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Lasting legacy

Saturday, 6th September, 2014

Over the years they’ve overseen many projects but for Paul DeLisio and Peter Oldsen, who are leaving City Council after a combined 38 years, some stick in the mind more than others. PICTURE: Darrin Manuel Over the years they’ve overseen many projects but for Paul DeLisio and Peter Oldsen, who are leaving City Council after a combined 38 years, some stick in the mind more than others. PICTURE: Darrin Manuel

Managers recall major projects

Broken Hill’s Regional Art Gallery and Aquatic Centre stand out as two milestone projects for Council’s Group Managers Peter Oldsen and Paul DeLisio.

The two managers will leave Council after 30 years and eight years respectively serving the Broken Hill community.

Peter Oldsen started his time with Broken Hill City Council in 1983 for a brief period, before coming on board as a trainee health and building surveyor in 1984.

He progressed through the ranks and was appointed as director in 1999 (what is now a group manager).

“There have been many highlights along the way, but the full restoration of the Sully’s site, from a derelict building into the magnificent Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery is a standout,” Mr Oldsen said.

“The heritage work and the verandah project have also been very rewarding. We have a unique city and to work so hard in developing and pulling together our bid in having us recognised at Australia’s first heritage listed city - when the announcement takes place - is something that I can look back on with pride.

“The UNESCO Asia Pacific Heritage Commendation in 2002 and The Energy Australia National Trust Award for Conservation of the Built Environment in 2005 certainly come to mind as significant recognition of our efforts to transform our city through heritage programs.

“There have also been significant challenges and the former gas works site in Mercury Street has been one of those. We had to fight through two changes of legislation to see the project completed.

“There seemed to be a spanner in the works throughout that process. It is great to see the end result today.”

Mr Oldsen said the upgrade of the landfill was also something that he could look back on and say “that has benefitted the city”.

“Prior to 2000 if it rained you were stuck in eight inches of mud out there - lucky it didn’t rain too often.

“Today we have a facility that recycles, mulches, has a second hand store and is opened seven days a week - rain included.

“Our efforts were recognised in 2004 with National Tidy Towns Award for Litter and Waste Management.”

Taking on the role Group Manager Infrastructure eight years ago the machinations of Local Government were all new for Paul DeLisio.

“I was looking for a change and challenge and knew that the role would provide both so I took the plunge. As it turns out, it has been more challenging than I anticipated,” Mr DeLisio said.

“There have been many highlights. I have always drawn particular satisfaction from infrastructure projects and I have been fortunate enough to have been able to contribute to the completion of a range of projects that I know our community will continue to value for many years to come.

“Each time I go to, or past, the Broken Hill Aquatic Centre I will take pride that we were able to realise our initial vision of a facility ‘as good as any in regional Australia’.

“I also believe the transformation of the CPS PowerStation into the BH Film Studios will prove to be a great asset for the city and I take heart from the fact that we have transformed the old gasworks site in Mercury Street from a contaminated eyesore into a green reserve that has become a valued recreation facility.

“It has been a privilege to serve the community.”

Paul finished with Council on August 29 and Peter continues until September 12.

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