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Russian's re-examines roo's

Thursday, 3rd June, 2010

* Origin Game Meats co-owner Kaye Brown said a deal with China to export ‘roo meat could mean the expansion of the Broken Hill kangaroo processing plant. * Origin Game Meats co-owner Kaye Brown said a deal with China to export ‘roo meat could mean the expansion of the Broken Hill kangaroo processing plant.

The local kangaroo industry could be bolstered as the Russian
Trade Commissioner visits a Queensland kangaroo processing
plant next week.
The co-owner of the city’s meat processing plant, Kaye Brown, said the visit was a positive step for the industry which has been struggling after ‘roo meat exports to Russia were
cancelled following a contamination scare about 12 months ago.
“It’s certainly a positive
step. Every move that
anyone can make to make
... to open up Russia will
be great,” Origin Game
Meats’ Ms Brown said.
The QLD rural lobby
group, AgForce, will host
Commissioner Yuri
Aleshin and hopes to
convince him that
Australian kangaroo meat
is safe to go back onto
Russian plates.
“We want kangaroos
back on the appetite of
the Russians,” AgForce
sheep and wool president
Brett Finlay told AAP.
Mr Finlay said the
industry had introduced
new training regimes, a
new traceability regime
and other measures to
win back the Russians’
confidence.
“The industry has had
a very significant look at
itself, look at the production
system,” he said.
Ms Brown said the
changes made to the
industry were done
across the board.
“The regulations have
been brought in
Australia-wide so the
changes made in QLD
have also been made in
NSW,” she said.
“There is a lot more
monitoring of temperature
controls now, they’re
much stricter about temperature
control.”
Ms Brown said temperature
monitoring was
done both at the chiller
boxes, mobile refrigerated
units located at various
places around the
region, and back in the
meat works.
“Carcasses come down
to temperature within 24
hours and they must
maintain temperature all
the way through. And it’s
quicker now from carcass
to carton.”
The closing of the
Russian market saw the
local meat works, then
owned by a different
company, close its doors
putting more than 50
workers out of a job.
The meat works was
subsequently re-opened
by Origin Game Meats,
which now employs
around 25 people.
Ms Brown said the
reopening of the Russian
market would be a boon
for the industry.
“It would have a significant
positive impact for
our business and the
industry as a whole,” she
said.
“The Russian market is
a huge market.
“Other processors in
the industry would benefit
and that flows through
to the harvesters.
“Prices would pick up
too.”
Ms Brown said recent
rains had not yet seen a
big increase in ‘roo numbers
but that in the medium
to long term the
market was looking good.
“We’re probably aren’t
seeing huge numbers yet,
but the rain will have a
positive impact,” she
said.
“The medium to long
term prospects are excellent.
There are great conditions
for raising big,
healthy animals.”
Meanwhile Ms Brown
said that there had been
no further developments
on a ‘roo trade with
China despite the Federal
Minister for Agriculture,
Tony Burke, signing off
on a deal earlier this year.
“If we can get into
China it would be very
good for us and for the
industry as a whole,” Ms
Brown said.
Currently the local
works is processing kangaroo
and venison for
both the domestic and
overseas market.

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