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News archive

This is an archive containing every news story ever posted on the BDT website. If you’re looking for a specific article, try the search box at the top right hand side of this page. Otherwise you can just browse the archive by selecting a year and month below.

April, 2021

Relentless Robins

Originally published: Wednesday, 28th April, 2021

The Robins were relentless and too strong for the Magpies, claiming a 72-point win in the ANZAC Day clash.
It was Central’s Ty Harvey who got on the board first with a goal, before West managed a few; firstly from Cohen Bates and then Brock Ellis kicked a couple to mark the start of a stellar game.
Next up was a goal from West’s Flynn Treloar in his debut League game, before Central’s Connor Martin managed a goal. Robbie Bates kicked a long bomb to goal after to siren and send West into the first break with a 19-point lead.
The second term kicked off with West’s Daniel Milne kicking his first goal of the day, shortly followed by a goal from Central young gun, Nick Devoy.
Josh Hanford was all over the ground and in everything early for Central, as well as Nick Devoy who was working hard with unreal second efforts.
Josh Cieslik was impressive for the Robins, he slotted a goal in the second quarter, before Brock Ellis kicked his third to finish up the first half. West led by 33 points at half time.
In the second half the Robins got into the swing, with their first goal of the quarter coming through Matt Nelson. Peter Christos then got himself on the board after a down field free kick to slot one through.
Brock Ellis kicked another major to make four and Rylie McInnes also booted one through the big sticks. West managed a 57 point lead at the final break.
To open the last quarter Bill Shipway added another goal on Central’s tally, before Brock Ellis capped of his day out with a fifth and final goal; he was strong in the lead up and marking and an accurate leg all day.
Daniel Milne wrapped up the game with a couple of late goals for three total, the Robins managed a huge 72-point win over the Magpies and remain undefeated at the end of Round Three.
Acting West Captain, Ty Andrews accepted a new trophy from RSL representative John Bacich and AFL Broken Hill Chairman, Andrew Schmidt on behalf of the Robins for their win in the 2021 ANZAC Day clash.
West showed great fight and consistency all day, their best on ground for the game was Jayden Sutton who continues to give relentless hard work across the ground. He was joined by Richard Sandow Medallist Brock Ellis, as well as Daniel Milne, Nick Schofield, Josh Cieslik and Cohen Bates.
Central may have been beaten but their effort and determination continues to stem, the hard working team refuse to give up until the final siren. Luke Barnes, Jake Picton, Josh Hanford Mat Sullivan, junior Nick Devoy and Cooper Oates were in their best players.
Full time score - West 15 10 (100) defeated Central 4 4 (28).

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Time for reflection

Originally published: Wednesday, 28th April, 2021

As a lone aircraft tracked above Argent Street at dawn on Sunday, Broken Hill veterans gathered in-person for the first time in two years to pay tribute to fallen comrades. They were joined at the cenotaph by a diverse crowd who were encouraged to reflect on the actions of the more than 100,000 Australians who, since that fateful day at Gallipoli 106 years ago, have made the ultimate sacrifice in service of the nation.
Speaking as guest of honour at both the dawn service and again at 11am, serving Naval Captain Adam Muckalt reiterated the point, reminding the crowd that while we “pause to commemorate the Anniversary of the landings on Gallipoli in 1915”, we must also take time to reflect on the commitment and sacrifice of the living, the men and women who have followed those original ANZAC’s in service of the nation, both “in war and in peace”. And those that continue to do so.
With last year’s ANZAC Day marked by Australians standing in their driveways, lighting a candle at dawn amid COVID-19 restrictions, Broken Hill RSL President Des Kennedy said it was “really great to be back” and was “thrilled” with the strong turnout.
“It was magic. Great weather, great numbers at both services. You couldn’t ask for more.”  
But COVID safe measures at many other services around the country left some feeling disconnected, the differences in rules at various events leading to anger and confusion.
A wire fence was set up around Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance for the dawn service limiting attendance to just 1400 people which infuriated some given 85,000 were permitted to gather at the MCG for the traditional ANZAC Day AFL match between Collingwood and Essendon.
While at the War Memorial in Canberra, over 6,500 people attended the dawn service and similar numbers were seen at the national ceremony held at 11am. Memorial Director Matt Anderson said the commemorative events were a strong indication of the continued dedication the Australian people have to the traditions of ANZAC Day.
“To welcome, in the midst of a global pandemic, thousands of veterans, defence force personnel, their families, members of the public and dignitaries across both the dawn service and national ceremony here at the Australian War Memorial is a powerful reminder of what matters to us as a nation,” Mr Anderson said.
A view, it seems, is shared by many in Broken Hill.

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NSW Government failing small business

Originally published: Wednesday, 28th April, 2021

New South Wales Legislative Council member Daniel Mookhey has come out firing over the unspent money from the NSW Government’s Small Business Stimulus package.
The opposition spokesman for finance and small business was in the city last week for the Western Divisions Council conference.
He said the Small Business Grants Stimulus package had $110 million left over.
“Of the 428 small businesses in Broken Hill, only 110 received support from the package.
“The package was aimed to create more jobs in western NSW, but instead over $110 million has been left.”
Mr Mookhey said the criteria for the grants were too harsh with many businesses not qualifying for it.
“With JobKeeper, businesses only had to have a 30 per cent downturn but the stimulus package criteria was too harsh.
“It also wasn’t open long enough. A lot of small businesses needed the help.”
Mr Mookhey suggested that the government needed to reopen the scheme and provide a better explanation on how to use it.
However, the Minister for Finance and Small Business accused Mr Mookhey of hitting below the belt.
“Instead of looking to score cheap political points, I’d encourage Daniel Mookhey to get out to the regions and actually see how this Government’s policies are making real differences for mum and dad business owners during a difficult 12 months,” Minister Damien Tudehope said.
“And instead of talking down our economic recovery, Mr Mookhey should be talking up our small business owners.
“He can start by promoting our great Dine & Discover program and encouraging businesses to get registered and for communities to shop local.”
According to Minister Tudehope, the NSW Government moved quickly in response to COVID 19, introducing a suite of small business measures, including a number of grants programs.
This funding was allocated on a state-wide basis.
“The Government closely monitors uptake of stimulus and support measures to ensure that measures are making a difference where they are needed most,” Minister Tudehope said.
“It was always about helping to keep businesses in business, and people in jobs. Some relief measures are dependent on applications and uptake.
“We are on track to spend the majority of stimulus funding that was allocated for this financial year and into the next.”
Minister Tudehope said Broken Hill’s employment levels have risen since COVID.
“What is amazing to see in Broken Hill, is the fact that payroll jobs in the Broken Hill and Far West area are now 4.4 per cent above pre-COVID levels, reflecting the recovery in the labour market across the state.”
The Small Business Support Grants opened on 14 April and had its closing date extended from 1 June to 30 June 2020.
The grant was paid out to 52,632 businesses at a total value of about $521 million.
After closing, the Government launched the Small Business Recovery Grant of between $500 and $3000, later expanding the criteria and extending the application date in response to feedback.
The Recovery Grant ran from 1 July 2020 to 31 August 2020, with 36,708 businesses receiving the grant at a total value of around $109 million.
In the Broken Hill LGA, 63 applicants received over $689,000 through the COVID-19 Small Business Support Grant and 41 applicants received over $122,000 through the COVID-19 Small Business Recovery Grant.

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Turn of the tide

Originally published: Saturday, 24th April, 2021

After several years without flows, water from what some have called a “once in a century” rain event has finally found its way down the Darling.
At around 10am Thursday, under the watchful eye of NSW Water Minister Melinda Pavey, the gates were finally opened to Lake Menindee, the largest lake of nine in an eon’s-old system that is arguably Australia’s most important inland fish breeding nursery.
They say that whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting over and the fight over environmental flows for the Murray Darling has been a long one, a constantly evolving and persistently bitter debate between states and within states.
And so as not to disappoint, within minutes of what Menindee local and long-time water advocate Graham McCrabb described as a “momentous moment,” the gloves were off, with the Minister immediately taking a swipe at South Australia.
“Menindee has as much right to this water as those in the Adelaide area do to have their lakes full,” Minister Pavey said.
“It’s vital to culture, it’s vital to the environment. I don’t want a fight about it. I just want a grown-up conversation.”
South Australia is of course rightly pushing for as much flow as possible to deal with their own critical environmental issues, namely the fragile ecosystems of the Coorong. An issue that the Minister deftly batted away.
“They’ll have flow anyway. If there’s anything we’ve learned in the last 12 months is that SA did not suffer from the drought. Some of their farmers may have missed their allocations but we have kept that river flowing.”
Yet despite flows being maintained in the Murray, the Darling did stop. Graham McCrabb concedes the catastrophic fish kill that resulted from that lack of flow in January of 2019 – an event that
saw possibly millions of native fish perish – pushed the town and the delicate environment to the brink.
“We saw 30-year-old cod dying. They died in the fish kill and they were dying 12 months on. I’ll never see fish like that again. Not in my lifetime.”
It wasn’t just the iconic Murray Cod that were affected by the lack of flows.
The bulk of the Golden Perch for the Murray Darling system, which includes rivers as far east as the Goulburn, breed in the Menindee Lakes. Current stocks are good but had there not been the recent rains, according to Graham, it would have been another disaster.
“We would have lost those fish for sure.”
Yet with water, there is hope – and hope for the community too.
“Water NSW talk about the impact of flows and the social benefits are startling when water arrives. To see this water going in here is a significant moment. It’s five years since these gates were opened. Just last week I was talking to people who believed they’d never see again. Without doubt, it’s a psychological boost”.
And it will be a substantial tourism boost to the area as well.
Mr McCrabb anticipated thousands will come to see the water, contributing enormously to the economy of the little town that has in recent times, as a result of an environmental travesty, developed an increasingly big national voice. But the battle to maintain sustainable flows for the Lower Darling is far from won.
“For every megalitre that gets past someone’s dam there’s the argument that they could have made money off that water,” he said.
“And we’re down here trying to get the dregs of that. And it’s not just the northern basin in NSW. Queensland draws a lot of water through floodplain harvesting too.”
As with everything, there’s only so much the river can take.
“We’re doing damage all the time. Where’s the point of no return? I don’t know but until we start going forwards that point is inevitably going to come. Point of no return? We’re closing in on it rapidly. Where it is you don’t know until you get there.”

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Codie calls time

Originally published: Saturday, 24th April, 2021

A veteran and legend of the North Football Club, Codie Howard, has called time on his illustrious career after almost twenty years.
Howard said retirement from footy has been on his mind for 12 to 18 months.
“After 2019 where I was coaching as well I was pretty tired, I don’t like to say burnt out but probably close to.
“I did do preseason last year leading into the season that was called off and had a bit of relief that there was no season and that’s probably the first that it really kind of clicked.
“Then I went out for the start of preseason this year, got a couple weeks in not really there and then about a month ago it was the final decision that I was going to finish up.”
Howard said he won’t have much free time without football as he’s currently studing a Bachelor of Business and work is taking up a lot of his time.
“So between that will be a lot of overdue time spent with Holly (wife).”
Just because he won’t be running around on the field anymore doesn’t mean Howard won’t be at the football cheering on the blue and white from time to time.
“I’ve been both games this year because there’s a lot of milestones and a lot of people playing 200 games so I’ll definitely be down there cheering them on but it’ll make a big difference with the three or four extra nights worth of training and recovery and all that.”
Howard has amassed a 262 game career, in that time he won seven premierships; five of which were as captain, two Lionel Johnston Medal’s, two North Football Club Best and Fairest awards and over 200 goals to his name.
He also captained the Bulldogs for a total of eleven seasons, from 2004 to 2016 and then again in 2018.
He said premierships are definitely what he considers his greatest achievement.
“The team awards or accolades are definitely a lot better, having that you’ve got a whole club and everyone involved.
“I’ve been very proud of captaining the North Footy Club at a young age and for the amount of time that I did and also longevity, so 200 games, 250 games, they were milestones that I was very, very proud of.
“I debuted in A Grade in 2003, so it was in and out that first year and then probably cemented by spot in 2004 under Dave Ruddock and we went on to win the premiership that year and from there it’s just been repeat, repeat for the rest of the career.”
Standout memories both on and off field for Howard all surround friendships.
“As I said before premierships, but then certain moments in those premierships, probably not personally for myself but what teammates have done are the ones I think fondly of.
“Being able to play the majority of my career with a few of my best mates; Mat Garrick, Jayden Kelly, Jake Borlace, Blake Clare, Ed Morgan and Keenan Ellis, I was absolutely honoured to be able to play all my career with those guys.
“And also a lot of other friends that either came to town for a couple of years and moved away or younger lads that have come up and moved away and still holding friendships with a lot of them, so that’s probably what I hold most dear is those friendships that are made through the on field.”
Howard is among the best in Broken Hill football and has therefore played and against a few of his calibre.
“Jayden Kelly is obviously the best player that I’ve played with or seen locally, he’s just out and out freak what he can do.
But I’ve been lucky to play under some really good leaders that I’ve looked up to so players like Brendon Price, Brett Johnson, Jamie McConnell and Jason Harwood, I really looked up to them early on and they really helped with my career.
“Playing against I had a lot of good battles with the players from other sides who weren’t as tall, who probably matched me. One was Tim Ferguson definitely, early on in my career Tim and I used to play on each other a lot and then also Billy Dolan, Phil Neal some good contests and good friendships through those contests. I’d also have to say Justin Heath, he’s one of the most skilful players I’ve seen for an opposition player, the way his big kick could change a game, it was bad to watch but it was good to watch at the same time.”
Howard touched on what he would miss most about playing footy.
“Not the training itself, but the comradery at training so I’m not going to miss the hard running and all that, I’ll miss spending a lot of time with everyone and probably feel that little bit left out I suppose, not being in every part of it which a lot of retired players have said is the hardest.
“But I know personally that I’m ready to finish, it’s time and even the last two weeks I’ve enjoyed watching from the sidelines and especially with a lot of young talented kids coming up, seeing them get their chance and being able to move onto the next phase.”

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Front line fight

Originally published: Saturday, 24th April, 2021

As they say, “It never rains, it pours.” And with the Western Divisions local government conference in town during the week, a once in a decade bureaucratic rain event saw a bucket load of politicians descend on Broken Hill.
And as the gates were about to be opened at Menindee, Member for Parkes Mark Coulton, a part of the political inundation, took time out to visit the RFDS COVID vaccination clinic, where he got a first-hand look at the front line administration of the COVID vaccine.
“What’s really heartening is that despite the fact that we haven’t had a case in Broken Hill for close to 12 months, the people here still realise they are vulnerable and they have responded to that,” Mr Coulton said.
According to the RFDS, the take up rate from people as they become eligible for the vaccine has been extremely high, despite concerns in some parts of the country regarding possible side effects.
A concern Mr Coulton was quick to put into perspective.
“As a government we are trying to balance being cautious with being optimistic.
“As more people receive the vaccine and we don’t hear the horror stories I’m certain by the end of the year we’ll see a more positive attitude towards it.”
Australia-wide, close to 1.2 million doses are reported as having been administered to date with approximately six people in every thousand experiencing what is termed “an adverse reaction”.
The most common symptoms of those “adverse reactions” being headache, nausea, muscle aches and fever.
Cases of extreme responses are in line with historical averages for most vaccines and many of those reactions are thought to be linked to unspecified underlying health conditions.
However Australia’s vaccination rate is still being slowed by supply issues and with this in mind, news that the Victorian State Government has committed $50 million towards establishing a facility to manufacture the “new age” Pfizer and Moderna-style vaccines in Melbourne comes as something of a panacea.
Both are innovative ‘mRNA’ type vaccines, inoculations that many are calling the future of epidemiology.
Where traditional vaccines inject a benign version of the virus itself to produce an immune reaction, the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines instead deliver a genetic code from the virus that teaches our own cells how to make the viral protein necessary to combat the infection.
This leads to an immune response that is far more powerful than in conventional vaccines.
In addition they are both easier and quicker to manufacture and also much simpler to reconfigure as new viral mutations appear.
Australia currently lacks the ability to manufacture mRNA type vaccines, which has left the country reliant on imports from Europe and the US.
Acting Premier of Victoria James Merlino estimated the cost of the new facility to be in the hundreds of millions but said a portion of the state’s $2 billion research fund, announced in last year’s budget, could be used to contribute to the cost which he hoped would be shared with the Federal government.
Mr Merlino said the Victorian government had written to Prime Minister Scott Morrison and been in contact with Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt about the plan but had yet to receive a response.

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Max comes home

Originally published: Wednesday, 21st April, 2021

The Minister for Western NSW Adam Marshall announced that the long-awaited prequel to George Miller’s Academy Award-winning ‘Mad Max IV: Fury Road’ will be partially filmed in the Broken Hill region.
Furiosa, starring Chris Hemsworth, Anya Taylor-Joy and Yahya Abdul Mateen II is set to begin filming in June, with a release date set for June 23, 2023.
It is expected to become the biggest film ever made in Australia and the largest production filmed in NSW.
Former mayor Wincen Cuy was  part of Council’s extremely pro-active team that encouraged film projects in Broken Hill.
With a designated filming officer, Lyndall Roberts, the old power station had been bought and repurposed as a film studio precinct for Film Broken Hill and ‘Mad Max IV: Fury Road’ was in pre-production in Broken Hill.
The Globe Home Timber and Hardware building in Galena Street was, at that time, a vacant building which was used to store and work on approximately 20 Mad Max vehicles. “There was a duplicate of each type of vehicle so if one was written off, there was a back-up,” Wincen recalled.
Fake weaponry was also designed, made and stored there and provided employment for the local steel industry, carpentry and wood suppliers.
Wincen estimated that the influx of cast, crew, pre- and post-production staff, caterers, and designers brought two million dollars into the Broken Hill economy.
Unfortunately, longed-for rain ended production of ‘Mad Max IV: Fury Road’and Winston believes that this prevented $10 million from being injected into our local economy.
“Furiosa is expected to support more than 850 local jobs and bring in around $350 million into the NSW economy,” said NSW Premier, Gladys Berejiklian.
Director, Dr. George Miller, welcomes the return of his Mad Max franchise to Australia, and he thanked Screen Australia and Screen NSW saying that “the support of the Federal and New South Wales Governments were pivotal”.
The NSW Government’s $175 million ‘Made in NSW’ fund and ‘PDV Rebate’, for Post, Digital and Visual Effects, and the Federal Government’s 40 per cent ‘Producer Offset’ helped to secure the production for NSW.
Treasurer Dominic Perrottet said that NSW employs 56 per cent of the Australian screen industry.
“It’s showtime in NSW and that means jobs, not just for the arts but right across the trades, hospitality and transport sectors, as well.”

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AFLW premiership glory for West great

Originally published: Wednesday, 21st April, 2021

After a 13-year career as a AFL player with both West Coast and the Brisbane Lions, last Saturday Brent Staker finally got to feel the euphoria of premiership success as a coach.
He was a part of the coaching staff, that engineered a brilliant Brisbane AFL Women’s victory over the Crows at Adelaide Oval, last Saturday afternoon, April 17, on Grand Final day.
Going into the game as distinct underdogs, the Lions played with more intent and aggression than their hosts, but led by only five points at the long interval.
After an outstanding third quarter, the Lions set up the victory and would run out victors by 18 points, 6.2 (38) to 3.2 (20) sparking riotous celebrates.
“It is a wonderful feeling, and certainly one of the highlights of my football life,” Staker said post game.
“My mum, Rosemary and dad, Allen (known in the Broken Hill community as Badger) were in the crowd, with all the Brisbane supporters, at the northern scoreboard end goals area.  
“It was great that the girls went up to the goal square with their premiership medals and the cup, to show they appreciation.”  
Staker has been an assistant to senior coach Craig Starcevich, looking after the defence, which played such a key role in the triumph over the favourites on Grand Final day.
With the AFLW now in its fifth season Brisbane was playing in its third Grand Final, after losses to year one to the Crows and year two to the Western Bulldogs.
In both of these season deciding losses, the Lions endured the agony of defeat by a goal.
Brent is the son of a West Broken Hill legend, “Badger” Staker, a 300-plus game, four-time best and fairest at Wests.
Brent himself played 160 AFL games (110 games with West Coast and 50 games with Brisbane) across 13 seasons at the top level of the game, after being initially being drafted to the Eagles with pick number 37 in the 2002 AFL National Draft.
Previous to that he made A Grade debut in Broken Hill Football League back in 2000 at age 16 for the West Robins.
Eloise “EJ” Jones, a premiership player with the Crows in 2019, also played in this contest, for the bridesmaids, enduring the agony of Grand Final defeat this year.
The smooth moving talent started on the wing for Adelaide and was a solid performer in this contest.
She finished with 11 disposals, including nine kicks, and laid a pair of tackles, along with kicking her team’s third goal.

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Catherine comes back

Originally published: Wednesday, 21st April, 2021

Country musician Catherine Britt will be coming back to Broken Hill and the Far West to put on her Bush Pubs Tour.
This time around she’s bringing the band and will also feature a number of special guests.
Not only will she return to some of her favourite bush pubs – but a whole stack of brand new locations have been added – thanks to fans responding to a call to action on social media about where to take this year’s tour.
The idea for the Bush Pubs Tour came to Catherine while travelling Australia in a caravan and she could see the bush had been starved for live music for far too long.
She found that by taking her music to the Outback, people came out in droves, and she’s made a lot of life long friends and new fans along the way.
“I think it’s so important to take music to these remote areas that not many people usually go. Slim and Joy did it back in the day and their story really inspired me to start this tour,” she said.
“Seeing the people that come along – sometimes from hundreds of kilometres away and some may not even know who I am – but are just so excited for some live music in the bush.
“The Bush Telegraph takes hold and word gets around. As a result, the shows are a lot of fun and have a real vibe.”
Catherine spent a lot of time in the region when she managed the Silverton Hotel for Peter and Patsy Price as they went on holidays.
During that time, she organised a Summer Vibes festival and put on a number of shows at the Hotel.
Catherine’s show will kick off in Tilpa on Friday, April 30 then onto Broken Hill on May 1 and 2 for two shows at the Broken Hill Pub.
She will then head on to Coober Pedy.
“It’s been a while since I’ve been back to Broken Hill, way longer than I planned.
“But I’m excited to get back out there. It’s my second home.”
Catherine said her shows are always a good time and will feature new and old works as well as some Country classics.
“The band are fantastic, it’s really like an old school country show.
“It’s just about getting back to the bush. It’s fun and interactive.
“I can’t wait to come back to the beautiful world you live in.”
Catherine will sing songs from her new album ‘Home Truths’.
After 20 years of being a major label artist, this album is a new beginning and her first release as a completely independent Australia artist.
It’s a decision based on Catherine’s desire to take complete control of her career and to have ownership of her own recording masters and copyrights.
That’s something that, now as a parent of two young children,  she believes is important – having something to pass on to them.
This independence was largely due to the loyalty and passion of Catherine’s fans who have been with her on this ongoing journey of music and song.
A crowd funding campaign more than exceeded expectations and was a massive statement of the belief Catherine’s fans have in her, her songs and music.
The shows are free and bookings may be required at each venue.
WHAT: Catherine Britt’s Bush Pubs tour
WHEN AND WHERE:    
Fri April 30 - TILPA HOTEL, Tilpa NSW - 8pm
Sat May 1 - THE BROKEN HILL PUB, Broken Hill NSW - 8pm
Sun May 2 - THE BROKEN HILL PUB, Broken Hill NSW - 3pm

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COVID continues to impact Silver City cinema

Originally published: Saturday, 17th April, 2021

With uncertainty in the film industry, the Silver City Cinema may be shutting its doors.
The Silver City Cinema’s Ashton Wren addresed rumours that had been circulating in the city that they will close at the end of the month.
He said while that they won’t be shutting shop completely, they may have to look at closing down for a time.
“We’re not getting any films, all releases have been pushed back, so we may have to shut our doors for a little while.”
During COVID, the cinema did screen old films, but Ashton said it wasn’t lucrative to do it again.
“It’s not worth screening old films,” he said.
“Currently, we have Peter Rabbit and Godzilla screening and they are doing ok.
“But the film companies have said we won’t be getting any movies now until August.”
Ashton said the uncertainty of it all made it really difficult to run a business.
“The film companies could ring up tomorrow and say we have some movies we’re sending out.
“Or they can give you nothing.
“We were supposed to have Top Gun 2 in July but that’s been pushed back to November.”
He said the situation in America with COVID has really impacted the film industry.
“We were supposed to be getting good movies in May but Disney and Paramount have said no, because America haven’t got their act together.
“They’ve also said no kids movies will be released in June or July - so there will be no movies for the kids during the school holidays.
Silver City Cinema is another business that has been affected by the discontinuation of Jobkeeper, with Ashton admitting that the loss of the subsidy made it hard to financially plan.
“It’s not cheap to run a cinema, it’s actually cheaper to close.
“The film companies continue to raise prices.
“I can’t sugar coat it, everyone in my family has other jobs.”
Ashton said they will review what they are doing at the end of the month.
He added that it was disappointing as they’ve just got the Dine and Discover vouchers working.
“We had to wait 10 weeks to get that approved and people really appreciated having somewhere to go to utilise that.”
And despite the difficulties, he was appreciative of the continuing community support.
“They always get around us.
“But it’s just a very hard situation.”
Before COVID, the Silver City Cinema had been looking to undertake a number of renovations to create a modern facility with two theatres and potential for more film screenings.

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Wiz hits 200

Originally published: Saturday, 17th April, 2021

The man they call ‘Wizza’, best known on field for his goal sense and forward pressure, will line up for his 200th league game this weekend for the Bulldogs.
Anthony Henderson, has five A Grade premierships to his name, holds the North Broken Hill Football Club’s leading goal kicker record and now add a 200 game milestone to his list of accolades.
Henderson said he was under the impression that this game was scheduled to fall next weekend, therefore he was caught slightly off guard when it came a week early.
“I don’t know how I really feel about it, it’s good to get there — definitely good to get there,” he said.
“It’s a bit overwhelming, I’m a bit nervous, a lot of different emotions.
“I was more prepared for it next week, it definitely sprung on me. I’ve known that next week was going to be my 200th for a bit of a period of time so it never has phased me being a milestone game.
“I’m proud to get to it but feeling nervous now that it’s here a week earlier.”
When asked about his achievements, Henderson was quick to acknowledge the team success he has been a part of over the years.
The five premierships he said are his biggest achievement.  
As well as in 2019 when he overtook the NFC’s all-time leading goal kicker tally, “that’s pretty special to me, kicking goals definitely gives me a lot of confidence as well”.
Henderson has grown up playing for the Bulldogs and a majority of his senior games have been played in the blue and white, he holds the club near to his heart.
“Just the mates you get from growing up there, all the mates you get you know, the memories you make, the friends you make, it’s all pretty special and it’s like a second family I guess,” he said.
There were a few stand out players Henderson has enjoyed playing with throughout his 200 games.
“Definitely my current coach (Brett Johnson); he’s probably the number one.
“It does mean a lot to have him coach now, it was hard when he retired and now he’s back around and even playing.
“He’s also a confidence booster for me. He’s always brought me into the game when I’m not in it.
“He’s smart and knowledgeable.”
“And, of course, you’ve got Codie (Howard) and Jayden (Kelly) ­— there’s been some pretty good players. There’s too many to name.”
Henderson aims to improve his match fitness throughout the 2021 season and hopes to possibly reach the 500 goal mark, from which he’s not too far away from.
“I’d like to, at some stage maybe. I think I’m getting a bit too old and I’m definitely not a hundred percent fit — I know that — and there’s a long way to go there.”
He believes that the club has a good dynamic of junior and senior players at the moment.
“We’ve got a good mix, there’s a lot of good juniors that are pretty skilful and they bring a lot of electricity to us,” he said.
“And I suppose there’s a group of us that are getting a bit older and the juniors give us a boost, which is good to have again. It’s going to be interesting coming to the end of the season.
“I’d just like to thank everyone that’s helped me along the way. I couldn’t get there without anyone really, outside and inside of footy.”

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Art reflecting life

Originally published: Saturday, 17th April, 2021

Highly politicised, with public and stakeholder positions often dramatically polarised, indigenous issues are never far off the radar.
And it is a public space where the waters are constantly muddied by shifting social attitudes, loud voices and deaf ears.
It is little wonder then that questions surrounding validity and appropriation within indigenous art circles are also subject to strong opinions, with indigenous iconography fiercely protected by cultural gatekeepers both black and white.
Throw into that mix an apparently white, red-headed indigenous woman and you are adding a layer of complexity to an already highly nuanced world, a world that local indigenous artist Krystal Evans took some time to find her place in.
“The fact that it is so political, that put me off initially.
“I just didn’t feel like fighting that battle, particularly as a very white-looking woman. A part of me felt like I didn’t deserve it or that I couldn’t own it.”
But with all four of her grandparents full-blooded aboriginals, she is without question a Barkandji woman.
And although she spent most of her childhood and subsequently her adult life living away, the family would regularly come “home” for holidays, times she remembers as uncomplicated “fun, sun filled days spent with family.”
But her feelings toward the area she calls home became more complex as she entered adulthood.
“When I started coming back here and seeing family as a woman, I always felt very sad when I left and I didn’t really know how to place that.
“I used to cry in the car on the drive away and I wasn’t sure why.”
Prejudice was unfortunately part of the confusion.
Her father, also a white-looking red head, was fiercely proud of his indigenous heritage, never making a secret of the fact that he was a Barkandji man.
“We never hid the fact that we were a Koori family.”
And so despite the white looks, racist taunts were part of her childhood, and the prejudice went both ways.
“I’ve had some of my cousins say to me ‘why tick the box? You look white, why wouldn’t you just live your life as a white person?”
All of which meant that it took time for Krystal to come to terms with her own story.
“A few years ago I realised I wanted to be out here.
“I began to understand that the landscape is a very big thing for me.
“I love it artistically but I guess I didn’t always know that it was more than the way it looked.
“It’s only relatively recently that I began to realise just how connected I felt.”
That same awakening occurred within her creative practice, a practice that appropriates a variety of indigenous identifying markers and blends them with elements of her own lived experience. An approach that hasn’t been without controversy.
“I had an aboriginal artist tell me once I shouldn’t use dots and I had no right to use them.
“And I know that’s very controversial and people do think very strongly and protectively about their unique styles. They see it as a way to keep their culture whole.”
Hardly surprising, given that for many, indigenous culture can appear to be slipping away.
But for Krystal, there’s always been a natural progression of appropriation and evolution in all things and art is no different. And she sees the work she creates as a part of that evolution.
“There was a big colonial interruption and so things are obviously different.
“There are people on both sides that believe that at some point in history
aboriginal art should have just stopped
and stayed where it was but I don’t agree entirely with that.”
And the work Krystal has on display at the Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery is a personal reflection on the evolution of the story of our First Nations people that has been undeniably altered since 1788.
A collage of indigenous iconography that is feminine, feminist and layered, much like the woman herself. A work she refers to as “Part of my creation story”, a story that is constantly evolving.
The work of Krystal Evans is part of Maari Ma Indigenous Art Awards on show at The Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery until April 25.

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Lenton stars in game 100

Originally published: Wednesday, 14th April, 2021

Alexis Lenton joined an elite group of locals last Friday night when she player her 100th game of Women’s football. 

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Seeing the Artist’s way

Originally published: Wednesday, 14th April, 2021

Local artist and Broken Hill Art Exchange co-founder Susan Thomas will present the second of a series of free workshops at the RFDS Wellbeing Place this weekend and she hopes it will be successful after last weekend’s positive response.

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Outback Woodstock booms

Originally published: Wednesday, 14th April, 2021

“9,000 attendees and 340 dogs” are booked in for the biggest event ever staged in Outback NSW, the inaugural, Broken Hill Mundi Mundi Bash, according to founder, Greg Donovan. 

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Professionals visit Broken Hill

Originally published: Saturday, 10th April, 2021

A group of seven professionals travelled to the region recently to learn about businesses and the economy.

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Kelly joins 200 club

Originally published: Saturday, 10th April, 2021

Star of the local league, Jayden Kelly will add a 200-game milestone for the Bulldogs to his list of accolades from a stellar career so far. 

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Tourism surge

Originally published: Saturday, 10th April, 2021

Anyone who thought that last October’s tourism tsunami was a flash in the pan had better think again. The Easter weekend combined with school holidays and of course the Heritage Festival gave Broken Hill a strong sense of what tourism in a post lockdown COVID world is going to look like, and it’s subtly different from anything the city has experienced in the past.

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Clisby enters the 2021 SANFL season full of optimism

Originally published: Friday, 2nd April, 2021

Now 31, and one of the senior
pro’s in the North Adelaide side,
Mitch Clisby is keen to reach the
pinnacle again in 2021, a second
SANFL premiership to go with his
2018 triumph.
“My preparation for this campaign
has been good,” Clisby told
the Barrier Truth.
“I have no injury issues and
am feeling fit, ready for another
campaign.
“Because of the later finish to the
2020, we’ve had a shorter pre-season
and we’re well-managed by the
fitness staff at Prospect.
“I’d like to get my 150-game
milestone for the Roosters ticked
off this year.”
Clisby first debuted back in 2010
under five-time Central District
premiership player Daniel Healy
when he was in charge.
They played Woodville West
Torrens at Prospect and has currently
played 138 league games
across two stints
His first year at the Roosters
was back in 2008, the year he
played NSW state underage football,
participating in a handful of
North Under 19s games under the
tutelage of Stephen Keam.
“Josh Francou played an important
role and was critical in my
development as a footballer in his
time coaching North,” Clisby continued.
“He helped me get drafted, giving
me a license to play with flair
out of defence.”
In 2012, North Adelaide were
preliminary finalists, losing to
West Adelaide. However, the silver
lining was that Clisby was collected
by Melbourne in the rookie
draft, with selection number 19.
He began his AFL tenure, on the
day Neil Craig took over the reins
at the Demons coach mid-season,
playing his first game at the MCG
against St Kilda.
“After my time at Melbourne
finished, I received several offers
and was given plenty of options,
but I was always coming back to
Prospect,” Clisby explained.
“In 2015 Ken McGregor was
our senior coach at North Adelaide
and Michael Handby took over
mid-season.
“The arrival of Josh Carr in
2016 was massive and gave our
club a new direction.
“While we didn’t get a lot of
wins on the board initially, you
could see the group was building.
“Playing AFL was a dream come
true, but being a member of the
Roosters SANFL flag winning
side in 2018 was the pinnacle.
“We were around the mark again
last year, but finished as bridesmaids.”
Clisby, another of the West
Broken Hill Robins to get to the
highest level in our national football
code, is a teacher at Nailsworth
High School looking after year-six
students.
It is a bit of a juggle to balance
his work, sport and personal life –
Mitch and his partner, Sarah, have
identical twin girls, Isla and Billie
that are now seven-months old.
In the season opener on Good
Friday, Clisby and North Adelaide
travel out to the Ponderosa and
take on Central District.
This is one of four SANFL
league games scheduled on Good
Friday, along with South playing
Adelaide at Flinders University
Stadium, Noarlunga; Woodville
West Torrens versus Sturt at Oval
Avenue, where another Silver City
export Kobe Mutch is expected to
debut for the Eagles and Glenelg
taking on West at the Bays.
The night before the SANFL
season launches with traditional
rivals Port Adelaide playing
Norwood at The Parade.

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Big Race hits the Silver City

Originally published: Friday, 2nd April, 2021

The Amazing Race Australia has been
a favourite TV show of mine.
Since it began earlier this year, my family
and I have barely missed an episode.
But last week it got even better as the
twenty-second leg of the race was undertaken
in our home of Broken Hill.
The final four teams travelled to Broken
Hill from Dubbo to complete a series of
challenges in Sturt Park to Silverton.
It was ‘The Super Sikhs’ Jaskirat and
Anurag, ‘The Gold Coast Girls’ Ashleigh
and Amanda, ‘The Geek and the Princess’
Aleshia and Chris and ‘The Cowboys’
Brendon and Jackson.
I personally like to refer to Jackson as
‘Jezza’ because I think he looks eerily similar
to Jeremy Cameron the footballer.
Beau Ryan, the host of The Amazing Race
Australia opened the episode by stating that
Broken Hill is the unofficial home of the
New South Wales outback - which I wasn’t
aware that we are known as that.
The team’s first appearance in the Silver
City saw them racing from the airport, hailing
a taxi and asking for the quickest route
to the Palace Hotel - little do they know it
takes five minutes from one side of town to
the other, how much quicker do they want?
They were instructed to find the big heel
at the Palace for the direction for their first
challenge, they had to roam the streets of
town figuring out the street names based off
of the elements of the periodic table to then
head to an intersection, collect a chemical
compound from each one for a final concoction
at the big ant.
I personally would have no clue where the
big ant is and I’ve lived here for all 22 years
of my life.
While I know our streets are named after
minerals I’m no science whiz so I wouldn’t
be able to match them to elements of the
periodic table.
However, when the teams were running
around town searching for streets or asking
for directions I spotted the BDT building
and my car in the background.
Teams then had to find the Junction Mine,
where one teammate was required to balance
a seesaw with a teammate on one end
and fill a metal drum with dirt and rocks to
match their weight on the other.
During this Amanda said “In the wind
storm with all the dust” and all I could do
was laugh at the fact that her city girl was
showing and she didn’t know what a dust
storm was.
Next up was the journey to Silverton,
specifically John Dynon’s Galley where
they had to count all 107 bicycle and tricycle
wheels within a marked area for their next
clue which directed them to the Silverton
Hotel where they were greeted by Shelita
Buffet - one of Broken Hill’s resident drag
queens.
Shelita served them a disgusting looking
liquid which each contestant had to drink
from a long high-heeled boot aka a ‘shoey’
before they could collect their final clue.
I have no idea what they were drinking but
I guarantee that Peter and Patsy don’t serve
it on tap.
For the final leg of the Broken Hill
challenges teams raced to the Mad Max 2
Museum to find Beau at the pitstop and
secure a place in the top three.
Three of my favourite teams have made
it to the final three and battle for a place in
the grand final in Tuesday night’s episode
in Sydney.
You can stream the Broken Hill episode
on 10Play for free and tune in on Channel 10
on Sunday night (March 28) from 7.30pm
for the grand finale of The Amazing Race
Australia, and I’m sure it will be one to
remember.

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Off the beaten track

Originally published: Friday, 2nd April, 2021

 

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