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Get to know the greyhounds

Friday, 1st November, 2019

Broken Hill Greyhound Club, Regan Edgecombe, with one-year-old Foxy who has had a good racing career but also loves a cuddle and sitting on the lounge. Foxy will race at the Newmarket track on Saturday. PICTURE: Emily McInerney Broken Hill Greyhound Club, Regan Edgecombe, with one-year-old Foxy who has had a good racing career but also loves a cuddle and sitting on the lounge. Foxy will race at the Newmarket track on Saturday. PICTURE: Emily McInerney

By Emily McInerney

The first greyhound night meeting of the year will kick off with an open afternoon for all locals to come along and join in on the action.

President of the Broken Hill Greyhound Club, Regan Edgecombe, said the club was able to hold the open day thanks to funding from the ‘Back of the Track’ grants by the NSW Government.

Mr Edgecombe said it had a two-fold aim of encouraging people to attend the dogs  and kickstart a possible greyhound adoption program.

“We thought it would be great to open the greyhounds up to the public,” he said.

“We’ve been around since 1974 and I think people still don’t know where we are.

“It would also be good to dispel some myths about greyhounds and educate people.

“People often think they are vicious but that is just not the case.

“We are trying to get a rehoming program up and running but Saturday won’t be about adopting a dog.”

Mr Edgecombe said there will also be a number of interesting and informative guest speakers on the day.

“Alicia Fuller (General Manager Greyhound Adoption Program), Norman Blackman (GRNSW Chief Vet), Kersti Seksel (Specialist in Veterinary Behavioural Medicine Sydney) and Tracy Irons (Behaviour Trainer Australian Veterinary Behaviour Service, Adelaide).

“Tracy and Kersti will be available for a one-on-one chat with people from Broken Hill who have pets with behavioural problems.

“Alicia will be available to discuss GAP, new initiatives and directions for GAP as well as the rehoming of greyhounds.

“Norman will be discussing welfare and education.”

Mr Edgecombe said greyhounds were often are misunderstood.

“They are a dog that hasn’t had any real domestic education; sit, stay, etcetera.

“Their DNA tells them to chase but when many retire they need a loving home.

“People think they need to run for hours a day, but often a half an hour daily walk is enough.

“They are low maintenance, have a simple diet and sometimes they just want to cuddle all day. They are very cat-like.”

Greyhounds, if kept healthy, can live up 14 years.

“They have been hard done by over the years,” Mr Edgecombe said.

“They are really beautiful animals; I’ve got seven retirees at home.”

He said the requirement for muzzles can also be off putting.

“It is so if they do get out and chase something, they can’t hurt an animal. “They’re not a dog to maul.

“It’s just about finding the right environment for a retired dog.

“The industry has had a lot of reforms in recent years, all for the betterment of the animal and the industry.”

The Saturday event will have jumping castles and lots of fun activities for the kids.

John Doe will be singing during the afternoon between 2.30 and 5.30pm, and there will be a free sausage sizzle.

“We encourage all pet owners to attend and ask our guest speakers as many questions as they can about their pets or anything about our wonderful sport of greyhound racing.”

Gates open at 2.30pm and the speakers will be available all afternoon.

“Kennelling of our racing hounds will start at 5.45pm with the first race at 7pm.

“There is also a full bar, canteen and TAB facilities.

“We hope to see some new faces at the Newmarket race track in Lane Street.”

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