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Preserving the land

Monday, 7th February, 2011

ohn and Judy Blore planted saltbush seedlings in June last year as part of a project to rehabilitate a 50 hectare claypan on Belmont Station near Broken Hill. John Blore received funds through the Rangeland Rehabilitation program to undertake deep ripping of the claypan to encourage water absorption and planted 15,000 seedlings. (Photo: Airlie Blore) ohn and Judy Blore planted saltbush seedlings in June last year as part of a project to rehabilitate a 50 hectare claypan on Belmont Station near Broken Hill. John Blore received funds through the Rangeland Rehabilitation program to undertake deep ripping of the claypan to encourage water absorption and planted 15,000 seedlings. (Photo: Airlie Blore)

Money is now available to help station owners in the far west improve their properties and preserve the natural landscape. 

The funds can be used for a range of things from large-scale fencing for better managing thousands of hectares, to the protection of small stands of rare and endangered plants.

Station owners are being invited by the Western Catchment Management Authority to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) for funding through the Authority's Incentive Program by March 11 deadline. 

This will be the last major funding round before 2013.

Western CMA General Manager, Daryl Green, said that since 2005, $15.6 million had been allocated to more than 600 land managers in the catchment.

"If people are committed to improving their local environment they should contact us," Mr Green said.

He said that projects that best contributed towards the Western CMA's management targets will be funded. 

The eight program areas for funding are: Conservation Farming; Grazing Management; Natural Resource Improvement; Localised Animal and Plant Pest Management; Riparian and Water Quality; High Conservation Value; Training and Community Activities; and New and Innovative Projects.

Mr Green said that there had been a big change to the way applications for funding will be processed this year.

Applicants should submit a brief Expression of Interest by Friday, March 11. Western CMA staff will then work with them to develop their application before the deadline of June 30. 

"Only those applicants who have submitted an Expression of Interest will be considered for assessment," Mr Green said.

"This change will provide people with more direct and personal support from Western CMA staff members across the period of application development. It gives applicants more time and flexibility to work with our staff on their application.

"It also ensures that they have every opportunity to present their funding proposal in the most advantageous way and demonstrate to the assessment panel the way their project will improve the health of the Western Catchment.

"In the past we have funded a wide range of projects including converting machinery to minimum till, waterspreading, fencing waterways, fencing and installing trapyards, and Aboriginal site protection."

Information sessions to let people know more about the program and how to apply will be held in Wilcannia on February 18, Ivanhoe on February 23 and Packsaddle on February 26. 

For more information about these sessions phone freecall number 1800 032 101. 

"I encourage anyone interested in seeking funding for on-ground works, activities and training in natural resources to apply," Mr Green said.

The Western CMA is funded by the NSW and Federal governments from Catchment Action NSW and the Caring for our Country program.

A funding brochure is being mailed to everyone on the Western CMA mailing list and an electronic copy, along with guidelines and the Expression of Interest form, is available by calling 1800 032 101 or visiting www.western.cma.nsw.gov.au

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