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Molly can't stay away

Tuesday, 21st September, 2010

* Former Alma School principal Harold Ritch with former local teacher Molly Warren, who caught up yesterday for morning tea and a gossip. * Former Alma School principal Harold Ritch with former local teacher Molly Warren, who caught up yesterday for morning tea and a gossip.

A former teacher, who left the city in 2001, has returned to check up on her home of more than 80 years.

Molly Warren, 92, taught at North, Alma, Central, Morgan Street and Burke Ward over the 47 years she worked as a teacher here.
Ms Warren retired in 1973, and continued teaching casually for 13 years.
She has returned to visit every second year since and says she has a love for her home town.
"I was here two years ago, and I've been backwards and forwards about every second year since I left in 2001," Ms Warren said.
While here, she caught up with her old boss, Harold Ritch, who was the deputy principal of Alma School.
The two began working together 50 years ago, and Mr Ritch said he still remembered her when she called him recently.
"You couldn't forget her," Mr Ritch said.
"They were the golden days in the late 40's and 50's"
Molly said she loves it in Broken Hill and tells the residents at the hostel where she now lives all about her home town.
"All the water coming down the Darling River and going out to Umberumberka; and seeing the water out there, and going out to Stephens Creek. I just love it."
She also said she loved the Sturt Desert Peas which were currently blooming around the city.
"I just love being here, I'll never forget Broken Hill."
"I live in a nine story hostel, and I've been living there for the past five and a half years.
Molly is currently writing her memoirs so family members can read her stories when she is gone.
"I'm writing it down as far as I can... think back."
"There's lots of things I could write about.
"My son said to me: 'Why don't you write a book Mum?'
"I said if I wrote everything down it might almost be a book."
Ms Warren acknowledged the school yard was a very different place when she was a teacher.
"In my day there were no knives, drugs, and what-have-you.
"When children fell in the play ground and cried you could put your arms around them and commiserate with them.
"You can't do that today."
Molly leaves on the Indian Pacific train for her home in Bankstown on Friday.


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