst.
Ms DeGoumois said volunteer parents would drive four cars to get the eight team members to the event, which helps them experience a new level of competition.
Yesterday students and staff were taking part in several fundraising activities to help pay for the trip.
Students wore casual clothes to school, had a sausage sizzle lunch and participated in activities to raise money for the event.
The first game Morgan Street will play will be against a primary school from the NSW South Coast.
The competitions will take place on Monday at Bathurst Basketball Stadium, with the Barrier team playing at 9.30am.

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Growth predicted

Originally published: Thursday, 9th September, 2010

The retail and mining sectors are expected to support local jobs growth in the future.

In its 2009-10 Far West Economic Update Report, Regional Development Australia (RDA) predicts about 660 jobs will be created in the city over the next decade.
The development of Leasecorp's new shopping centre and new and ongoing mining projects would be key to jobs growth, the report said.
RDA Far West chairman Kym Fuller said the report showed a positive future for the region.
"Based on the medium scenario, the report predicts 40 per cent of employment growth, or 257 jobs, will be created in the retail sector while 25 per cent of new jobs will be within the mining industry, equating to approximately 173 new positions across the next 10 years," Mr Fuller said.
"There will also be increased employment of about 51 jobs in finance, business and communications services and approximately 50 new employment opportunities for construction."
The jobs forecast for the city were modelled using local projects including -Bemax's Snapper mine, the Rasp Mine, the Honeymoon uranium mine and Council's  aquatic centre expansion and development of the new film studio.
Mr Fuller said armed with this information the city could prepare for the future.
"This report provides a valuable insight into what skills will be required in the Far West region across the next ten years and allow businesses and individuals to consider training and employment in sectors where certain skills are going to be required."
The city's mayor, Wincen Cuy, said the updated report highlighted the positive economic impact created by several large scale projects taking place in the region.
"Mining and exploration across the Far West still plays an important role in the resilience of Broken Hill and the region, together with infrastructure projects being led by Broken Hill City Council," he said.
"Existing operations and proposed projects in mining and exploration show the resource industry has commenced some steps towards recovery following the Global Financial Crisis."
The updated report can be accessed at Council's website or at www.rdafarwestnsw.org.au.


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Tree vandalism a sad day for city: Mayor

Originally published: Thursday, 9th September, 2010

More than 30 trees have been destroyed on the footpath outside Jubilee Oval.

The saplings, planted as part of City Council's Street beautification program and the upgrading of the Jubilee Oval, were cut just above the base.
Mayor Wincen Cuy said yesterday the vandalism had been reported to the police and investigations were continuing.
"This is an extremely sad act of vandalism," Mayor Cuy said.
"It is not a good day for our community when one or two people think they can destroy community assets and not be prosecuted.
"At the end of the day, destroying a community asset means that the cost is borne by the community. It also causes distress to the Council team who invest their time and knowledge in activities that have the potential to beatify our city."
Mayor Cuy encouraged anyone who knows anything about the incident or any other act of vandalism that takes place in the city to let Council know.
Council provides a reward of up to $300 to any individual who provides information leading to the apprehension and successful prosecution of any person for the act of 'vandalism'.
A Council spokesperson said the trees were not snapped off.
"It appears that the trees were cut or sawn off," she said.
Council will be ordering new stocks and replanting trees in coming months.

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Pottery: get in before it goes

Originally published: Thursday, 9th September, 2010

The Potter's Society opened its bi-annual pottery exhibition on Friday night with more than 60 guests attending the event.

Stoneware, earthenware, sculptures and primitive fired pottery are just some of the different styles of work for sale at the town hall facade until Friday.
Exhibition committee member Vicki Sladden said a lot of works had been sold on opening night and certain items were "walking out the door".
"We've sold heaps, and there was a lot that just disappeared," Mrs Sladden said.
Artist Amanda Twomey's animal heads were the biggest hits of the exhibit.
Mrs Sladden said the event was very hit and miss with different styles selling better in different years.
"This year it seems to be a bit of everything more or less."
She said a lot of "functional wear" pottery had been popular amongst buyers.
The exhibition also exhibits students' works created from the Tuesday classes.
The exhibition is open from 10 until 4pm today and tomorrow.

* Vicki Sladden shows off artist Amanda Twomey's animal heads which are just some of the works on sale until tomorrow.

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Injured man struck by car

Originally published: Thursday, 9th September, 2010


A man suffered minor injuries on Tuesday when he was struck by a car in Wentworth.
Police said the 30-year-old man was walking on the road at the intersection of Alice and Murray Streets at about 5.50pm. The outside of a vehicle travelling east on Alice Street collided with the man, knocking him to the ground.
Police said the driver stopped to check on the man but was chased away by people who had been walking with him.
Police and ambulance officers attended the scene and treated the man, who was taken to Mildura Base Hospital suffering minor bruising and abrasions.
The driver returned a negative breath alcohol test and investigations are continuing.
* * *
Food was strewn across the Barrier Highway on Tuesday morning when a truck trailer rolled over.
Police said a 41-year-old Broken Hill man was driving a road train pulling two trailers about 55 kilometres from Wilcannia at 2am on Tuesday when the incident occurred.
The man was pulling out from a truck stop when saw he was too close to the road's edge and over-corrected, causing his rear trailer to stray onto the unsealed side of the road.
The earth was soft due to recent train and the rear trailer rolled onto its side, suffering extensive damage and spilling the food products it was carrying onto the roadway.
The truck cabin and front trailer both remained upright and undamaged.
Police issued the driver with a warning.

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Ambrose anyone?

Originally published: Thursday, 9th September, 2010

A golf day will be held on Sunday in memory of a local nine-year-old and to raise money for the Leukaemia Foundation.

The four-man ambrose will begin at 11pm at the BH Golf and Country Club to raise money in the name of Will Kuerschner, who died from leukaemia late last year.
The president of Club Legion, Bill Graham, said the event was being staged by the club with the help of local businesses.
Mr Graham said the money raised would also help build a village to accommodate cancer patients in Adelaide.
He said the club and other businesses had donated hundreds of dollars worth of trophies for the event.
Club Vice-president Les McQuillan is encouraging everyone to come along and attend the day.
"We're encouraging lots of people to come out ... it is for a worthy cause," Mr McQuillan said.
"We're hoping for some good weather. It has been forecast for a good day on Sunday ... we hope it is sunny," he said.
Howard Steer has donated a painting valued at $900 which is being raffled and the winner will be drawn on Sunday.
Prizes will be available for the top ladies' team and a perpetual shield will be given out in memory of Will.
There is also a $500 open order hole-in-one on the second hole only, according to Mr McQuillan.
Food and refreshments will be available on course and nibbles will be available after the game.
The day will cost $20 for members, $25 for non-members and $10 for juniors.
Mr McQuillan and Mr Graham extended their thanks to all who donated for this event.


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Foundation appeals for local support

Originally published: Wednesday, 8th September, 2010

Locals are being urged to give from the heart and support the Heart Foundation Doorknock Appeal this month.

Allan Pearce will be part of the army of 110,000 volunteers across Australia knocking on doors to help raise money for the Heart Foundation.
Mr Pearce said the apppeal runs throughout the month and would give the Foundation a chance to raise more money.
He said people who door knock will be given specific areas to collect in.
Mr Pearce participates with his son and is passionate about supporting the Heart Foundation after losing two uncles and a grandfather to heart disease.
This is Mr Pearce's third year door knocking. Not only does it give him time with his son, but it's also an opportunity to raise awareness about the worthwhile cause.
"My family is very aware of the impact that heart disease can have on your loved ones ... the Doorknock Appeal is an amazing way to raise funds for research into heart disease," Mr Pearce said.
"There is a history of heart disease in our family and we thought we could do it as a father and son team.
"We want to encourage people to donate as much as possible ... (heart disease) could happen to anyone," Mr Pearce said.
"Please dig deep into your pockets and support the cause."
According Heart Foundation CEO NSW Tony Thirlwell the money raised by the Doorknock Appeal will help fund research and community projects to improve awareness, prevention and treatment of heart disease and stroke.
To recognise volunteers and open your door with confidence, you can check that the collector is wearing a badge with the Heart Foundation's logo and the words "Volunteer Collector Official Identification Badge."
The badge also has the volunteer's ID number and an expiry date of September 30. Collectors will also have an official receipt book and a small Heart Foundation bag.
All donations $2 and over are tax-deductible and the volunteer can give receipts.
If you're not home when one of the volunteers visit, you can make a credit card donation directly with the Heart Foundation Doorknock Hotline 1800 55 22 55 or by visiting www.heartfoundation.org.au/Doorknock.


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Ley vows to fight on

Originally published: Wednesday, 8th September, 2010

The Federal Member for Farrer said she was disappointed about the formation of an independent-backed Labor government.

The final House of Representatives count was 76-74 to the ALP, making Julia Gillard the first female prime minister ever elected.
Despite the decision, which comes as the Coalition leads the two-party preferred vote count at 50.01 per cent to Labor's 49.99 per cent, Sussan Ley, who foreshadowed the outcome on Monday, said she wanted to work with the government on issues effecting the city and the region.
"(I'm) very, very disappointed obviously, however I'm determined to work with whatever ministers are sworn in ... to progress the issues that are important to Broken Hill and the far west and continue to be an effective local representative."
After 17 days of waiting for the outcome of the federal election, the three rural independents finally showed their political hands yesterday, with north Queensland's Member for Kennedy, Bob Katter, breaking ranks from the trio early in the day to support the Coalition.
New England MP Tony Windsor then gave his support to the ALP, making it impossible for the Coalition to form government. A tense wait followed while the MP for the northern NSW seat of Lyne, Rob Oakeshott, outlined his reasons for taking the direction he did before announcing support for a Julia Gillard-led government.
Ms Ley said she was not surprised that Mr Katter had sided with the Coalition.
"I could never see how Bob Katter could have gone with Gillard (because of) the issues he's really passionate about (like the) live cattle export which his electorate relies upon."
One of the reasons messrs Windsor and Oakeshott gave for supporting a Gillard government was that it appeared more stable, given it was less likely to go back to the polls. Ms Ley said that was a bad idea.
"I think that was not a good decision to make because they (the independents) said the Coalition would win. That's what they admitted in the press conference. They are basing (their decision) on a positive not a negative."

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Local nurse battles famous Kokoda Track

Originally published: Wednesday, 8th September, 2010

Faced with muddy slopes, dense tropical forest and climbs of 400 vertical metres; a local nurse has battled through the toughest ten days of her life.

Elissa Tweedie, 28, took to the challenge of the Kokoda Track recently, and although some days were tough, she said it was "amazing".
"It's one of those things I can't describe," Ms Tweedy said.
"It's the best thing ever."
For almost two weeks Ms Tweedie trekked with a group of Australians and local porters for more than 96 kilometres, which included days walking three hours through thick tropical forests.
Ms Tweedie said the journey wasn't as difficult as she thought it would be.
She said after seeing old war photos from troops in Kokoda, her experience was "nothing like it."
The group were provided with luxuries such as three-course dinners and not having to pack up and un-pack tents on the trip.
She said the fifth day of the trip, which included climbing 400 vertical metres to Taipan Gap, was the hardest day out of them all.
Ms Tweedie chose to attempt the track after her pilgrimage to another war site two years ago.
"I went to Gallipoli in 2008, and I thought why not do Kokoda."
Ms Tweedie said the media's portrayal of the Kokoda area following the deaths of hikers and a fatal plane crash was nothing at all like what she experienced.
She said the best part of the trip was Isurava Battlefield, where the group stopped for a dawn service and ended their 6000 metre trek.
Despite the amazing time the 28-year-old experienced, she said her family was coming to terms with it more than she was.
"My father was worried on the last day because I didn't (call him)."
Ms Tweedie said the plane was very small and she was anxious about the trip to Port Moresby.

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Ley tips Gillard

Originally published: Tuesday, 7th September, 2010

The local federal member believes that Julia Gillard will be the next prime minister of Australia.

On the eve of what could be the naming of Australia's 28th prime minister, the Member for Farrer, Sussan Ley, said it was looking increasingly likely that the three independent MPs would not support the Coalition.
Bob Katter, Rob Oakeshott and Tony Windsor, all former National Party-turned Independent MPs, hold the key to forming government after neither of the major parties got the required 76 seats to form a government.
Today they are on the verge of making a decision on who to support, finally putting an end to the question asked at the August 21 election, who will run the country for the next three years.
Ms Ley said despite all three independents coming from country areas, it appeared they would side with Labor.
"I think it's becoming increasingly unlikely that they'll support the Coalition," Ms Ley said yesterday.
After securing the support of Tasmanian Greens MP Andrew Wilkie last week, Labor now holds 74 of the 150 House of Representatives seats and needs just two more seats to retain power. The Coalition has 73 seats and would need support from all three independents to form government.
Ms Ley said given the MPs were likely to support Labor, and contrary to belief that the Coalition was conspiring for another election, there was not much chance of voters going back to the polls.
"I think it's unlikely. In spite of people suggesting that we (the Coalition) are conspiring to go back to the polls we are not," she said.
"Going back to the polls is a last resort.
"It wouldn't be a good idea and it's expensive. This is the parliament that the people (elected) and we will work to make it work."
She forecast confusing times ahead if Labor was elected but said it would be business as usual for her.
"What can we expect? A lot of confusion but we will all act on our responsibilities in good faith to get the best possible outcome for Australia," Ms Ley said.
"My job as a local member in a sense is the same.
"I will be taking to Canberra all of the issues that I have got in my (electorate) including projects for Broken Hill like the racecourse, the mining tax - we're not going to have a mining tax that affects Broken Hill - and the Menindee Lakes."

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Supporters make night a success

Originally published: Tuesday, 7th September, 2010

Despite 55 kilometre per hour winds the Friends of Leukaemia's fundraiser, Light the Night was well-attended.

Even though the sky wasn't awash with gold, white and blue light on Saturday night, about 250 people turned out to celebrate the night in the YMCA hall.
Organiser Katie Maxwell said the night would go on whether it was rain, hail or shine, and it did.
"It was just too windy, so we set up in the YMCA," Mrs Maxwell said.
Friends of Leukaemia is a local group which was formed to support patients suffering from cancer and their families and to raise awareness.
Light the Night entailed buying a balloon, or making a donation and collecting a balloon, then gathering at twilight to carry the balloons, which had a tiny light inside.
There were three different coloured balloons available: Gold represented remembering a loved one that has been lost, white celebrated being a blood cancer survivor and blue meant giving hope and showing support.
Mrs Maxwell said the night and the support was amazing.
"The show of support was just brilliant," she said.
Mrs Maxwell said the weather prevented a planned walk, but the intimacy and the closeness of the community event was even better.
Mrs Maxwell said the balloon lights lit up everything.
"It was amazing night ... just brilliant," she said.
A merry-go-round was set up inside for the children and a sausage sizzle was provided with drinks and coffee.
"It was new for Broken Hill and it was the first time anything like this has been attempted. It has made a lot more people aware," Mrs Maxwell said.
She said it was a beautiful night and people were coming up to her saying how inspirational it was.
"We couldn't have been happier ... being together in close surroundings was just a beautiful feeling," Mrs Maxwell said.
Light the Night aims to be a night for the whole family and will help support sufferers of blood cancers such leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma.
"The money raised from the night is going towards a village being built in Adelaide for country and regional patients," said Mrs Maxwell.
"Most Broken Hill (cancer) patients attend the Royal Adelaide Hospital or the Flinders Hospital ... treatment for a blood cancer can take three months and up to two years."
"The village will be like a home away from home."
How much was raised on Saturday has yet to be calculated.

The next event planned by Friends of Leukaemia is a movie premiere on September 26.

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Winds raise the roof

Originally published: Tuesday, 7th September, 2010

The clean-up continued yesterday after the city was lashed by high winds on Saturday.

Wind speeds from 28km/h and peaking up to 55km/h at about 3pm meant local State Emergency Service crews were kept busy on Saturday.
They answered 19 calls for assistance, ranging from fallen trees, leaking roofs and damaged homes.
Police said it was lucky no-one was injured when wind blew the roof off a house in Silver Street.
The entire back panel of the roof was ripped off before landing in the street on top of two cars, police said.
The cars received only superficial damage and police said the only reason the corrugated iron roof did not go further was that it was stopped by a traffic sign.
Regional general manager of Country Energy Guy Chick said there was no loss of power to homes in the city during the windy weather.
"Several rural properties out of Wilcannia were affected and we had one rural property in Tibooburra affected, but nothing in the Broken Hill area," Mr Chick said.
"Our network has held up up tremendously well."
The airport recorded the highest wind gusts with a maximum of 65km/h. The temperature peaked at 14 degrees.
Local weatherman Philip Mew said the city received 14mm of rain up to 8pm on Saturday, which was "not bad" for this time of the year.
"Hopefully we don't get these winds again," Mr Mew said.
But he didn't rule the possibility out.
"Anything can happen at the start of spring."

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Kelly scoops awards

Originally published: Tuesday, 7th September, 2010

North's Jayden Kelly is the 2010 Lionel Johnston Medal winner.
The Musicians' Club last night played host to the event which was attended by a huge audience.
Kelly compiled a massive 34 votes to become the 20th Bulldog to win the coveted individual award.
Kelly has spent the past few years with Central Districts in the SANFL and his game and endurance has improved dramatically, and that was evident for all to see in 2010.
He has been a standout for the Bulldogs in a midfield that already boasts two Lionel Johnston Medalists.
Nineteen votes away from Kelly in second place was Central's young gun, Ben Camilleri.
Already on an AFL scholarship with Collingwood, Camilleri has shown a maturity and poise at either end of the ground and it's something of an understatement to say he has a very bright future.
The night was extra special for Kelly, as he also took out the Mail Medal for 2010, and in doing so he became the 18th player to win both medals in the same year.
He is the 6th Bulldog to claim the double. The last time the feat was achieved was back in 2003.
The Mail Medal was introduced to local football in 1958 and is voted on by the umpires. It is awarded to players in many competitions across South Australia.
Runner-up to the 2010 Mail Medal is Central playmaker Justin Heath. Heath again has had another consistent year for the Magpies.
The Frank Thomas Best Junior award was won by South young gun Cody Schorn, who polled 37 votes.
Schorn's first full year at League level has been an exceptional one. His maturity and desire at the contest is equal to any player in the local league.
Schorn also becomes the 20th South junior to win the Best Junior award.
A team's defence is usually the backbone of any side and in 2010 North's Matt Dempster has been a standout.
His straight through approach, desire and never-give-in attitude has seen him win the Credit Union Smart Savers award for 2010.
It is Dempster's third Smart Saver win and he has become the fourth player to claim the award back to back.

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Potential showcased

Originally published: Monday, 6th September, 2010

Max Potential participants delivered their final projects at a Showcase Expo held at Club Legion Club recently.

The successful program began in March, for its second year.
Max Potential is a leadership program that brings together people from the community who coach young adults and help them look at their ideas for success and achieving their goals. It is funded by Clubs NSW.
Each student had a coach to help them learn about leadership and the community and complete a community project.
When the program began six months ago, co-ordinator Kirsten Brumby said there was no real criteria to Max Potential.
"The students just have to be open to looking at how they think and attitudes to personal leadership," Ms Brumby said.
The program brought together Year 10 and 11 students and one year 12 student from Willyama High, BH High and Menindee High.
In April the project manager, Wayne Deeth, said Max Potential was good for the benefits of using leadership, meeting new people and having fun.
The Showcase Expo was about creating conversations that allowed members of the public to understand the learning that has taken place in the lives of the young participants involved.
Each of the 18 students set up a "booth" to display their project and inform locals about what had taken place over the past six months.
During the Showcase, testimonials from the coaches and students were given.
Max Potential connects young people with other leaders in their local community. This gives young adults the opportunity to work with someone who shows an interest in their future.

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Recline, recover

Originally published: Monday, 6th September, 2010


Two electric recliner chairs have been donated to the Operating Theatre and Day Surgery at the local hospital.

The Musicians Club donated the money for the two chairs which cost $2395 each.
Sue Beahl, the Nurse Unit Manager Operating Theatres and Day Surgery, said the chairs were DalCross Premium Omega electric lift recliners.
Ms Beahl said the new chairs had advantages all round.
"There is more comfort for patients when they are recovering from the anesthetic from surgical procedures ... it is easier for staff ... who are at risk of developing shoulder injuries (with the manual chairs)," Ms Beahl said.
"The patients love them ... every patient comments on how comfortable and how enjoyable their experience has been (with the new recliners)," she said.
"We appreciate the Musicians Club for supporting us."
Vice president of the Musicians Club Mr Charlie Sultana said the club had a hard decision to make, but it was believed the hospital was a fitting recipient.
"The club gets many requests and they are judged on merit ... the board and management thought it was a worthy cause," Mr Sultana said.
"It was a unanimous decision to help the hospital out," he said.
The chairs recline and lift again at the touch of a remote control, which makes it easier for elderly patients to get in and out of the chairs.

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Dummies give new life

Originally published: Monday, 6th September, 2010

The Democratic Club has breathed new life into St John's by donating two resuscitation dummies to help train volunteers.

The club donated two dummies to the value of $2,236 each to assist with training cadets and volunteer paramedics.
The donation comes at a good time for St John, as their only dummy is close to 15 years old, and the service has treated 114 incidents this year alone.
Superintendent Sandra Haring was "very, very thankful" to the Club for their generous donation.
"It will definitely help with the training of our cadets at St John," Ms Haring said.
"The old dummies are just really dead."
Democratic Club duty manager Peter Hynes said it was just good to give something back to the community.
"The Demo Club is showing support to the community of Broken Hill," Mr Hynes said.
It has a long history of donating back to the community; last year they donated portable DVD players for patients to watch while they were receiving dialysis.
St John cadets recently returned from Molong where several cadets took out titles in the Western Region Cadet and First Aid Competitions.


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Nathan will Light the Night

Originally published: Friday, 3rd September, 2010

A local teenage blood cancer survivor is among the "balloon ambassadors" named for the Leukaemia Foundation's Light the Night at Sturt Park.

Nathan Stacey, who was aged 14 when he was diagnosed with acute lymphocyctic leukaemia, joins Nick and Sherri Kuerschner and Katie Maxwell for the event tomorrow night.
The ambassadors are hoping local skies will be awash with gold, white and blue especially lit balloons to remember, celebrate and give hope to people with blood cancer.
Money raised from the event will fund much needed research into better treatments and cures and fund free Leukaemia Foundation support services to patients and their families. The services include free accommodation, transport, emotional support, financial assistance and education.
Nick and Sherri Kuerschner are joint Gold Balloon Ambassadors, Nathan is a White Balloon Ambassador and Katie Maxwell is the Blue Balloon Ambassador.
All three have been affected by a blood cancer diagnosis and have experienced the upheaval often felt by rural families who have to relocate to Adelaide for treatment.
Nick and Sherri lost their nine-year-old son William to leukaemia in December last year after lengthy treatment in Adelaide.
Broken Hill High School student Nathan will be carrying a white balloon with his friends to celebrate his survival.
Mrs Maxwell lost both her mother and sister to blood cancer and is a long time supporter of the Leukaemia Foundation.
Light the Night raised more than $1.2 million last year across Australia.
It is hoped that about 500 locals will take part in what Ms Maxwell describes as an inspiring and uplifting night, helping to raise $35,000.
The fundraiser which is being hosted by "Friends of Leukaemia".
"I would love to see a big response from the local community," said Ms Maxwell.
"It will go ahead whether its rain, hail or shine," she said.
Anyone is welcome to come and show their support. They don't have to know anybody who has suffered from a blood cancer.
"Come along and make a donation, even if you haven't registered or got a team together," she said.
"Be part of the experience."
Mrs Maxwell said Friends of Leukaemia would love to raise "$1 per person in Broken Hill" but "any amount that will go towards the village in Adelaide" will be fantastic.
The money will go towards a village being built in Adelaide for country and regional patients.
This village will be like a "home away from home" according to Mrs Maxwell, who praised locals for their support so far.
"People have been extremely generous, the support gained from the community has been overwhelming," she said.
"I urge everyone to come along and carry a balloon ... if it is cold we will rug up, nothing can compare to what cancer patients endure with their treatment and their journey."
A barbecue, drinks, chips and coffees will be available as well as a merry-go-round.
Registration opens at 5.30pm and the official opening is at 6pm. For more information or to register visit www.lightthenight.org.au.

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Tribute paid to Rob Seekamp

Originally published: Friday, 3rd September, 2010


The NSW parliament has been told that Broken Hill grazier Robert Seekamp was a champion for the education of children and property owners in the bush.

Mr Seekamp passed away due to an aircraft accident on 21 June.
Member for Murray-Darling John Williams on Wednesday told parliament that the loss of a grazier of such high stature in Broken Hill was being felt by all the people in the Western Division.
Mr Seekamp was born the only son of Hilary and Carl Seekamp and grew up on Woolcunda Station, a property he owned up until his death and shared with his wife Vic and his children, Tara, Tim, Angus, Adrian and Josh.
Mr Williams said a lot of grief was associated with his passing.
"Rob Seekamp was an exceptional person in my opinion.
"He was totally and utterly committed to the education of students in the remote areas of New South Wales.
"Rob joined the Isolated Children's Parents Association (ICPA) and later became the President of the association from 1994 until 1998. He was on the NSW State Council from 1998 until 2004.
"During this time Rob was totally and absolutely committed to ensuring that children in isolated regions got the best possible education.
"Rob was the Chairman of the Committee for Allison House Students Accommodation, a residential facility that provides accommodation for isolated school students in Broken Hill.
"Rob was also the local convener for Volunteers for Isolated Students Education, an organisation that allows retired teachers to come into the remote areas of NSW and provides educational assistance for young students who are trying to progress themselves in those areas.
As the Chairman of the Pastoralists' Association of West Darling, he was committed to ensuring that all pastoralists got a fair and equitable deal and he did not miss an opportunity with regard to commitment by governments to the grazing fraternity.
"Rob was a committee member for the Broken Hill Agricultural Fair from its inception; he worked very hard to ensure the organisation's success.
"Rob was certainly a champion for the education of children in the bush and for graziers in the bush. Rob will be sadly missed by all.
"It has been a very sad time for the Western Division. Rob died before his time; I know he had a lot more to give. Unfortunately he was taken at this time. Vale Rob Seekamp," Mr Williams said.

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Film festival for freedom

Originally published: Friday, 3rd September, 2010

A national campaign aimed at getting young Australians excited about having the freedom to vote comes to the city next week.

The campaign takes the form of a series of film festivals that will be launched here with the screening of the film Broken Hill.
The festival is supported by Constitution Education Fund Australia and that organisation's events manager, Ms Stephanie Lorenzo, was in the city this week to encourage participation.
Ms Lorenzo said the festival helped to promote the Australian political system and government.
"From a personal point of view, I'm 25 and I never had an interest in politics ... my dad showed me how to vote and it was something that wasn't taught at school then," she said.
"That's why we need to find new ways to appeal to the younger generation and make our system of government and constitution interesting and 'cool by association' ... so people understand the importance of it," she said.
Ms Lorenzo said locals should appreciate how "great we have it in Australia".
The film festival begins on September 11 here with the first screening of "Broken Hill".
The Executive Director of CEFA, Kerry Jones, said 1.4 million eligible voters were not enrolled to vote and that number was increasing every year.
"Over half of the young Australian population don't seem to know, or care, that we're a democracy," she said.
This is why the Constitution Education Fund Australia run educational film festivals.
"Broken Hill" will be used to educate students on the law and the importance of not breaking the law.
Mrs Jones said that Broken Hill was a great place to hold a film festival launch.
"(Broken Hill) is a great icon for Australian film," she said.
The two main reasons the festival is being launched here is because the movie is called "Broken Hill" and it sheds light on the fact that Australia is so great because of its regional areas.
"We want to help market Broken Hill and get more people aware of these areas," Ms Lorenzo said.
About 400 tickets will be sold for the launch.
Locals can choose to buy a ticket for $25 and attend a function at the BH Regional Art Gallery before going to the film or pay just $15 if they only want to see the film.
Only 200 tickets will be sold for the function at the Art Gallery, which will include canapes and refreshments, and will begin at 6pm.
The film will begin at 7pm and run through until 9pm.
School sessions will also be held on the following Monday and Tuesday after the launch which will cost $5 per student.
Tickets can be booked online at www.auscivics.org.au, by calling 1800 009 855 or by contacting Stephanie on 0488 042 413.

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Ricciuto pays city a visit

Originally published: Friday, 3rd September, 2010

Shoppers at a local clothing and footwear store received a special treat yesterday when they were greeted by SA football great Mark Ricciuto.

The retired Crows 300-gamer and former captain was in the city as an ambassador for Steel Blue work boots and to re-open Work Clobber on Rakow, which had been closed for renovations.
As well as spending the afternoon signing autographs and meeting fans, he visited the Perilya and CBH mines.
Ricciuto retired in August 2007 and since then has devoted much of his energy to his hotel businesses in Adelaide and Port Lincoln. He also commentates on Triple M radio.
Mark was born in Waikerie, SA and was recruited by the Adelaide Crows in 1992. His AFL debut came in 1993 and he spent 14 years in the big league.
Mark is enjoying his retirement, but in terms of "taking it easy" he said he was busier than ever.
"In terms of body strain, it is a bit easier ... I had done as much as I could do," Mark said.
"I've been busy with my family and doing things like today."
When asked how he felt the Adelaide Crows had performed this year, Mark said it was probably the most disappointing year.
"I bet they are glad it (the season) is over," he said.
"But they have a pretty exciting future and it's the beginning of a new era with young players coming up."
Mark was pleased with local talent Taylor Walker.
"Taylor is starting to go pretty well ... as his confidence grows and his body matures he'll get better and better," Mark said.

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Labor 'still strong despite swing away'

Originally published: Thursday, 2nd September, 2010

The local Labor branch said support for the party remained strong despite more than 40 per cent of Broken Hill voting to have Tony Abbott elected as prime minister.

At the August 21 federal election, on a two-candidate preferred basis, the city gave Labor 59 per cent of the vote - down from 67 per cent in the 2007 election - while the Liberal Party achieved 41 per cent of Broken Hill's vote, up from 33 per cent in 2007.
The president of the Labor Party's local branch, Neville Gasmier, said while the Coalition did improve, it was not because people wanted Mr Abbott as leader.
"Not 41 per cent voted for Tony Abbott, 41 per cent voted for Sussan Ley, who was the incumbent," Mr Gasmier said.
"(And) they voted for Christian Emmery, who is a member they wanted to represent them in government as an ALP candidate."
Mr Gasmier acknowledged that the vote had fallen since the last election, however he said support for Labor remained fairly constant.
"There was no doubt in my mind that people responded well to the Kevin 07 election and that's reflected in the figures," he said.
"I think the support in the last election was overwhelming in Broken Hill (and) it was always going to be hard to maintain those figures.
"I think it's a fabulous effort for the people of Broken Hill to have continued to support Labor, and continually over many years.
"It's been around 60 to 70 per cent and that level for many years - it's 59 per cent this time around - it's continually 60."
While the results from the August 21 election are still unknown, with three rural independent MPs holding the key to unlocking the current political stalemate, moves to shore-up Labor's hold on government advanced yesterday with Greens MP Adam Bandt signing a deal with Prime Minister Julia Gillard.
Victorian Bandt gave his support to Ms Gillard and the Labor Party after a deal was struck to consider a number of key Greens reforms, including setting up a climate change committee, making investments in dental care and $20 million to look at high-speed rail on the east coast.
There will also be a parliamentary debate on Afghanistan and restrictions placed on political donations.
It moved Labor's tally to 73 seats while the Coalition remained at 72.
Counting continues in some seats while the key independent MPs, Bob Katter, Tony Windsor and Rob Oakeshott, continue to negotiate with Mr Abbott and Ms Gillard prior to their decision on who to support to form a minority government.
Mr Gasmier said the city should benefit as rural MPs were effectively set to decide the next government.
"I'm enthused that they are from rural and regional areas. That will give them a bit more understanding of the issues that face rural and regional Australia, in particular NSW and the far west," he said.
"Our challenge is to ensure they stay focused on not just their one electorate but the bigger picture."
While the branch has yet to dissect its performance, Mr Gasmier said the party was happy with the ALP and Mr Emmery's performance.
"There's no secret that we had a young candidate who performed exceptionally well for person who was unknown to the city," he said.
"The campaign was a particularly short one and it was always difficult for any non-incumbent or challenger to cover such a large geographical electorate, which includes Broken Hill, to give support to an unknown young person and I think he (did) an amazing job and at the end of the day the vote stayed around the 60 per cent mark."

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Grand old trip to Broken Hill

Originally published: Thursday, 2nd September, 2010

A 55-year-old train made its first trip to the city on Tuesday night.

The diesel locomotive 4204 was built in 1955 and the visit was a first for a 42 class locomotive.
It was one of six built by Clyde Engineering at Granville, NSW for State rail.
The locomotive is the pride and joy of the Lachlan Valley Railway Society Cooperative, a rail preservation society based in Cowra.
The society also has an assortment of operational steam and diesel locomotives as well as a fleet of heritage passenger railway carriages and "Tin Hare" rail motors in its collection.
The 4204 locomotive has a top speed of 115 kilometres per hour and was used to haul food and passengers, according to driver Bernie Baker.
The 42 class has about 1800 horse power, is 18.54 metres long and weighs about 116 tonnes.
It was relaunched into heritage service after an overhaul and repaint and has been under preservation since the mid 1980's.
Mr Baker, who is based in Parkes, said driving the locomotive was "classic stuff".
"It rides pretty good", Mr Baker said.
The locomotive held a dining car, a sitting car and a power van.


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Cross visit 'an honour'

Originally published: Thursday, 2nd September, 2010

Local students caught a glimpse of the MacKillop Cross when it arrived in the city yesterday as part of a national tour.

The pilgrimage sees the cross travel through NSW and Victorian dioceses in celebration of the nation's first saint, Mary MacKillop.
Knights of the Southern Cross chairman for Wilcannia-Forbes Kevin Shelley said he was pleased with the more than 70 people who turned out for the service at yesterday.
"It turned out really good, and I think in a way it will give them some history," Mr Shelley said.
Students from Sacred Heart Parish Primary School joined the remaining on-lookers as Mr Shelley gave them a run down on the history of Mother MacKillop and the cross.
Teacher Dianne Zammit was thankful for the opportunity the Knights of the Southern Cross had given the school.
"(It) was an honour to have the cross come through Broken Hill," Ms Zammit said.
"And to have our school be apart of it (was wonderful).
"It's a wonderful lead-up for the canonization of Mary MacKillop."
Ms Zammit said students had been told about Mother MacKillop's life story recently in conjunction with Mary MacKillop Feast Day on August 8.
Father Sunny Kannamkulam said the day was an important one for the city and Australia.
"It's a very blessed thing," Fr Sunny said.
"(It's a) special time for the whole church, especially the Australian church."
The cross leaves this morning on route to Nyngan.
The nearly three metre tall symbol will be end its pilgrimage in Sydney in October, just in time for the canonization of Mother MacKillop.
The cross will be hung at Mary MacKillop Place in Sydney, where Mother MacKillop's body resides.


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Feiry pottery treasures

Originally published: Thursday, 2nd September, 2010

Potters Society members will show off their "Fiery Treasures" tomorrow night when the 31st pottery exhibition opens.

The exhibition titled "Fiery Treasures," will showcase several different types of pottery - all made by members.
This is the first exhibition to be held since 2008.
"We use to have an exhibition every year, (but) last year we decided not to hold one so we've decided to hold them bi-annually now," exhibition committee member Vicki Sladden said.
Stone ware, raku, salt glaze, saw dust, cow dung, gas fire and electric fire works have been created by members whose skills range from beginners to advanced.
Students who attend classes every Tuesday are also displaying their work.
The group hold two craft fairs every year; one on Mother's Day and another for Christmas, and is looking for people who are interested to come down and try out the craft.
"We're a very active group," she said.
The exhibition is being opened by local artist Clark Barrett at 6.30pm at the Town Hall facade in Argent Street and will run until September 10.

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Spring is here

Originally published: Wednesday, 1st September, 2010

Today marks the start of spring and the end of NSW's coldest winter in 12 years.

The last day of winter had temperatures as low as 6 degrees and as high as 22, and they are set to increase over the coming week.
Local weatherman Philip Mew said he agreed that it would have been the coldest winter in 12 years for the state.
"There was a lot stronger wind during winter," he said.
Due to the cold wind, people felt colder than they would during calm weather.
He estimated that it was between one and two degrees cooler, compared to previous years.
"Compared with other years, even I've felt it."
Mr Mew said rainfall had also increased to a point where the city was being soaked every few days, in comparison to recent drought conditions.
"(It's been) just plain cold and that's it."
Spring however will bring relief to farmers this time around with the weather man predicting a better than average rainfall.
"I tend to agree with what the weather bureau say that we are definitely looking at better than average rainfall."
Up to the end of winter, he said the city had received more than 300mm of rain which was "well above average".
With the temperatures set to increase slightly over the coming days, he said for the next couple of months the temperatures would only "gradually" increase.
"(Temperatures will) creep up towards the end of September."
Mr Mew forecast temperatures for Labour Day weekend in October of between 25 and 30 degrees.


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Plague looms

Originally published: Wednesday, 1st September, 2010

The worst locust plague in decades is looming as rising temperatures trigger the hatching of tens of millions of eggs.

Four states, including large swathes of NSW, are set to experience swarms over the next few months as conditions become right for hatching.
Broken Hill won't be immune from the plaque, with the city located in one of four so-called risk zones which blanket parts of NSW, Victoria, South Australia and Queensland.
The zone Broken Hill is in extends east to White Cliffs and into Queensland and South Australia.
The NSW Department of Primary Industries said improved seasonal conditions and a combination of warm, wet weather earlier this year resulted in extensive locust egg laying across NSW.
In a newsletter released last week, the department said that while no hatchings had been reported yet, significant locust activity is expected in the Central West and Riverina areas of the State.
It said the recent cold weather had caused a slight delay in egg development, with hatching now predicted for late August in northern areas, during September in central areas (including around Broken Hill) and from the end of September in the Riverina.
Broken Hill got a taste of what's to come when a swarm of locusts passed through the city in April.
The Director of the Australian Plague Locust Commission, Chris Adriaansen, told the BDT that the outbreak was possibly the biggest in a decade.
But he said nymph hatchings in September would do far more damage.
The Commonwealth Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry said there were three generations of population increase over 2009-2010.
Despite intensive control of nymphs of the third generation in NSW, it said eggs laid in autumn would produce a further generation of high density nymphs this spring.
Nine Livestock Health and Pest Authority command posts have been established in NSW for the deployment of enough insecticide to treat more than half a million hectares of locusts state-wide.
In July the NSW Premier, Christina Keneally, announced an $18.5 million package to help farmers across the State protect crops and pastures.


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Merger no more

Originally published: Wednesday, 1st September, 2010

A merger of the city's two mining companies was now most unlikely, according to CBH Resources.

The base metal miner ceased to be an Australian company on Friday when a takeover by its majority shareholder, Toho Zinc, was completed.
But it was not that long ago that CBH, along with miner Perilya and many mining analysts, believed a merger was the best outcome for mining in Broken Hill citing financial, operating and strategic benefits.
An almost 12-month long merger deal, a failed take over bid and two foreign companies later, CBH Resources managing director Stephen Dennis said the unification of CBH and Perilya could not look further away.
"I think that's unlikely. The fact is now that a merger is not possible because of the new ownership structure," Mr Dennis said.
"Toho ... own Rasp and they will own Endeavor."
Analysts long believed a tie-up between the miners made sense, potentially saving hundreds of millions of dollars.
The year 2008 was taken up by an attempt to unite CBH Resources and Perilya, a silver, lead and zinc miner, to form a globally significant producer of lead and zinc; first through an agreed merger, valued at $489 million, and then with an unsolicited CBH takeover of Perilya.
Early in 2008, both companies admitted they were in merger discussions.
But by the end of June, Perilya had withdrawn its support for the merger saying while it was logical to combine the companies, the offer was inadequate. Perilya cited a number of reasons including better exploration results for its projects and an expected delay to the Rasp mine. By the end of July the friendly merger was terminated.
In early October CBH announced plans for a hostile takeover of Perilya who, after urging shareholders to take no action, finally, in mid-December, told them to reject the offer.
One month later, on January 20, 2009, CBH announced it had decided not to proceed with the takeover citing concern for Perilya's financial position and "continuation of unsustainable cash losses" during a period of depressed metal prices.
The potential marriage of CBH and Perilya had ended.
Not long after, a deal with Chinese zinc producer Shenzhen Zhonjgin Lingnan Nonfemet saw it take the majority share of Perilya - now extended to 52 per cent - while a battle for CBH, between Belgian-based Nyrstar and Toho, ended with the Toho acquisition.
The underlying issue for the CBH/Perilya merger was operational efficiency; Perilya had infrastructure, including an under-utilised concentrator, that could be filled by material from CBH's Rasp mine.
But Mr Dennis said with the giant Japanese zinc producer Toho Zinc now in charge of CBH it was likely that separate plant would be built to accommodate its ore.
"We're more inclined to look at a processing plant here for Rasp - a dedicated plant - and on that basis I think that makes the prospects of some kind of merger extremely unlikely."
In its final report to the market yesterday, CBH announced it had made a full year after tax profit of $9.399 million.

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A new dimension

Originally published: Wednesday, 1st September, 2010

The city's only cinema is set to become one of the few regional movie houses in Australia to be able to show 3D digital productions.

A new silver screen and 3D equipment is currently being installed at the local cinema and there are hopes that 3D movies will be shown on Friday.
The cinema is also in the process of installing a digital projector that will play 2D and 3D movies.
Silver City Cinema's John Wren said the film industry was changing to digital and the local changeover would keep the city up with the times.
"Digital is coming to Broken Hill in December and television sets have to change over (to digital) ... in the film industry it's already started and this time next year any theatres not on digital may as well close the doors," Mr Wren said.
"There was no other option but to organise with the distributors and go digital," he said.
"In time small theatres will close because they can't afford to go digital."
Mr Wren said that it was time to move ahead.
"This time next year, we would be too late," he said.
He said the new screen and digital equipment was well worth the effort and would provide another outlet of entertainment for locals.
"It's amazing isn't it," Mr Wren said.
Associated Sound Newcastle's Technical Manager, Barry Parsons, said the company was installing a new plastic silver screen with polarisation for 3D screenings.
"The boys are working hard putting it all up," Mr Parsons said.
"There will be a new NEC digital projector with a Dolby server and a Master Image 3D system," he said.
"It is the latest in cinema equipment."
Mr Parsons said only three cinemas in the western area had made the switch to screen 3D movies.
Mr Wren said the changeover meant it would be easier to get films and easier for the film companies, and a lot cheaper to provide films to the exhibitors more quickly.
The first screening of a 3D movie will be on Friday and the Silver City Cinema is offering an introductory price of $13.50 per person, plus a $2 fee for the reuseable 3D glasses.
After this the price of a 3D movie will go up to $16.50 per person, which Mr Wren said was "a lot cheaper than the capital cities".
As well as going 3D the Silver City Cinema is getting infra-red hearing aids for the hearing impaired.
Mr Wren said this was a big issue here and it was important to accommodate everyone.
"(Being hearing impaired) is a big issue in Broken Hill ... nobody will be left out," he said.
Mr Wren said he was happy about the change to the cinema.
"I'm happy I can do it ... it had to be done to bring better quality entertainment to Broken Hill," he said.
"It's our obligation to provide entertainment for the people of Broken Hill."




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