24.9°C 03:00 pm

City pound full to capacity

Friday, 31st May, 2019

Vet assistant Tom Bootle and rehoming volunteer Kelly Dwyer with Bucks and Bulldog, who currently reside at the city pound. Two dogs that were surrendered and are now on the lookout for another potential owner to take them home. PICTURE: Myles Burt Vet assistant Tom Bootle and rehoming volunteer Kelly Dwyer with Bucks and Bulldog, who currently reside at the city pound. Two dogs that were surrendered and are now on the lookout for another potential owner to take them home. PICTURE: Myles Burt

By Myles Burt

The dog pound has reached capacity as Broken Hill suffers from an influx of owners handing in unwanted pets.

Broken Hill Vet Clinic’s Dr Guillame Tabateau, who runs the city pound, said they’ve been making a huge effort to rehome dogs and cats.

He said it comes at a large cost to the city pound in feeding animals, transporting them interstate to new homes, and also housing them in the pound.

“We’re avoiding putting down any dogs as you can imagine because it’s not a nice thing to do, which means while that’s happening we’re getting a big build up,” Dr Tabateau said.

“The other thing we’re finding, is too many people finding an excuse of not wanting a dog and dumping it in the pound.

“In the last three weeks, we would’ve sent to a new home close to 40 dogs.”

Dr Tabateau said too many people aren’t fully aware of the responsibility of owning a dog.

Many new dog owners are getting rid of their pets between the ages of six months and two years.

“I don’t know whether it’s just a biased impression or not, but we seem to get a lot of people who just can’t keep these dogs,” Dr Tabateau said.

“It seems to be a whole thing of not getting a dog suitable to them and, as a result, when they get to a certain age letting them go.

“So we tend to get a lot of larger breed dogs in and they’re getting harder to rehome.”

The same has been happening with cats due to a lack of responsibility to de-sexing pets, which would leave the animal better off and create positive health benefits for the pet.

“There’s an absolute overflow in feral cats at the moment,” Dr Tabateau said.

“I know there’s one certain client that over the years I think he said he was up to number 56 in feral cats that he’s caught, and that’s just at one address.

ren’t a lot of people de-sexing their cat, we’re getting many litters in which we’re trying hard to rehome.

“The numbers coming into the pound are just increasing, it’s not slowing down.

“Admittedly a lot of those are feral cats, stray cats or litters.

“But there’s certainly a lot of dogs coming in and it’s very depressing from our point of view.”

Even with assistance from volunteers like Kelly Dwyer and Angryface Transport, who help rehome many dogs from the city pound, the numbers are still increasing due to lack of owner responsibility, de-sexing pets, microchipping along with supplying pets with collars and nametags.

“We’ve still got I’d say more than we desire, because we don’t desire animals to be in the pound,” Dr Tabateau said.

“People should make a commitment, and probably think more about what sort of animal would suit their lifestyle.

“Not just getting an animal because it’s free, or it’s cute or whatever.

“Understand that a de-sexed animal is cheaper to keep, and an animal that’s more suited to your lifestyle you’re more likely to keep it.

“It’s just not fair on the animals being dumped.”

Locals who are interested in adopting a dog or cat from the city pound are more than welcome to visit the Broken Hill Vet Clinic.

The pound also only accepts dry pet food donations from public. Locals who have lost a dog or are looking for a dog to adopt can visit Far West Animal Rescue on Facebook.

 

© Copyright 2020 Barrier Daily Truth, All Rights Reserved. ABN: 38 684 603 658