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Wednesday, 12th July, 2017

Visiting South Australian university student Samuel Norman at the Miner’s Memorial yesterday. Mr Norman is spending the next six weeks in the city as part of a research project that will have long-lasting benefits for the disabled. Visiting South Australian university student Samuel Norman at the Miner’s Memorial yesterday. Mr Norman is spending the next six weeks in the city as part of a research project that will have long-lasting benefits for the disabled.

By Michael Murphy

A South Australian university student is casting a critical eye over the city to help take the term “accessible outback” to whole other level.

Samuel Norman is compiling a research project as a final task for a Bachelor of International Tourism degree, and he’ll be in Broken Hill for the next six weeks identifying ways to make the Silver City more accessible to people with a disability.

His work will provide input into City Council’s plans to make city buildings and amenities more inclusive.

“The accessible outback ... we really want to bring that term back to Broken Hill,” Samuel said.

“We want to be a front runner for accessible tourism and inclusive tourism here in Broken Hill.

“So much innovation has come out of Broken Hill, with miners’ safety and working rights ... so there’s no reason why Broken Hill can’t become a front runner in accessible tourism in the outback, especially regional New South Wales.”

Samuel’s work is set to not only benefit tourists, but local residents as well, especially the 1,424 local people who identified in the 2016 census as having a profound or severe disability.

One of his first stops was to the Silver City Cinema where he learned of the desperate need for a lift to make the theatre inclusive of everyone.

“All our iconic cinemas are pretty much going in South Australia,” Samuel said.

“In Broken Hill, you have the iconic Silver City Cinema, but it is in desperate need of funding for an elevator or lift, so they can sit people up the back and make it a more inclusive.

“They have the ramp they have now, which they paid for themselves, which sits everyone at the front of the cinema, (but) people that used to visit in a wheelchair no longer go because they are too close to the screen.”

Samuel will be approaching local businesses and groups during his stay, but he welcomes people to track him down and have a chat.

He’ll be at the Palace Hotel on Friday afternoons from 5.30pm to 6.30pm, in his Flinders University polo shirt with a name badge, so people can just come along and meet him. 

You can also email him via norm0099@flinders.edu.au to arrange a meeting.

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