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Tourism funding injection

Thursday, 31st May, 2018

(From left) Barwon MP Kevin Humphries, Screen Broken Hill’s Jason King, Sulphide Street Railway Museum curator Christine Adams, West Darling Arts executive director Cherry Pratt and NSW Minister for Tourism and Major Events Adam Marshall (From left) Barwon MP Kevin Humphries, Screen Broken Hill’s Jason King, Sulphide Street Railway Museum curator Christine Adams, West Darling Arts executive director Cherry Pratt and NSW Minister for Tourism and Major Events Adam Marshall

By Myles Burt

The local tourism industry just been injected with substantial funds after the Minister for Tourism and Major Events Adam Marshall travelled to the city yesterday.

West Darling Arts and the Sulphide Street Railway & Historical Museum were two of the fortunate community groups that received state government support.

West Darling Arts secured $23,526 for Screen Broken Hill to develop the space above the Post Office building into a digital film and television hub. Screen Broken Hill’s Jason King said the funding would help them undertake renovations to bring the rooms up to scratch.

“With this funding it means we’ll be able to get our resources up to the next level and really put the word out there and get it humming along,” Mr King said.

“For us to develop any kind of film industry here, it’s going to have a substantial impact on the economy, and having a space to work out of is a really important one.”

The Sulphide Street Railway & Historical Museum gained $23,526 to aid with constructing a permanent home and preservation of the Johns Brothers Joyland Fun Fair Collection.

Railway Museum curator Christine Adams said the funds would help showcase the 1920s and 40s memorabilia.

“This is the community project that sort of everyone’s waiting for, to see the fun fair equipment up and running,” Ms Adams said.

Minister Marshall said he was keen to help tourism in Broken Hill, help locals achieve their vision and generate maximum exposure to tourists.

“The great thing is here, Broken Hill, Silverton the whole thing. You’ve got such a variety of experiences to show people,” Mr Marshall said.

“You’ve got stuff here and an experience here which is not replicated, and cannot be replicated anywhere in the state.

“As I’ve said there I’ve fallen in love with this place, it’s got a certain mystic and romance that I find irresistible as a person.

“I want to do what I can to help Broken Hill really realise its potential as a tourism Mecca.”

Mr Marshall’s next ambition is to achieve cross-state tourism collaborations with neighbouring states.

“I think it’s vital, it’s not just vital for NSW tourism, it’s vital for tourism in Australia,” he said.

“If we’re to really think about growing regional tourism, we have to find a way of getting around this bureaucratic border naval-gazing stuff.”

Mr Marshall is set to attend the next tourism ministers meeting in Adelaide on June 30. He will be pitching the idea of using state funds for cross-border tourism collaborations to his colleagues in South Australia.

He said this would help cities such as Broken Hill and Mildura, for example, that have strong connections but can’t promote each other due to state boundaries.

“I think we need to break that down and doing that is key to really taking Broken Hill’s tourism offering to the next level, and that’s something I want to do,” he said.

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