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Civic delay

Saturday, 16th July, 2016

(From left) Managing director of Unique Urban Built, Nathan O’Neill, site manager, Peter Taylor, and A J + C practice manager Michael O’Brien in the upstairs forum room that is expected to accommodate up to 150 people. PICTURE: Emily Roberts (From left) Managing director of Unique Urban Built, Nathan O’Neill, site manager, Peter Taylor, and A J + C practice manager Michael O’Brien in the upstairs forum room that is expected to accommodate up to 150 people. PICTURE: Emily Roberts

By Emily Roberts

The demolition of the Civic Centre is almost finished but the redevelopment may take longer than expected.

The refurbishment of Broken Hill’s premiere concert hall began in June with internal demolition work clearing the way for the $5.1 million redevelopment.

Managing director of Unique Urban Built, Nathan O’Neill, said yesterday the demolition was 98 per cent complete.

“We are just going through some design issues we have uncovered and we want to firm up some of the designs so they are fit for purpose,” Mr O’Neill said.

“We have conducted some preliminary electrical work and will redesign a few areas that have some issues.”

Site manager, Peter Taylor, said it appeared that the refurbishment might not be finished by the expected end date.

“The mechanical ductwork needs to be altered, so we are working with an unknown timeframe.

“We have had some issues, so we may not be able to be complete on time.”

Mr O’Neill said they would keep Council informed of their timeframe and aim to ensure events booked for October at the Civic Centre can still go ahead.

“We want to be able to produce a quality product and provide the quality service that is expected of us,” he said.

“We will inform Council on all of our issues. We will also aim to accommodate as best as possible all the shows that will be coming (in October).

“We will talk with the community and give as much as possible.”

 

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This is the first major refurbishment since the Civic Centre’s opening in 1971 and the community will see a big change in the look of the venue and the services it can provide.

Mayor Wincen Cuy said in June that the refurbishment would be sympathetic to the heritage of the building and complement the city’s rich architectural history. 

“Interiors and furnishings have been chosen to mirror our National Heritage status and community identity,” he said. 

The project would also consolidate Broken Hill’s position as a hub for conferences and events in outback Australia, the mayor said.

Mr O’Neill said the work had been also helped local employment.

“We have had a lot of locals working on the project, from demolition contractors, to concrete and excavating and many of the supplies came from Broken Hill.”

He said they had also worked to ensure as much material as possible could be recycled.

The big upgrade was made possible by a grant from the NSW Government’s Resources for Regions Program.

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